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National Teen Driver Safety Week

National Teen Driver Safety Week

This week and every week, parents should have conversations with their teens about the important rules they need to follow to stay safe behind the wheel of a passenger car, truck, or SUV. These rules address the greatest dangers for teen drivers: alcohol, inconsistent or no seat belt use, distracted and drowsy driving, speeding, and number of passengers.

The Problem: Too many teens are dying on our roads

  • Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for teens (15 to 18 years old) in the United States – ahead of all other types of injury, disease, or violence.
  • There were 1,972 teen drivers of passenger vehicles involved in fatal motor vehicle traffic crashes in 2015. An estimated 99,000 teen passenger vehicle drivers were injured in motor vehicle traffic crashes.

Here is a great resource to help keep your teen driver safe on the roads https://www.nhtsa.gov/road-safety/teen-driving

Source: https://www.trafficsafetymarketing.gov/get-materials/teen-safety/national-teen-driver-safety-week

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Happy Halloween From Green Guard First Aid

Happy Halloween

Green Guard First Aid & Safety wants to wish you a Happy and Safe Halloween. Here are a few tips to stay safe on this spooky eve.

Drive Extra Safely on Halloween

  1. Slow down and be especially alert in residential neighborhoods. Children are excited on Halloween and may move in unpredictable ways.
  2. Take extra time to look for kids at intersections, on medians and on curbs.
  3. Enter and exit driveways and alleys slowly and carefully.
  4. Eliminate any distractions inside your car so you can concentrate on the road and your surroundings.
  5. Drive slowly, anticipate heavy pedestrian traffic and turn your headlights on earlier in the day to spot children from greater distances.
  6. Popular trick-or-treating hours are 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. so be especially alert for kids during those hours.

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8 Tips For Safer Driving This 4th of July

NSC Urges Drivers to Take Control of Their Safety This July 4th

National Safety Council calculations indicate 164 people may be killed on the road during the upcoming Fourth of July holiday period, and an additional 18,600 may be seriously injured in crashes.

The one-day holiday period this year will begin at 6 p.m. ET Tuesday, July 3, and will end at 11:59 p.m. ET Wednesday, July 4.

“By sharing these estimates, the National Safety Council hopes to highlight the importance of being a safe, sober and attentive driver so that everyone can safely celebrate this July 4 holiday,” said Deborah A.P. Hersman, president and CEO of the National Safety Council. “Independence Day should be about spending time with loved ones and watching fireworks, not about dealing with the tragic aftermath of a car crash.”

Unintentional, preventable injuries – commonly known as “accidents” – claimed a record high 161,374 lives in 2016 to become the third leading cause of death in the United States for the first time in recorded history. In fact, 2016 marked a 14 percent increase in roadway deaths since 2014 – the largest two-year jump in 53 years.  

 

Drivers can take measures to protect themselves. 8 Tips to ensure a safer holiday weekend include:

    1. Practicing defensive driving. Buckle up, designate a sober driver or arrange alternative transportation, get plenty of sleep to avoid fatigue, and drive attentively, avoiding distractions. Visit nsc.org for defensive driving tips.

    2. Recognizing the dangers of drugged driving, including impairment from prescription opioids. Visit StopEverydayKillers.org to understand the impact of the nation’s opioid crisis.

    3. Staying engaged in teens’ driving habits. Visit DriveitHOME.org for resources.

    4. Learning about your vehicle’s safety systems and how to use them. Visit MyCarDoesWhat.org for information.

    5. Fixing recalls immediately. Visit ChecktoProtect.org to ensure your vehicle does not have an open recall.

    6. Asking lawmakers and state leaders to protect travelers on state roadways. Read the State of Safety report to find out which states have the strongest and weakest traffic safety laws.

    7. Joining the Road to Zero coalition to understand how safety professionals are addressing motor vehicle fatalities. Visit nsc.org/roadtozero to get involved.

   8. Looking before you lock a vehicle to ensure no child is left behind in the back seat. At least 18 kids have died in hot cars this year.

 

Call Now to speak with a Green Guard Workplace Safety Specialist

Click Here for Workplace Safety Training Courses

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Source: National Safety Council


Work Zone Safety: Everybody’s Responsibility

April 8th -12th is designated National Work Zone Awareness Week. This week is designed to bring attention to motorist and worker safety and mobility issues in work zones.

  • Over the last 5 years, 4,400 people have died and 200,000 injured in work zone crashes.
  • Drivers are the most frequent fatality in work zone crashes.
  • Most work zone fatalities involve working-age adults.
  • Rear-end crashes (running into the rear of a slowing or stopping vehicle) are the most common type of work zone crash.
  • Fatal work zone crashes occur most often in summer and fall.
  • The majority of fatal work zone crashes occurred on roads with speed limits greater than 50 mph.
  • Stopping distance for motor vehicles at 50 mph:

                   -Dry roadway300 ft

                   -Wet roadway400 ft

                   -Icy pavement1250 ft

  • A loaded 80,000 lb. tractor-trailer requires almost 50% more stopping distance.
  • It takes only an extra 25 seconds to cover 1 mile at 45 mph compared to 65 mph.

Tips for the Driver

  • Stay Alert and Minimize Distractions
  • Keep Your Headlights On
  • Pay Attention to the Road
  • Merge into the Proper Lane
  • Don’t Tailgate
  • Obey the Posted Speed Limit
  • Change Lanes Safely
  • Follow Instructions form Flaggers
  • Expect the Unexpected

BE PATIENT

Additional resources

FHWA-Developed Resources PDF

Trucking Safely Through Work Zones PDF

 

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