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How can your hands possibly have 25% more germs after washing?…

Many soap dispensers in public places are contaminated with potentially harmful bacteria.

Washing with contaminated hand soap increase the concentrations on people’s hands and on the surfaces they touch.  Refillable Bulk Hand Soap Puts the Health of Washroom Users and the Image of Building Owners at Risk.

A recent study has shown that hands can have as much as 25 times more germs after washing with refillable bulk soap than before washing.

Refillable bulk soap is the kind of washroom hand soap that’s typically poured from a gallon jug into an open dispenser reservoir. Find out how this soap can put your health at risk, then take action to help stop the threat

Refillable bulk hand soap is messy and labor intensive, and has been proven susceptible to bacterial contamination that can lead to a range of health issues. The refillable bulk soap risk was highlighted as part of a CNN report on The 8 Germiest Places at the Mall, on November 26, 2011.

The Risk

  • The germs identified in bulks soap have led to infections and fatalities in immunocompromised individuals
  • The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC),1 Health Canada,2 and the World Health Organization (WHO)3 have all recognized the bacterial contamination risk of “topping off” refillable bulk soap dispensers, and have issued guidelines against the practice.

The Image

In addition to the health risk posed to tenants and washroom users, refillable bulk soap can negatively affect the image of buildings and washrooms. The pouring of soup into multiple dispensers is slow and can leave a soapy mess. The extended labor time and product waste translate to cost issues, impacting customers’ bottom lines.

The Safe, Smart and Sustainable Alternative

Building owners and facility managers have an alternative that addresses the problems associated with refillable bulk soaps. GOJO SANITARY SEALED™ Refills are factory sealed to help lock out germs. It’s the sealed soap system that’s better for people, the planet and the bottom line of customers.

Read the original article and study here.

Contact your Green Guard representative today for a free consultation.

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Guideline for Hand Hygiene in Health-Care Settings: Recommendations of the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee and the HICPAC/SHEA/APIC/IDSA Hand Hygiene Task Force. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. October 25, 2002 / Vol. 51 / No. RR-16. Accessed at http://www.cdc.gov/handhygiene/Guidelines.html on May 18, 2010. Hand Sanitizer.
  2. Health Canada Guidance Document for Human-Use Antiseptic Drugs. December 2009. pg 32.
  3. World Health Organization (2009) WHO Guidelines on Hand Hygiene in Health Care. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization Press.

 

Call Now to learn more

Click here to visit our bathroom supply (Including Hand Sanitizer)

 

 

 

 

 


Understanding Hi-Viz Apparel Requirements

WestChestergear.com VIZ UP - STAND OUT
WestChestergear.com VIZ UP – STAND OUT

ANSI/ISEA 107-2015

The first thing to understand is the ANSI/ISEA 107-2015 standard. This is a voluntary standard that provides guidelines on what qualifies as an approved fluorescent material; and what level of coverage and reflective tape are required to qualify as for various classes and types of garments.

This standard was designed for industries like utility, emergency responders, maintenance, construction, airport personnel and many roadside workers exposed to potential injuries due to low visibility on the job.

ANSI Hi-VIZ GARMENT CLASSES AND TYPES

ANSI 107 establishes four performance classes (Class 1, Class 2, Class 3, and Class E) and three garment types (Type O, Type R and Type P). Performance class and garment type are co-dependent, which means that to qualify under the ANSI standard, the apparel must have both a class and a type (not just one or the other).

Performance Class 1 offers the minimum amount of high-visibility materials needed to differentiate the wearer from non-complex work environments. On the other side of the spectrum is Class 3, which offers the greatest amount of high-visibility materials to allow for the best definition of the human form in both complex backgrounds and through a full range of movement. In addition, Class E describes pants or bibs that do not qualify as meeting the requirements of any of the other classes when worn alone, however when they are worn together with a Class 2 or Class 3 garment, the overall classification of the ensemble is Class 3.

Garment Type O is intended for work that takes place off-road or in controlled environments, such as parking lots, festivals, warehouses and factories. Garment Type R is intended for roadways or other environments with moving traffic or equipment, and is the minimum level of protection permitted for workers exposed to roadway rights-of-way, including roadway, construction, transportation, traffic-control, DOT, and airport ramp workers. This garment type represents the vast majority of hi-viz apparel on the market. Finally, Type P garments are intended for public safety workers, including emergency/incident response, police, fire, and EMS. Type P garments are permitted to be worn in the same environments as Type R garments, however they make accommodations for the additional gear required by those professions.

Contact Green Guard for a free consultation of your safety and PPE program.

Source: WestChester Gear


3 Reasons Everyone Should Learn CPR

900 Americans die every day from Sudden Cardiac Arrest

 

95% of victims die before reaching a hospital

 

4 minutes – Brain death starts to occur within 4 minutes, the average response time of EMS is 8 minutes.

 

Train now to save a life in the future

CPR/First Aid – Corporate and Group Classes June 25th – 29th

Green Guard offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, Green Guard’s CPR, AED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2 year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Click Here For more information on CPR

Click Here For more information on AED’s

Chat Now – Click the “Live Chat” button on the right hand side of your screen


4 Back Safety Quick Tips for National Safety Month

Safety First

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), more than one million workers experience back injuries each year. One-fourth of all workers compensation indemnity claims are a result of back injuries. Low back pain is one of the most common reasons that people miss work, second only to the common cold. In America, we spend more than $100 billion annually in medical bills, disability and lost productivity at work from back injuries and illnesses. More importantly, this problem causes unnecessary discomfort and pain to workers which can have a devastating effect on their lifestyle and ability to work. A BLS survey shows that 75% of back injuries occurred while performing lifting tasks, which underscores the importance of reducing back injuries caused by lifting.

 

#1 – Work Smart

 

  • Always warm – Up your back and legs before performing any lifting task! We are ALL athletes in life, so we need to warm-up our body to improve performance and to reduce the risk of injury. It’s important to prepare your body for work.
  • Low Back Rotation Stretch – Stand with hands on hips. Stabilizing the hips and legs, gently roll your upper body forward, right, backward, and left to stretch your lower back. Perform 5 slow circles gradually expanding the circle each time. Repeat in the opposite direction.
  • Hamstring & Achilles Stretch – Position your body with one leg forward and the toes of that foot raised up. Keep your back straight while you bend forward at the waist. You should feel a stretch in the back of your thigh and knee. Then shift your weight onto your forward leg and bend the knee, keep the back leg straight and heel on the floor. Hold each stretch for 20 seconds. Perform each stretch 2 times for each leg.

 

#2 – Before You Lift

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Know what you are lifting and how you will lift it.
  • Be aware of the weight of the object.
  • Determine whether or not it’s safe to lift on your own.
  • Make sure the work area is flat, dry and clear of debris. CHECK YOUR PATHWAY
  • Make sure the lift pathway is clear.
  • Remove any tripping hazards or debris.
  • Check for any wet or slick surfaces.

 

#3 – USE ERGONOMIC EQUIPMENT

  • Use lift assists, forklift, dolly, cart, hand truck or hoist.
  • Make sure you are trained before using the equipment.

 

#4 – GET HELP WHEN NEEDED

  • When lifting awkward or heavy loads, utilize a two-person lift.
  • Make sure you lift at the same time and keep the load level. WEAR PROPER PPE
  • Wear proper required protective shoes and gloves.

 

Contact Green Guard today to help you with your safety and PPE needs.

Call 800-869-6970 to speak with a safety specialist

Click here to email a safety specialist

Click Here for webChat

 

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4 BIG Reasons You Should Know CPR

Why the big deal about CPR?

Here are fours big reasons CPR is so important.

1. SCA (Sudden Cardiac Arrest) is the third leading cause of death in the U.S.

2. Approximately 356,000 people of all ages experience SCA each year

3. 9 out of 10 victims die

4. Effective bystanders intervention can triple survival rates

 

CPR/First Aid – Corporate and Group Classes June 4th –  June 8th

Green Guard offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, Green Guard’s CPR, AED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2 year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

For more information;

Call 800-380-9119

Click here to Email

CHAT, click on the Live Chat button on the right hand side of your screen 

 


It’s dirty out there, Is your soap clean?

Many soap dispensers in public places are contaminated with potentially harmful bacteria.

Washing with contaminated soap increase the concentrations on people’s hands and on the surfaces they touch.

Refillable Bulk Soap Puts the Health of Washroom Users and the Image of Building Owners at Risk

A recent study has shown that hands can have as much as 25 times more germs after washing with refillable bulk soap than before washing.

Refillable bulk soap is the kind of washroom soap that’s typically poured from a gallon jug into an open dispenser reservoir. Find out how this soap can put your health at risk, then take action to help stop the threat

Refillable bulk soap is messy and labor intensive, and has been proven susceptible to bacterial contamination that can lead to a range of health issues. The refillable bulk soap risk was highlighted as part of a CNN report on The 8 Germiest Places at the Mall, on November 26, 2011.

The Risk

  • The germs identified in bulks soap have led to infections and fatalities in immunocompromised individuals
  • The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC),1 Health Canada,2 and the World Health Organization (WHO)3 have all recognized the bacterial contamination risk of “topping off” refillable bulk soap dispensers, and have issued guidelines against the practice.

The Image

In addition to the health risk posed to tenants and washroom users, refillable bulk soap can negatively affect the image of buildings and washrooms. The pouring of soup into multiple dispensers is slow and can leave a soapy mess. The extended labor time and product waste translate to cost issues, impacting customers’ bottom lines.

The Safe, Smart and Sustainable Alternative

Building owners and facility managers have an alternative that addresses the problems associated with refillable bulk soaps. GOJO SANITARY SEALED™ Refills are factory sealed to help lock out germs. It’s the sealed soap system that’s better for people, the planet and the bottom line of customers.

Read the original article and study here.

Contact your Green Guard representative today for a free consultation.

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Guideline for Hand Hygiene in Health-Care Settings: Recommendations of the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee and the HICPAC/SHEA/APIC/IDSA Hand Hygiene Task Force. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. October 25, 2002 / Vol. 51 / No. RR-16. Accessed at http://www.cdc.gov/handhygiene/Guidelines.html on May 18, 2010.
  2. Health Canada Guidance Document for Human-Use Antiseptic Drugs. December 2009. pg 32.
  3. World Health Organization (2009) WHO Guidelines on Hand Hygiene in Health Care. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization Press.

 

Call Now to learn more

Click Here for webChat

 

If you liked this post be sure to follow us:

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Fall Prevention In The Construction Industry

Construction Fall Protection

National Safety Stand-Down

Fatalities caused by falls from elevation continue to be a leading cause of death for construction employees, accounting for 370 of the 991 construction fatalities recorded in 2016 (BLS data). Those deaths were preventable. The National Safety Stand-Down raises fall hazard awareness across the country in an effort to stop fall fatalities and injuries.


A Safety Stand-Down is a voluntary event for employers to talk directly to employees about safety. Any workplace can hold a stand-down by taking a break to focus on “Fall Hazards” and reinforcing the importance of “Fall Prevention”. Employers of companies not exposed to fall hazards, can also use this opportunity to have a conversation with employees about the other job hazards they face, protective methods, and the company’s safety policies and goals. It can also be an opportunity for employees to talk to management about fall and other job hazards they see.

Who Can Participate?

Anyone who wants to prevent hazards in the workplace can participate in the Stand-Down. In past years, participants included commercial construction companies of all sizes, residential construction contractors, sub- and independent contractors, highway construction companies, general industry employers, the U.S. Military, other government participants, unions, employer’s trade associations, institutes, employee interest organizations, and safety equipment manufacturers.

Partners

OSHA is partnering with key groups to assist with this effort, including the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA), OSHA approved State Plans, State consultation programs, the Center for Construction Research and Training (CPWR), the American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE), the National Safety Council, the National Construction Safety Executives (NCSE), the U.S. Air Force, and the OSHA Training Institute (OTI) Education Centers.

How to Conduct a Safety Stand-Down and FAQ’s

Companies can conduct a Safety Stand-Down by taking a break to have a toolbox talk or another safety activity such as conducting safety equipment inspections, developing rescue plans, or discussing job specific hazards. Managers are encouraged to plan a stand-down that works best for their workplace anytime May 7-11, 2018. See Suggestions to Prepare for a Successful “Stand-Down” and Highlights from the Past Stand-Downs. OSHA also hosts an Events page with events that are free and open to the public to help employers and employees find events in your area.

Certificate of Participation

Employers will be able to provide feedback about their Stand-Down and download a Certificate of Participation following the Stand-Down.

Share Your Story With Us

If you want to share information with OSHA on your Safety Stand-Down, Fall Prevention Programs or suggestions on how we can improve future initiatives like this, please send your email to oshastanddown@dol.gov. Also share your Stand-Down story on social media, with the hashtag: #StandDown4Safety.

If you plan to host a free event that is open to the public, see OSHA’s Events page to submit the event details and to contact your Regional Stand-Down Coordinator.

Credit: https://www.osha.gov/StopFallsStandDown/

National Safety Stand-Down To Prevent Falls in Construction

Warf Event - OSHA/Clark Construction

National Safety Stand-Down

Fatalities caused by falls from elevation continue to be a leading cause of death for construction employees, accounting for 370 of the 991 construction fatalities recorded in 2016 (BLS data). Those deaths were preventable. The National Safety Stand-Down raises fall hazard awareness across the country in an effort to stop fall fatalities and injuries.


A Safety Stand-Down is a voluntary event for employers to talk directly to employees about safety. Any workplace can hold a stand-down by taking a break to focus on “Fall Hazards” and reinforcing the importance of “Fall Prevention”. Employers of companies not exposed to fall hazards, can also use this opportunity to have a conversation with employees about the other job hazards they face, protective methods, and the company’s safety policies and goals. It can also be an opportunity for employees to talk to management about fall and other job hazards they see.

Who Can Participate?

Anyone who wants to prevent hazards in the workplace can participate in the Stand-Down. In past years, participants included commercial construction companies of all sizes, residential construction contractors, sub- and independent contractors, highway construction companies, general industry employers, the U.S. Military, other government participants, unions, employer’s trade associations, institutes, employee interest organizations, and safety equipment manufacturers.

Partners

OSHA is partnering with key groups to assist with this effort, including the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA), OSHA approved State Plans, State consultation programs, the Center for Construction Research and Training (CPWR), the American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE), the National Safety Council, the National Construction Safety Executives (NCSE), the U.S. Air Force, and the OSHA Training Institute (OTI) Education Centers.

How to Conduct a Safety Stand-Down and FAQ’s

Companies can conduct a Safety Stand-Down by taking a break to have a toolbox talk or another safety activity such as conducting safety equipment inspections, developing rescue plans, or discussing job specific hazards. Managers are encouraged to plan a stand-down that works best for their workplace anytime May 7-11, 2018. See Suggestions to Prepare for a Successful “Stand-Down” and Highlights from the Past Stand-Downs. OSHA also hosts an Events page with events that are free and open to the public to help employers and employees find events in your area.

Certificate of Participation

Employers will be able to provide feedback about their Stand-Down and download a Certificate of Participation following the Stand-Down.

Share Your Story With Us

If you want to share information with OSHA on your Safety Stand-Down, Fall Prevention Programs or suggestions on how we can improve future initiatives like this, please send your email to oshastanddown@dol.gov. Also share your Stand-Down story on social media, with the hashtag: #StandDown4Safety.

If you plan to host a free event that is open to the public, see OSHA’s Events page to submit the event details and to contact your Regional Stand-Down Coordinator.

Credit: https://www.osha.gov/StopFallsStandDown/

It’s Time to Thank Members of the Nation’s Most-Trusted Profession

It’s Time to Thank Members of the Nation’s Most-Trusted Profession, Nurses.

 

For the past 16 years, the Gallup poll has named nurses as the most-trusted profession in its ratings of honesty and ethical standards in professions.

The poll showed 82% of Americans describe nurses’ ethics as high or very high. By comparison, 60% rated members of Congress as low or very low for honesty and ethical standards.

 

Some restaurants across the country are showing nurses a little love by offering freebies and discounts for National Nurses Week this week.

The week goes through May 12, which was the birthday of Florence Nightingale, the founder of modern nursing.

Nurse appreciation deals

Participation can vary. To be on the safe side, check with your closest restaurants.

CinnabonThrough May 12, nurses get one free Cinnabon Classic Roll, MiniBon Roll or a four-count BonBites when they show their badge at participating locations.

Culver’sThere’s not a nationwide promotion and individual locations may offer specials throughout the week for nurses with a valid ID. One way to check is by calling your closest location and some may post specials on the location’s details page at www.culvers.com.

Jimboy’s Tacos: Nurses who show a valid employee ID get a buy-one-get-one free deal on the California-based chain’s Original Ground Beef Tacos through Saturday. Limit three free tacos per nurse at participating locations.

Pollo TropicalThrough Saturday, nurses get 25% off any purchase when they show their healthcare ID and use code 651 at checkout, according to a Facebook post.

Potbelly Sandwich ShopThrough Saturday, show your medical ID or wear your scrubs for a free fountain drink or cookie with the purchase of a sandwich or salad. Limited to one per customer.

More deals: Individual franchises of national chains including Chick-fil-A might also have freebies and specials for nurses. Locally-owned businesses also will honor nurses and one of the easiest ways to find out is to check restaurants’ social media channels.

Credit; Kelly Tyco – USAToday.com


CPR/First Aid Classes – Corporate and Group Classes May 21st – 25th

Is your team ready to save a life?

CPR/First Aid – Corporate and Group Classes May 21st – 25th

Green Guard offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, Green Guard’s CPR, AED and first aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2 year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

For more information;

Call 800-380-9119

Click here to Email