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Is your team CPR ready to save a life?

CPR/First Aid – Corporate and Group Classes

 Anyone can learn CPR, is your firm ready to save a life? #cprreadytosavealife

Green Guard offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, Green Guard’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

CPR classes are a great team building opportunity too!

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CPR Saves lives at Food 4 Less

Medford, OR. Fire-Rescue honored four distinct community members, as well as local business, Food 4 Less, on Thursday for their heroic and fast-acting efforts that saved two lives in December.

Over the Christmas holiday, two separate incidents that both involved people going into cardiac arrest, happened a week apart at the same Medford Food 4 Less. According to Medford Fire-Rescue, both patients required a “Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and Automated External Defibrillation (AED).”

The first incident, on December 22nd, began as a reported car crashing into the Food 4 Less building. Several employees and a customer moved quickly to check on the driver and realized she was not responsive or breathing.

They called for help, turned off the car, and pulled her out to begin CPR. One of the employees ran inside the building to retrieve the closest AED. The first arriving Medford Police officer on-scene assisted with CPR until Medford Fire-Rescue firefighters arrived to relieve them. “We happened to be walking by going in shopping and just rendered care to her as we saw fit to what’s going on,” Cliff Maris, local United States Postal Service employee said.

Maris has a history of valiant acts and medical training from his six years in the air force as a Medical Evacuation Specialist 452nd, who served during the first war in Iraq. Maris said helping and taking care of people are the two reasons that motivated him to join the military. “It’s just the training we had in the military that [tells us to] go to it and then take care of the problem instead of running away from it,” Maris said.

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“Due to the rapid and effective CPR performance, the patient arrived to the hospital with a pulse, and a chance,” said Melissa Cano, Emergency Manager for Medford Fire-Rescue.

A week later on December 28th, a Food 4 Less employee was alerted of an unresponsive person, hunched over on a bench. The very same employee who assisted in the previous week’s incident again responded, and was instrumental in the life-saving efforts. They acted swiftly: calling for help, starting CPR, and even issuing a shock from the store AED before the first responders arrived.

“Both incidents are a true testament to the willingness of those in our community to help a person in need,” said Cano. “Medford Fire-Rescue is not only proud to recognize these individuals, but highlight the importance of being properly trained in CPR. Every community member can potentially assist others, and even, save a life.”

 

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Heimlich Maneuver – How to do it

The Heimlich maneuver uses abdominal thrusts to force objects out of the throat. Underneath the lungs is a muscle called the diaphragm. This muscle contracts to move the lungs, helping them exhale air.                                                                       

Fast facts on the Heimlich maneuver:

  • When a person chokes, they cannot inhale or exhale air, which is why it is not possible to cough an object out during a choking episode.
  • Until the 1970s, there was no widely accepted research-based strategy for managing choking.
  • People should only ever carry out the Heimlich maneuver on someone who is choking.

How to do the Heimlich maneuver

There are four ways to perform the Heimlich maneuver, depending on the age and needs of the choking person. The underlying action with each approach is the same: using the muscles of the diaphragm to force the object out of the throat.

Conscious adult or child

If the adult or child over the age of 1 is conscious but cannot speak, cough, or breathe, perform the Heimlich maneuver immediately, following these steps:

  1. Stand behind the person who is choking, arms wrapped around their waist.
  2. Make one hand into a fist. Position the thumb side of the fist against the person’s stomach, below their ribs and above the belly button. It is possible to feel the diaphragm muscle.
  3. Put the other hand over the fist and push into this muscle with a rapid, forceful, upward thrust.
  4. Continue abdominal thrusts until the object comes out.

Unconscious adult or child

If the child or adult is unconscious or cannot sit or stand, perform these steps:

  1. Position the choking person flat on their back.
  2. Sit on the person’s thighs, facing toward them
  3. Place one hand on top of the other, and then position the heel of the hand over their diaphragm, just below their rib cage and above their belly button.
  4. Lean onto the hands, pushing up and in.
  5. Continue repeating thrusts until the object is coughed out.

Performing Heimlich on yourself

If you choke while alone, or when there is no one to help, do the following:

  1. Make a fist, and with thumbs pointing inward, position the fist against the diaphragm – under the rib cage and above the navel.
  2. Push in and up until the object is expelled.
  3. If unable to do this or it does not work lean over a solid object, such as a counter or chair. Position the edge at the diaphragm to push in and up. Move slightly forward and backward to produce thrusts.
  4. Repeat until the object is dislodged.

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Don’t just think about learning CPR/First Aid – Schedule your class now and get certified

Workplace Environment CPR

CPR/First Aid – Corporate and Group Classes

 Anyone can learn CPR, is your firm ready to save a life? #cprreadytosavealife

Green Guard offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, Green Guard’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Call Now to speak with a Green Guard First Aid/CPR Specialist

Click Here to learn more about First Aid/CPR

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First Aid Service – How a service program can save you time and money…

Have you ever utilized a first aid service before? Do you know that such a service exists?

Often times businesses attempt to handle the first aid and safety needs for their company by themselves. Perhaps this is possible when a company is small and has only a few employees. However, through the challenges of a company growing and becoming more viable in its industry, first aid and safety needs could begin to take a backseat, leaving them vulnerable.

Having a first aid service company manage your first aid and safety needs can be very beneficial.

  1. Allow’s you to focus on your business, its growth and more complex issues that come with that.

  2. Ensure that you have an adequate supply of products to meet or exceed the latest A.N.S.I or O.S.H.A standards, and help you understand and comply with those standards.

  3. Having this service could also have a positive impact on employee morale and increased productivity.

In this article, we are going to go over the recommended fill list for an industrial first aid cabinet.

The areas of first aid that your business first aid cabinet should cover as A.N.S.I defines them are:

  1. Minor woundsBandages
    • Antiseptics
  2. Major woundsCompresses
    • Gauze
    • Tape
  3. BurnsBurn gels
    • Sprays
    • Ointments
    • ice packs
  4. Eye injuriesEyewash
    • Eye cups
  5. Personal comfortAnalgesics
      • Ibuprofen
      • Non-aspirin
      • Aspirin

 

Putting together a first aid program yourself that meets the above areas can be a real challenge. It could be difficult to source all of these items, especially in single unit dose packaging that helps to mitigate cross-contamination. Most items sold and purchased through pharmacies or large box stores are meant for personal or home first aid kits.

A service company like Green Guard will meet with you and your team to design a program based on your needs and environment. Knowing that your first aid and safety needs are being handled by professionals from Green Guard, will allow you to put your mind at rest and focus on other areas of your business.

 

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Why you should know the difference between Sudden Cardiac Arrest and a Heart attack…

Often times sudden cardiac arrest and heart attack are used synonymously. In truth, the two are very different from one another.

Sudden cardiac arrest is when the heart malfunctions and suddenly stops beating. A heart attack is when blood flow to the heart is blocked.

In short, a heart attack is about “circulation” and sudden cardiac arrest is an “electrical” problem.

 

Heart Attack

A heart attack occurs when a blocked artery prevents oxygen-rich blood from reaching a section of the heart. If the blocked artery is not reopened quickly, the part of the heart normally nourished begins to die. The longer a person goes without receiving treatment, greater damage will be done to the heart. Symptoms can occur almost immediately. Materializing as a sharp pain in the chest, and may travel to the arm, shoulder and back. The symptoms may occur slowly over days or weeks prior to a heart attack. These symptoms often appear as shortness of breath or heartburn. Unlike with sudden cardiac arrest, the heart usually doesn’t stop beating during a heart attack.

 

Sudden Cardiac Arrest

Sudden cardiac arrest occurs suddenly and very often without warning. It is when the heart abruptly begins to beat in an abnormal or irregular rhythm called (arrhythmia). Without organized electrical activity in the heart muscle, there is no consistent contraction of the ventricles, which results in the heart’s inability to generate an adequate cardiac output. With its pumping action disrupted, the heart cannot pump blood to the brain, lungs and other organs. Within seconds a person will lose consciousness and have no pulse. Death can occur within minutes if the victim does not receive immediate treatment.

Heart attacks do increase the risk for sudden cardiac arrest. Other heart conditions can also increase the likelihood for sudden cardiac arrest as well. These conditions include a thickened heart cardiomyopathyheart failure, arrhythmias, particularly ventricular fibrillation, and long Q-T syndrome.

Sudden Cardiac Arrest

A cardiac arrest victim can be saved if treated immediately. First, **call 9-1-1 for emergency medical services. Then get a Defibrillator (AED) automated external defibrillator if one is available and use it as soon as it arrives. Begin CPR immediately and continue until professional emergency medical personnel arrive. If two people are available, one should begin CPR immediately while the other calls 9-1-1 and finds the Defibrillator.

Sudden cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death

There are over 320,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur annually in the United States. By performing Hands-Only CPR, you can double or even triple a victim’s chance of survival.

Learn CPR today! CPR Certification

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It’s a New Year – Is Your First Aid Kit Compliant? Here’s a quick guide…

5.1.1 Class A Kit’s

Class A first aid kits are intended to provide a basic range of products to deal with most common types of injuries encountered in the workplace including major wounds, minor wounds (cuts and abrasions), minor burns and eye injuries. First aid kits designated as Class A shall contain the assortment of compliant supplies in the quantities specified in the table below.

FA Small Cab

ANSI First Aid Standards

5.1.2 Class B Kits

Class B kits are intended to provide a broader range and quantity of supplies to deal with injuries encountered in more populated, complex and/or high-risk workplace environments. First aid kits designated as Class B shall contain the assortment of compliant supplies in the quantities specified in the table below.

 

ANSI Class B Cabinet

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One New Years Resolution For Anyone – Learn CPR

Workplace Environment CPR

CPR/First Aid – Corporate and Group Classes

Here’s a Life-Saving New Years Resolution for anyone – Learn CPR

Green Guard offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, Green Guard’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Call Now to speak with a Green Guard First Aid/CPR Specialist

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The Perfect Gift for Christmas – First Aid/CPR Certification

CPR/First Aid – Corporate and Group Classes

Need a new idea for the perfect Christmas gift for your employees?

Green Guard offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, Green Guard’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Call Now to speak with a Green Guard First Aid/CPR Specialist

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3 different types of bleeding and how to control them

First aid responders should be competent at dealing with major blood loss. There are broadly three different types of bleeding: arterial, venous and capillary.

How much blood do we have?
The average adult human as anywhere between 8 and 12 pints of blood depending on their body size.

Remember that children have less blood than adults, and as such cannot afford to lose the same amount – a baby only has around 1 pint of blood.

What are the different types of bleeding?

Arterial

With this type of bleeding, the blood is typically bright red to yellowish in color, due to the high degree of oxygenation. A wound to a major artery could result in blood ‘spurting’ in time with the heartbeat, several meters and the blood volume will rapidly reduce.

Venous
This blood is flowing from a damaged vein. As a result, it is blackish in color (due to the lack of oxygen it transports) and flows in a steady manner. Caution is still indicated: while the blood loss may not be arterial, it can still be quite substantial, and can occur with surprising speed without intervention.

Capillary
Bleeding from capillaries occurs in all wounds. Although the flow may appear fast at first, blood loss is usually slight and is easily controlled. Bleeding from a capillary could be described as a ‘trickle’ of blood.

The key first aid treatment for all of these types of bleeding is direct pressure over the wound.

Call 911 if you have a medical emergency

 

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