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Own a Bulk Refillable Soap Dispenser? You Have To Read This…..

 

3 Reasons your Refillable bulk soap might not be a great idea

  1. Messy and labor intensive
  2. Proven susceptible to bacterial contamination that can lead to a range of health issues
  3. The refillable bulk soap risk was highlighted as part of a CNN report on The 8 Germiest Places at the Mall, on November 26, 2011.

Many soap dispensers in public places are contaminated with potentially harmful bacteria.

Washing with contaminated soap increase the concentrations on people’s hands and on the surfaces they touch.

Refillable Bulk Soap Puts the Health of Washroom Users and the Image of Building Owners at Risk

A recent study has shown that hands can have as much as 25 times more germs after washing with refillable bulk soap than before washing.

Refillable bulk soap is the kind of washroom soap that’s typically poured from a gallon jug into an open dispenser reservoir. Find out how this soap can put your health at risk, then take action to help stop the threat.

The Risk

  • The germs identified in bulks soap have led to infections and fatalities in immunocompromised individuals
  • The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC),1 Health Canada,2 and the World Health Organization (WHO)3 have all recognized the bacterial contamination risk of “topping off” refillable bulk soap dispensers, and have issued guidelines against the practice.

The Image

In addition to the health risk posed to tenants and washroom users, refillable bulk soap can negatively affect the image of buildings and washrooms. The pouring of soup into multiple dispensers is slow and can leave a soapy mess. The extended labor time and product waste translate to cost issues, impacting customers’ bottom lines.

The Safe, Smart and Sustainable Alternative

Building owners and facility managers have an alternative that addresses the problems associated with refillable bulk soaps. GOJO SANITARY SEALED™ Refills are factory sealed to help lock out germs. It’s the sealed soap system that’s better for people, the planet and the bottom line of customers.

Read the original article and study here.

 

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Guideline for Hand Hygiene in Health-Care Settings: Recommendations of the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee and the HICPAC/SHEA/APIC/IDSA Hand Hygiene Task Force. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. October 25, 2002 / Vol. 51 / No. RR-16. Accessed at http://www.cdc.gov/handhygiene/Guidelines.html on May 18, 2010.
  2. Health Canada Guidance Document for Human-Use Antiseptic Drugs. December 2009. pg 32.
  3. World Health Organization (2009) WHO Guidelines on Hand Hygiene in Health Care. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization Press.

 

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How can your hands possibly have 25% more germs after washing?…

Many soap dispensers in public places are contaminated with potentially harmful bacteria.

Washing with contaminated hand soap increase the concentrations on people’s hands and on the surfaces they touch.  Refillable Bulk Hand Soap Puts the Health of Washroom Users and the Image of Building Owners at Risk.

A recent study has shown that hands can have as much as 25 times more germs after washing with refillable bulk soap than before washing.

Refillable bulk soap is the kind of washroom hand soap that’s typically poured from a gallon jug into an open dispenser reservoir. Find out how this soap can put your health at risk, then take action to help stop the threat

Refillable bulk hand soap is messy and labor intensive, and has been proven susceptible to bacterial contamination that can lead to a range of health issues. The refillable bulk soap risk was highlighted as part of a CNN report on The 8 Germiest Places at the Mall, on November 26, 2011.

The Risk

  • The germs identified in bulks soap have led to infections and fatalities in immunocompromised individuals
  • The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC),1 Health Canada,2 and the World Health Organization (WHO)3 have all recognized the bacterial contamination risk of “topping off” refillable bulk soap dispensers, and have issued guidelines against the practice.

The Image

In addition to the health risk posed to tenants and washroom users, refillable bulk soap can negatively affect the image of buildings and washrooms. The pouring of soup into multiple dispensers is slow and can leave a soapy mess. The extended labor time and product waste translate to cost issues, impacting customers’ bottom lines.

The Safe, Smart and Sustainable Alternative

Building owners and facility managers have an alternative that addresses the problems associated with refillable bulk soaps. GOJO SANITARY SEALED™ Refills are factory sealed to help lock out germs. It’s the sealed soap system that’s better for people, the planet and the bottom line of customers.

Read the original article and study here.

Contact your Green Guard representative today for a free consultation.

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Guideline for Hand Hygiene in Health-Care Settings: Recommendations of the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee and the HICPAC/SHEA/APIC/IDSA Hand Hygiene Task Force. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. October 25, 2002 / Vol. 51 / No. RR-16. Accessed at http://www.cdc.gov/handhygiene/Guidelines.html on May 18, 2010. Hand Sanitizer.
  2. Health Canada Guidance Document for Human-Use Antiseptic Drugs. December 2009. pg 32.
  3. World Health Organization (2009) WHO Guidelines on Hand Hygiene in Health Care. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization Press.

 

Call Now to learn more

Click here to visit our bathroom supply (Including Hand Sanitizer)

 

 

 

 

 


It’s dirty out there, Is your soap clean?

Many soap dispensers in public places are contaminated with potentially harmful bacteria.

Washing with contaminated soap increase the concentrations on people’s hands and on the surfaces they touch.

Refillable Bulk Soap Puts the Health of Washroom Users and the Image of Building Owners at Risk

A recent study has shown that hands can have as much as 25 times more germs after washing with refillable bulk soap than before washing.

Refillable bulk soap is the kind of washroom soap that’s typically poured from a gallon jug into an open dispenser reservoir. Find out how this soap can put your health at risk, then take action to help stop the threat

Refillable bulk soap is messy and labor intensive, and has been proven susceptible to bacterial contamination that can lead to a range of health issues. The refillable bulk soap risk was highlighted as part of a CNN report on The 8 Germiest Places at the Mall, on November 26, 2011.

The Risk

  • The germs identified in bulks soap have led to infections and fatalities in immunocompromised individuals
  • The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC),1 Health Canada,2 and the World Health Organization (WHO)3 have all recognized the bacterial contamination risk of “topping off” refillable bulk soap dispensers, and have issued guidelines against the practice.

The Image

In addition to the health risk posed to tenants and washroom users, refillable bulk soap can negatively affect the image of buildings and washrooms. The pouring of soup into multiple dispensers is slow and can leave a soapy mess. The extended labor time and product waste translate to cost issues, impacting customers’ bottom lines.

The Safe, Smart and Sustainable Alternative

Building owners and facility managers have an alternative that addresses the problems associated with refillable bulk soaps. GOJO SANITARY SEALED™ Refills are factory sealed to help lock out germs. It’s the sealed soap system that’s better for people, the planet and the bottom line of customers.

Read the original article and study here.

Contact your Green Guard representative today for a free consultation.

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Guideline for Hand Hygiene in Health-Care Settings: Recommendations of the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee and the HICPAC/SHEA/APIC/IDSA Hand Hygiene Task Force. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. October 25, 2002 / Vol. 51 / No. RR-16. Accessed at http://www.cdc.gov/handhygiene/Guidelines.html on May 18, 2010.
  2. Health Canada Guidance Document for Human-Use Antiseptic Drugs. December 2009. pg 32.
  3. World Health Organization (2009) WHO Guidelines on Hand Hygiene in Health Care. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization Press.

 

Call Now to learn more

Click here to visit our bathroom supply store

 

 

 

 


Is your soap clean?

Many soap dispensers in public places are contaminated with potentially harmful bacteria.

Washing with contaminated soap increase the concentrations on people’s hands and on the surfaces they touch.

Refillable Bulk Soap Puts the Health of Washroom Users and the Image of Building Owners at Risk

A recent study has shown that hands can have as much as 25 times more germs after washing with refillable bulk soap than before washing.

Refillable bulk soap is the kind of washroom soap that’s typically poured from a gallon jug into an open dispenser reservoir. Find out how this soap can put your health at risk, then take action to help stop the threat

Refillable bulk soap is messy and labor intensive, and has been proven susceptible to bacterial contamination that can lead to a range of health issues. The refillable bulk soap risk was highlighted as part of a CNN report on The 8 Germiest Places at the Mall, on November 26, 2011.

The Risk

  • The germs identified in bulks soap have led to infections and fatalities in immunocompromised individuals
  • The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC),1 Health Canada,2 and the World Health Organization (WHO)3 have all recognized the bacterial contamination risk of “topping off” refillable bulk soap dispensers, and have issued guidelines against the practice.

The Image

In addition to the health risk posed to tenants and washroom users, refillable bulk soap can negatively affect the image of buildings and washrooms. The pouring of soup into multiple dispensers is slow and can leave a soapy mess. The extended labor time and product waste translate to cost issues, impacting customers’ bottom lines.

The Safe, Smart and Sustainable Alternative

Building owners and facility managers have an alternative that addresses the problems associated with refillable bulk soaps. GOJO SANITARY SEALED™ Refills are factory sealed to help lock out germs. It’s the sealed soap system that’s better for people, the planet and the bottom line of customers.

Read the original article and study here.

Contact your Green Guard representative today for a free consultation.

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Guideline for Hand Hygiene in Health-Care Settings: Recommendations of the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee and the HICPAC/SHEA/APIC/IDSA Hand Hygiene Task Force. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. October 25, 2002 / Vol. 51 / No. RR-16. Accessed at http://www.cdc.gov/handhygiene/Guidelines.html on May 18, 2010.
  2. Health Canada Guidance Document for Human-Use Antiseptic Drugs. December 2009. pg 32.
  3. World Health Organization (2009) WHO Guidelines on Hand Hygiene in Health Care. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization Press.

Hand Washing Can Save Lives

Keeping hands clean through improved hand hygiene is one of the most important steps we can take to avoid getting sick and spreading germs to others. Many diseases and conditions are spread by not washing hands with soap and clean, running water. If clean, running water is not accessible, as is common in many parts of the world, use soap and available water. If soap and water are unavailable, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol to clean hands.

When should you wash your hands?

According to the CDC, you should should wash your hands before and after the following:

  • Before, during, and after preparing food
  • Before eating food
  • Before and after caring for someone who is sick
  • Before and after treating a cut or wound
  • After using the toilet
  • After changing diapers or cleaning up a child who has used the toilet
  • After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing
  • After touching an animal, animal feed, or animal waste
  • After handling pet food or pet treats
  • After touching garbage

How should you wash your hands?

  • Wet your hands with clean, running water (warm or cold), turn off the tap, and apply soap.
  • Lather your hands by rubbing them together with the soap. Be sure to lather the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails.
  • Scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the “Happy Birthday” song from beginning to end twice.
  • Rinse your hands well under clean, running water.
  • Dry your hands using a clean towel or air dry them

Here’s the science behind the recommendations

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