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Can I be sued for performing CPR? – What you need to know.

Can I be sued for performing CPR?

The American Heart Association consistently supports and promotes CPR classes for people not in the medical profession—so when someone has a cardiac arrest outside of a hospital or medical facility, there will be a higher chance of a bystander stepping in to perform lifesaving CPR while the victim waits for emergency response teams to arrive.

Studies show that brain death begins within four to six minutes after a cardiac arrest, and those who do not get CPR within that time are extremely likely not to survive. Getting CPR immediately—and if you’re not in a hospital, that usually means from a bystander—could mean the difference between life and death.

First, whether or not you can be sued will vary depending on where you are and who you are. The 2000 Federal Cardiac Arrest Survival Act grants those who administer CPR or use an AED immunity from civil charges, except in instances of willful misconduct or gross negligence.

Good Samaritan laws exist on a state-by-state basis. Mostly, they provide at least some protection for those who perform CPR or use an AED. Some states actually require you to step in if you know CPR or, in some cases, if you are a medical professional. In Vermont, for instance, requires bystanders to give “reasonable assistance” or face a $100 fine.

Generally, however, Good Samaritan Laws are there to protect bystanders who perform CPR. Mostly, you are required to ask permission before performing CPR if a person is not already in your care. If they cannot reply, then consent is implied.

You will not be protected by Good Samaritan laws if you try to go outside your area of training—if you try to perform an impromptu tracheotomy to save a choking victim, for example, and you are not a trained surgeon. If your behavior has been judged to be reckless or negligent, or if you leave the victim after initially providing care, you could also be sued.

If someone has a Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) order that specifies lifesaving care must not be provided in case of a sudden cardiac arrest or another health crisis, you must do as it says and avoid giving CPR—if you know about it. If you didn’t know about it, you generally can’t be prosecuted for giving lifesaving CPR anyway. But what about first aid? Medical professionals and lay-rescuers often ask if they can be sued for first aid? Generally, the answer is the same, you can’t be prosecuted for giving first aid to someone in need and you are not required to do so if you feel uncomfortable about it. Be sure to practice good faith and common sense if you ever end up in a situation where someone might need CPR or first aid.

Medical professionals who give CPR to people with a DNR order can potentially be in trouble—if they know about the DNR. The issue of giving CPR to someone with a DNR is complicated, however. In some states, DNR orders are only valid inside a hospital setting; outside the hospital, they do not apply. This means that an emergency response team can legally give someone CPR even if they have a DNR order. In other states, however, emergency medical responders are allowed to abide by DNR orders when responding to emergency calls in the victim’s home.

In addition, in some states, patients who move from one healthcare facility to another are required to tell their medical teams about the DNR.  Usually, medical professionals are not required to abide by a DNR order they do not know about.

The truth is that you can be sued for anything, at any time. The question is not whether you can be sued for performing CPR; the question is whether you can be successfully sued. The answer in most cases is no; Good Samaritan laws in most states protect bystanders from legal consequences if they act prudently and in keeping with their training. Hopefully, widely publicized cases of people being refused CPR will not keep non-medical citizens from getting certified for CPR—and providing lifesaving care if it is required.

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Are You Ready to Save a Life? – CPR Classes Available Now

CPR/First Aid Training – Corporate and Group Classes

Green Guard offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, Green Guard’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Looking for a Team Building opportunity? Learn to save a life while providing a great team building exercise.

 

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It’s Never Too Late To Learn – First Aid/CPR Classes for Groups & Corporations

CPR/First Aid Training – Corporate and Group Classes

Green Guard offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, Green Guard’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Looking for a Team Building opportunity? Learn to save a life while providing a great team building exercise.

 

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East Haven Teen Performs Life-Saving CPR on His Mother

An East Haven teenager is being credited with saving his mother’s life when she went into cardiac arrest while the family was in upstate New York for a wrestling tournament.

“I don’t picture myself as a hero,” 16-year-old Vincenzo “Enzo” Bunce said. “I just I picture myself as someone who just knew what to do and had the training.”

Bunce learned CPR in an East Haven High School health class.

“It’s not a certification, but it’s a way to educate the kids,” head athletic trainer Marc Aceto said.

Aceto teaches students how to perform chest compressions to the tune of the timeless Bee Gees’ song, “Staying Alive.”

“Sometimes, I’m up in the middle of class singing the song out loud, you get a few chuckles,” Aceto said, “but they understand the rhythm of how to get the heart going, to do the compressions on the CPR.”

This past Friday morning Bunce and his family checked into a hotel for a club wrestling tournament in Lake Placid.

“My mother ,she was complaining that her heart was racing and then she sat down for a second then next thing I knew it I looked away for a second she was on the floor,” Bunce said.

Maria Bunce went into cardiac arrest. Bunce’s dad dialed 911.

“I put her on her back so she can breath easier and I started chest compressions,” he said. While humming “Staying Alive” in his head, Bunce put his training to use.

“I was terrified but I was calm at the same time, the training just kicked in and the adrenaline,” he said.

Bunce said he performed chest compressions for about 90 seconds until professional emergency personnel staying in town for a convention arrived. His mother was revived and she checked into a hospital.

“She told my friend’s father to tell me to wrestle my best and not to worry about her,” Bunce said.

Following tough defeats and a forfeit win on Saturday, he saved his best effort for the final of five wrestling matches Sunday afternoon.

“This is my last chance to win a match for my mother,” Bunce said.

It was dominating victory.

“I ended the match in less than 30 seconds,” he said.

“His compassion, his love for the sport, his love for his mother, his family, how strong he is and how mature he is at 16 to be able to do what he did, its unspeakable,” Aceto said.

Bunce said he just hopes more high schools start to offer the same type of training.

“So they can help save their parents’ life, another person’s life,” he said.

Bunce’s mother is still in recovery after being transferred to Yale-New Haven Hospital.

Bunce told NBC Connecticut he’s also received CPR training from the East Haven Fire Department explorer program for youth from the town.

With the goal of becoming a firefighter and paramedic, maybe Bunce will help save more lives in the future.

 

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Source: https://www.nbcconnecticut.com/news/local/East-Haven-Teen-Performs-Life-Saving-CPR-on-His-Mother-510235181.html


It’s National CPR/AED awareness week – Here’s one thing you can do to help save a life

This week is CPR/AED awareness week – How can you make a difference?

When cardiac arrest occurs outside of the hospital, survival depends on immediate CPR, and unfortunately, almost 90% of people who suffer cardiac arrests die, according to AHA statistics.

This week commemorating CPR and AED education marks the perfect time to make sure employees know how easy CPR technique can be, and where the nearest AED is. In addition to the life-saving skills learned, A CPR class is a great team building opportunity.

 

Less than a third of cardiac arrest victims receive CPR, according to the AHA, because most bystanders feel helpless and worry that their efforts may actually make the situation worse. The fact of the matter is, CPR, especially if performed in the first few minutes of cardiac arrest, can increase a person’s chance of survival by two or even three times.

The thought of giving mouth-to-mouth to a coworker may be daunting, but it’s no longer necessary. Hands-Only CPR may help save lives until paramedics arrive, and it doesn’t involve mouth-to-mouth. There are only two steps; if you see a teen or adult suddenly collapse, call 911 and push hard and fast in the center of the chest to the beat of any tune that is 100 to 120 beats per minute.

The one thing you could do right now?  Schedule a class for you and your team – Learn CPR.

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Her father died. But this Valley senior brought him back with CPR learned at school.

Something didn’t sound right to Brie Salloum as she was getting ready for school one morning in early April. Weird noises echoed in the upstairs hallway. She compares the sounds to elongated snores, or deep, muffled gurgles.

 

Brie walked into her parents’ bedroom and found her father, Ray, lying in bed and gasping for breath.

“His teeth were gritted, and he grimaced,” her mother, Lisa Salloum, said. “I could see we were losing him.”

What happened next, medical professionals have told the family, was the beginning of “a miracle.”

Brie Salloum is a senior at Valley High School who is set to graduate Sunday at Drake University’s Knapp Center with 595 of her peers. She is a quiet, reserved 18-year-old who enjoys video games, hanging out with friends, and working at the movie theater at Jordan Creek Town Center.

Salloum puts up with school because “it’s obligatory,” she quips, but admits she enjoys it. She’s taken several advanced placement courses at Valley — AP chemistry, AP physics, AP psychology — you name it.

Her favorite class, Valley’s certified nursing assistant course, is a full-year program that allows students to earn CNA certification by the end of the school year. It’s led by Andrea Thompson, Salloum’s all-time favorite teacher.

“She makes the classroom calm,” Salloum said. “She’s like a mom to me. I really appreciate her. She’s a phenomenal teacher.”

During the CNA program, students — typically those interested in the medical field — are introduced to a variety of health careers.

One section lets students learn about emergency care, like attending to fractures and burns as well as cardiopulmonary resuscitation, also known as CPR. Salloum and her classmates completed the required training this year and are all CPR certified.

‘They’re calling him a miracle’

Ray was lying limp in his bed. Lisa yelled at Brie to dial 911.

She was about to until she saw that her mom was already on the phone. She also saw her mom trying to give her father CPR and realized she wasn’t doing it properly.

She jumped into action.

“I took the pillow out from under his head, had her move him down a little a bit so his head wouldn’t be on the headboard. Then I just started,” she said. “I was crying and yelling. I was scared that I was doing it wrong and he was just gone. Especially with CPR, you don’t get that instant gratification. It was just scary.”

“I just kept telling her to keep going,” her mom said.

Emergency medical services arrived about 3 minutes later, Brie said. Ray was rushed to a local hospital.

He was placed in a medically-induced coma and underwent hypothermia treatment in order to preserve brain activity, Lisa said.

Almost 24 hours after doctors had cooled him, Ray had an arrhythmia, which is the improper beating of the heart.

“They had to give him a defibrillator and shock him,” Brie said.

“He had literally died twice,” Lisa added. “Once, when EMTs (emergency medical technicians) arrived at home and shocked him after what Brie did, and once at the hospital. His doctor told him, ‘It wasn’t your time to go because you’ve died twice and you’ve come back.’

“They’re calling him a miracle.”

Ray remained in the intensive care unit for 10 days.

‘It’s just a complete blur to me’

Ray returned home weeks later, on April 28. He continues to recover and rebuild his strength.

“A lot of it … it’s just a complete blur to me,” Ray said. “I’m slowly starting to remember some of it, little by little. All I remember is waking up in the hospital with a couple of my friends being there — and that’s after I had been there a couple of weeks.”

Doctors told the Salloums that Ray’s cardiac incident was a fluke, and that the chances of it happening again are less than 1 percent.

“Basically, it was all brought on by the flu and pneumonia,” Ray said. “A combination of your body losing fluids and your blood thickening because you lost fluids. Your lungs being congested, putting pressure on the heart. I really don’t know.”

If it weren’t for Brie’s heroic efforts, Ray’s outcome could have been much different. EMTs at the scene and physicians at the hospital complimented her on how she performed CPR.

“She’s very modest and humble,” Lisa said. “How many kids give their dad their life?

“There are not many people in this world — even those that are in the medical field — who can say that they’ve saved someone’s life.”

Brie will attend the University of Iowa in the fall. She’s enrolled as pre-med. She doesn’t yet know if she wants to become a nurse practitioner who works in the emergency room, or if she wants to be a surgeon.

Brie said she is appreciative of the education she received at Valley, especially the CNA program.

“I’m really grateful it’s part of Valley,” Brie said. “I think it’s a good stepping stone for me to get my feet wet in the medical field. Before I was iffy. Now, I know I want to do this.”

Her dad appreciates the program, too.

“I’m grateful. I’m thankful,” he said. “It’s amazing because of the timeline: When she went into the CNA program, when she learned CPR, and when this happened to me. It’s just so all relatively close together.”

 

 

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Source: https://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/news/local/community/2019/05/21/valley-high-senior-learned-crp-class-she-used-save-her-fathers-life/3754763002/

CPR/First Aid – Are You Prepared?

CPR/First Aid – Corporate and Group Classes

 Anyone can learn CPR, is your team ready to save a life? #cprreadytosavealife

Green Guard offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, Green Guard’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

CPR classes are a great team building opportunity too!

 

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Is your team CPR ready to save a life?

CPR/First Aid – Corporate and Group Classes

 Anyone can learn CPR, is your firm ready to save a life? #cprreadytosavealife

Green Guard offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, Green Guard’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

CPR classes are a great team building opportunity too!

Call Now to speak with a Green Guard First Aid/CPR Specialist

Click Here to learn more about First Aid/CPR

Chat? Click on the “Live Chat” button

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‘It’s about saving lives:’ CPR training now required for all Georgia high school coaches

CPR and AED training for coaches is now required before the next school year, but it comes at a cost

 

At some Georgia high schools, if a student-athlete needs CPR, there wouldn’t be anyone around certified to help. The American Heart Association estimates less than 10 percent of students in that situation would survive.

“Brain death can start to occur within four to six minutes of the brain being denied oxygen,” said Bibb Schools’ director of risk management, David Gowan.

Gowan is a certified CPR instructor and teaches monthly classes to employees in his district, including every coach.

Other districts, like Bleckley and Monroe County, also require coaches to go through CPR and AED training.

In Houston County, the training is not required by the district, but encouraged by each school. Spokesperson Beth McLaughlin says each high school also has a certified athletic trainer at practices and games.

It’s a much different story at Crawford County High School, where coaches and employees are not required to take any first aid courses and there is no certified athletic trainer.

“We could lose somebody and I just couldn’t live with that,” said soccer and softball coach Holly Johnson. “This summer, we were playing ACE Academy and a girl, after the game, started having seizures.”

Johnson says she felt helpless. She was not trained to help, and she says in a rural area, it can take longer for emergency crews to get there.

“Thank goodness there were some parents there that were nurses and were trained and could help us,” she said. “If not, who knows what would have happened?”

The situation prompted Johnson to enroll in a CPR class and get certified on her own.

“As a head coach responsible for these young ladies,” she said, “it’s a lot of responsibility.”

In April, the Georgia High School Association approved a rule change requiring all coaches to go through CPR and AED training before their season begins next school year.

“It’s about saving lives,” said GHSA Executive Director Robin Hines.

That training, however, does cost money.

“We don’t have a lot of extra money laying around and we have 18 coaches,” said Crawford High School Principal Ed Mashburn. He says it will cost the school roughly $1,500 to $1,800 to certify all of their coaches.

The American Red Cross says it does cost roughly $70 to $80 per person to have one of their instructors come teach a course.

Mashburn says it’s a price worth paying for the safety of their students. He’s already scheduled a training session for May.

After the initial training, coaches will need to get re-certified every two years. If they do not, they will get fined by the GHSA.

 

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Source: https://www.13wmaz.com/article/news/health/its-about-saving-lives-cpr-training-now-required-for-all-georgia-high-school-coaches/93-f294534d-a5c0-45a1-a406-0181f4b766f5


Recent CPR Certification Helps Save Life

On Friday, April 19, Albert Lea resident Ronald Laite was invited to work on a dock at Fountain Lake with friends. Just a regular days work, for a normally healthy 43-year-old, that almost turned deadly.

“A buddy called me up and asked if I wanted to help with a dock, and so I said sure and went down there. I felt something weird going on so I tried to pull myself towards the center and then next thing you know I’m in the hospital,” said Laite.

Officials said that Laite went into cardiac arrest which is commonly associated with a heart attack, yet the two are very different.

Cardiac arrest or sudden cardiac death is an electrical problem of the heart. Basically where there is no effective heartbeat and no blood flow to the vital organs of the body. A heart attack is a circulation problem effectively where there is a blockage in one of the arteries that supply blood to the heart. So two different problems,” said Dr. Ammar Killu, who is a Cardiac Electrophysiologist at Mayo Clinic.

Dr. Killu said even though most of the people who learn how to perform CPR may never end up using it, just knowing what to do raises that persons’ chance of survival.

“Doing CPR which is basically chest compressions in this situation, helps get whatever oxygen is still in the body around to those organs. The quicker you can perform CPR the more effective the CPR is and the higher chances of survival, ” said Dr. Killu.

For chest compressions, you want to remember 30/2. 30 compressions to the chest about 2 inches in depth. You also want to administer about 120 compressions per minute.

Laite’s friend was just CPR certified two months ago, and he said that he never thought he’d have to use.

“I’m very thankful he got trained in CPR. he saved my life,” said Laite.

 

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#cprreadytosavealife 

 

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Source: https://www.kaaltv.com/news/recent-cpr-certification-helps-save-life—albert-lea/5327525/