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5 Forklift Safety Elements – Part 5 “Know About Load Basics”

Forklift Safety Elements – Know About Load Basics

OSHA advises operators to check loads before picking them up with the forks, ensuring the load’s stability and dimensions will allow for safe transport. Move squarely in front of the load and move the forks apart as far as possible before driving them under the load. Make sure to not overload and that the load is centered.

Slightly tilt the forklift mast backward before lifting. Lift the load enough to clear the floor or rack. For stacking, OSHA recommends lifting the load above the lower stack by about 10 centimeters, or 4 inches.

When placing a load, operators should be squarely in front of the placement destination.  Make sure the area is flat and stable, and don’t place heavy loads on top of light ones. Lower the forks upon placing the load, and then back the forklift away. As always, ensure the load is stable.

 

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Source:https://www.safetyandhealthmagazine.com/articles/16138-elements-of-forklift-safety


8 Tips to Reduce Warehouse Utility Knife Accidents

It goes without saying. ALWAYS exercise caution when using a utility knife.

But it’s easy to forget safety tips when you’re under the gun to open a large load of cartons, loads secured with nylon banding or pallets wrapped with multiple layers of stretch film. That’s when simple mistakes can turn into serious workplace injuries. In fact, a single serious cut from a box opener can easily exceed thousands of dollars for emergency medical care, workers’ compensation and lost productivity.

In addition to causing worker injury, using a utility knife improperly can also damage a carton’s contents, rendering the goods unsalable and more losses. Worse yet, cutting the inner contents can cause liquid and powder spills that present slip and fall dangers to co-workers or customers.

We know—you get it. Especially if you play a role in keeping your workplace safe and productive.

SAFE WAREHOUSE CUTTING TECHNIQUES

  1. PROPER POSITION. Position the carton so it’s a safe distance from your abdomen, hips and thighs. Then draw the knife away from your body. Always maintain a safe distance from co-workers and customers as you cut.
  2. SHARP IS SAFE. A dull blade requires additional pressure to make the cut or may tear the cardboard. Stop and change the blade when needed. A dull blade cuts erratically and can easily slip off the cutting path, increasing chances for injury.
  3. VISUAL GUIDANCE. Never use your thumb as a guide to position the blade. Instead, plan your cut visually and grasp the knife with your entire hand.
  4. CUT AWAY FOR HANDS. Hold the carton with your hand on the opposite side you’re cutting. Keep your hands and fingers away from the cutting area at all times.
  5. PROPER EXCHANGE. Never toss or hand a knife to a co-worker. Set it down and let the co-worker pick it up.
  6. BLADE DISPOSAL. Discard used blades in a safe blade storage receptacle. Never toss in the garbage where they might injure an unsuspecting person.
  7. SAFETY DROPS. If you drop a knife, don’t try to catch it. Let it fall to the floor. Then examine the blade and mechanism for possible damage before using it again.
  8. STRETCH FILM DIRECTION. Pull stretch film away from the pallet contents before starting the cut. Start cutting the film from the top of the pallet. Never slice stretch film from the bottom up.

 

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Source: https://olfa.com/professional/tips-to-reduce-warehouse-utility-knife-accidents/


Is Your Workplace Prone to Violence?

For Some Occupations, Violence is 3rd Leading Cause of Death

Every year, 2 million American workers report having been victims of workplace violence. In 2014, 409 people were fatally injured in work-related attacks, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. That’s about 16% of the 4,821 workplace deaths that year.

While roadway incidents are the No. 1 cause of death for workers overall, violence is the third leading cause for healthcare workers, and employees in professional and business services like education, law and media, according to Injury Facts 2016®. Taxi drivers, for example, are more than 20 times more likely to be murdered on the job than other workers, according to OSHA.

But make no mistake: Workplace violence can happen anywhere.

The Numbers are Alarming

According to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, workplace violence falls into four categories: Criminal intent, customer/client, worker-on-worker and personal relationship, which overwhelmingly targets women.

Injury Facts lists data for workplace violence-related deaths, and injuries resulting in days off of work, across various occupations. Here are some statistics for 2013:

  • Government: 37,110 injuries, 128 deaths
  • Education and health services: 22,590 injuries, 35 deaths
  • Professional and Business Services: 4,460 injuries, 65 deaths
  • Retail: 2,680 injuries, 127 deaths
  • Leisure and hospitality: 2,380 injuries, 107 deaths
  • Financial activities: 1,100 injuries, 37 deaths
  • Transportation and warehousing: 840 injuries, 71 deaths
  • Construction: 680 injuries, 36 deaths
  • Manufacturing: 570 injuries, 36 deaths

No matter who initiaties the confrontation, the deadliest situations involve an active shooter. U.S. Department of Homeland Security defines active shooter as someone “actively engaged in killing or attempting to kill people in a confined and populated area.”

A lot can happen in the chaotic minutes before police arrive; DHS advises staying calm and exercising one of three options: Run, hide or fight.

  • If there is an accessible escape route, leave your belongings and get out
  • If evacuation is not possible, find a hiding place where you won’t be trapped should the shooter find you, lock and blockade the door, and silence your phone
  • As a last resort and only when your life is in imminent danger, attempt to incapacitate the shooter by throwing items, improvising weapons and yelling

Every Organization Needs to Address Workplace Violence

Managers and safety professionals at every workplace should develop a policy on violence that includes:

Know the Warning Signs

Some people commit violence because of revenge, robbery or ideology – with or without a component of mental illness. While there is no way to predict an attack, you can be aware of behaviors in coworkers that might signal future violence:

  • Excessive use of alcohol or drugs
  • Unexplained absenteeism, change in behavior or decline in job performance
  • Depression, withdrawal or suicidal comments
  • Resistance to changes at work or persistent complaining about unfair treatment
  • Violation of company policies
  • Emotional responses to criticism, mood swings
  • Paranoia

Most every “place” is somebody’s workplace. So whether you are a patron or an employee, it’s important to be alert.

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Source: https://www.nsc.org/work-safety/safety-topics/workplace-violence


May is National Electrical Awareness Month

         May is National Electrical Safety Month.

We often don’t think about electricity on a daily basis. We flip a switch, plug something in or charge a cell phone expecting it to work. However, if not used or maintained appropriately, electricity can pose serious risks.

Over the last ten years, more than 30,000 workers have been injured in workplace electrical accidents. While electrical hazards are not the leading cause of on-the-job injuries and accidents, they are disproportionately fatal and costly.

These injuries not only disrupt the lives of the workers and their families but also impact the productivity of employers. The good news is that most on-the-job electrocutions and electrical injuries can be prevented by following a few necessary steps.

The Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI) is the leading authority on workplace electrical safety. ESFI began National Electrical Safety Month in the 90’s and is the primary driving behind the annual campaign. ESFI recognizes that each work environment presents different electrical hazards. ESFI’s workplace safety materials provide valuable information to help employees make safe choices every day and tips for creating a safer work environment, whether work takes place in an office, on a job site, or in a manufacturing setting.

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Source: ESFI

2019 National Electrical Safety Advocate Guide