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4 Reasons Why ForkLift Checklists Are Critical

OSHA requires forklift trucks to be inspected at least once per day, or after every shift if in constant use

(Powered Industrial Truck OSHA Standard 29 CFR 1910.178(q)(7).

The inspection doesn’t have to be documented. However, there are four really good reasons why you should document the inspection:

 

 

Having a pre-printed checklist ensures that no safety critical parts of the forklift are missed

 

 

 

Ensures consistency across the organization, regardless of experience, every operator conducts the inspection, in the same way, inspecting the same components

 

 

Consistency allows comparisons between forklifts in your organization so that you can identify trends and patterns

 

 

Finally and crucially, it provides evidence to an OSHA inspector that you are complying with the standard

 

The operator should conduct a pre-start visual check with the key off and then perform an operational check with the engine running. The vehicle should only be placed in service if it passes this inspection. Any vehicle found to be defective in any way must be taken out of service immediately. Defects should be recorded and reported to a Supervisor.

The challenge that all safety professionals seem to have is to first make certain the operator performs the check, and then that the supervisors are engaged in managing it – either to say ‘good job’, or ask why the check has not been done. Green Guard working with SG World USA’s patented solution solves these problems and offers a visible and simple way to make certain forklift safety checks happen every shift.

In support of the OSHA standard, ANSI Standard B56 requires “adequate maintenance facilities, personnel and procedures to be provided” when operating forklift trucks. Having an inspection program would be an important part of meeting this standard too.

 

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5 Forklift Safety Elements – Part 5 “Know About Load Basics”

Forklift Safety Elements – Know About Load Basics

OSHA advises operators to check loads before picking them up with the forks, ensuring the load’s stability and dimensions will allow for safe transport. Move squarely in front of the load and move the forks apart as far as possible before driving them under the load. Make sure to not overload and that the load is centered.

Slightly tilt the forklift mast backward before lifting. Lift the load enough to clear the floor or rack. For stacking, OSHA recommends lifting the load above the lower stack by about 10 centimeters, or 4 inches.

When placing a load, operators should be squarely in front of the placement destination.  Make sure the area is flat and stable, and don’t place heavy loads on top of light ones. Lower the forks upon placing the load, and then back the forklift away. As always, ensure the load is stable.

 

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Source:https://www.safetyandhealthmagazine.com/articles/16138-elements-of-forklift-safety


5 Forklift Safety Elements – Part 3 (Know The Machinery & Rules)

Know the machinery – and the rules

Although lift trucks and personal vehicles share some similarities, they ultimately are quite different.

Among the differences:

  • Open structure; the driver is not completely enclosed
  • Weights ranging from 9,000 to 30,000 pounds, with rough-terrain lift trucks at the heavier end
  • Traveling speeds of less than 20 mph, closer to a walking pace
  • Three-point suspension
  • More prone to tipping overloaded or not – and varying stability
  • Tighter turning radius for operating in tight spots

Operators should always wear seat belts. Neglecting to do so can cause an operator to be ejected from the forklift’s protective cage if the truck turns over, resulting in a possible serious injury or fatality.

An operator always should be aware of his or her surroundings on the job site, as the load or environment may obstruct visibility.

It’s vital that drivers are aware of and making eye contact with, pedestrians or other workers during operation. OSHA best practices for maintaining visibility include:

  • Keep a clear view.
  • Always look in the direction of travel.
  • Use spotters or aids such as rear-view mirrors to boost visibility.
  • Use headlights if working at night, outdoors or in areas in which additional lighting would improve visibility. OSHA requires forklifts to be equipped with headlights when general lighting is less than 2 lumens per square foot.

 

Stay tuned for Part – 4 “Understanding the stability triangle” coming next week.

 

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Source: https://www.safetyandhealthmagazine.com/articles/16138-elements-of-forklift-safety

 


5 Forklift Safety Elements – Part 2 (Performing Inspections)

5 elements of forklift safety – Part 2

Performing checkups

Operators are urged to inspect forklifts before each job, checking first the items that can be monitored without the engine running. Checkpoints should include seat belts, tires, lights, horn, brakes, backup alarms and fluid levels, as well as the moving and load-supporting parts of the forklift.

Kertzman said his agency commonly issues citations to companies that neglect to maintain forklifts in good working condition.

“It’s low-hanging fruit to have a beat-up truck sitting out there that any inspector can spot half a dozen things wrong with it from 40 feet away,” Kertzman said.

The Washington L&I citation process involves discussing the area(s) of code violation, explaining to the employer how the organization failed to comply and offering possible methods to resolve the issue.

“Then the employer is ultimately on the hook to decide what they’re going to do, and then make those changes in a timely fashion,” Kertzman said.

 

When to Perform Inspections

Whether it’s in a warehouse or outside, there are a few precautions you must take before you actually operate the lift. Your pre-shift checklist is one of the most important things you learn about during forklift safety training. Here is what these inspections entail.

When you go through forklift safety training, you’re taught that forklift safety inspections should be performed before every single shift. This does not mean that one safety inspection per day is all that is required. If there are multiple shifts per day, each operator must perform an inspection before their shift begins. This ensures the safety of the operator and everyone working in the space around them. These pre-shift checks can also help to prevent warehouse accidents that may damage goods or products. There are two types of pre-shift checks that must be done: a visual check and an operational pre-use check.

forklift training nj

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Visual Check

The visual check is to be done before you start the forklift. During this check, you are going over the general condition of the forklift:

  • Tires: Check tires for any noticeable damages like cuts or gouges. Ensure the tire pressure is at the optimum level for pneumatic tires.
  • Fluid Levels: Make sure that all fluid levels including oil, fuel, or water are where they need to be.
  • Battery: Ensure the battery is fully charged. Check for exposed wires or loose cable connectors.
  • Forks and Mast: Check for any physical damage to the forks or mast of the forklift including bends or cracks.
  • Seatbelt: Every sit-down forklift needs a seatbelt. Make sure it is working and there are no rips or tears.

Operational Pre-Use Check

The operational pre-use check is to be conducted when you turn the forklift on, before operating the lift. This check should include:

  • Lights: Ensure that both the headlights and warning lights are operational.
  • Horn: Test the horn to make sure it is loud and clear.
  • Hydraulic Hoses: Check to make sure they are secured.
  • Hour Meter & Gauges: Check to see if meters and gauges are working correctly.
  • Brakes: Check the breaks to ensure they stop the lift smoothly. Test the parking brake to see if it can hold against a slight acceleration. Double check the handbrake to make sure it is operational.
  • Hydraulic Controls: Ensure both the lift mechanism and tilt mechanism are operating smoothly by raising the forks all the way up and all the way back down, as well as tilting the mast all the way forward and then back again.
  • Steering: Turn the wheel to the left and to the right, making sure the wheels of the lift respond correctly.
  • Unusual Noises: Listen for abnormal sounds coming from the forklift.

If any issues are found during these pre-shift checks, they must be reported and the forklift in question must be taken out of commission until the issues are resolved.

forklift training near me

Workplace Check

Before you start operating the lift truck, you should always do a workplace check as well. A workplace inspection ensures that your work environment is clear of any obstructions and safe for operation. During this check, you should keep these things in mind:

  • Ground Conditions: Make sure you’re aware of the ground conditions in the warehouse. Look out for any slopes, spills that cause the floor to be slippery, or ledges that could get in the way of the lift or cause it to tip over.
  • Overhead Obstructions: Ensure that there are no overhead obstructions low enough to impede the forklift or the load being carried.
  • Personnel: Be aware of how many people are currently working in the warehouse and know where they are at all times while operating the lift.
  • Machinery: Always be aware of other forklifts operating in the same space or any other machinery that is being used during your shift.

Forklift Safety Training for Your Business

OSHA requires that these safety checks be conducted on every forklift before every single shift. These checks ensure the safety of the operators and those working around them. OSHA can and will request proof of inspections for up to four years prior. Because of this, it is recommended that you keep a good record of inspection sheets along with any corresponding repairs that were made. This way OSHA and insurance companies will know repairs were made as soon as a machine broke down. For forklifts that do not pass these inspections for any reason, it is crucial that repairs are done as soon as possible. Every company that uses forklifts in its daily operations needs to have an official checklist policy to ensure consistency and safety at all times.

 

Stay tuned for Part – 3 “Know the machinery and the rules” coming next week.

 

Call Now to speak with a Green Guard Safety Training Specialist

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Source: https://www.safetyandhealthmagazine.com/articles/16138-elements-of-forklift-safety

Source: https://cnclifttruck.com/forklift-safety-training-inspections/


5 Forklift Safety Elements – Part 1

5 elements of forklift safety – Part 1

Train for safety

OSHA estimates that 35,000 serious injuries and 62,000 non-serious injuries involving forklifts occur annually. Further, data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that 96 U.S. workers were killed in incidents involving forklifts in 2015.

A safety guide published by the Washington State Department of Labor & Industries states that workers without proper training and knowledge of forklift operation, as well as operators who maneuver forklifts carelessly, have an increased risk of injury or death.

A commitment to safety begins with proper training. The guide further states that “an untrained forklift operator can be as dangerous as an unlicensed driver of a motor vehicle.” OSHA’s Powered Industrial Trucks Standard – 29 CFR 1910.178 – establishes that “the employer shall ensure that each powered industrial truck operator is competent to operate a powered industrial truck safely, as demonstrated by the successful completion of the training and evaluation” outlined in the standard.

OSHA requires training programs to combine formal instruction, such as lectures and written material, with practical training and a workplace performance evaluation. Washington L&I Safety and Health Technical Specialist Drew Kertzman said that a prevalence of qualified experts and resources has allowed for improved training in recent years. Still, operators should be mindful of the differences between various types and models of forklifts and lift trucks.

“The gap that I’ve seen in the past is just presuming that once you’re trained on one forklift, you automatically know how to maneuver all forklifts,” Kertzman said. “As you get larger and larger (forklifts), they operate differently, and as you go from model to model, they are a little bit different.”

 

Stay tuned for next weeks Part – 2 “Perform Checkups”

 

Call Now to speak with a Green Guard Safety Specialist

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Source: https://www.safetyandhealthmagazine.com/articles/16138-elements-of-forklift-safety