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Learn To Save a Life In 4 Hours – CPR Training, Are You Prepared?

CPR/First Aid Training – Corporate and Group Classes

Green Guard offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, Green Guard’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Looking for a Team Building opportunity? Learn to save a life while providing a great team-building exercise.

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It wasn’t his time:’ man performed CPR, saving life of neighbor in cardiac arrest

A man heard cries from his condo, and ran to help. He ended up saving his neighbor’s life!

After he heard screams coming from a nearby condo, Jeff Zilisch saw that his neighbor had collapsed. He used his CPR training to save him.

“It was being at the right place at the right time,” said Zilisch.

“My heart goes out to him,” said Tim Ridley, whose life was saved. “It’s just amazing.”

Tim Ridley

 

It happened in early August, as Zilisch cleaned his garage.

“Halfway across the parking lot, I realized, ‘Oh my gosh! This is not what I thought it was,'” said Zilisch.

Jeff Tilisch, Tim Ridley

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ridley was experiencing cardiac arrest. He was power washing his porch when he passed out.

“At that moment, I just had a cold rush from the neck up, and that’s the last memory I have,” said Ridley.

Zilisch jumped into action, performing CPR until paramedics arrived.

“I haven’t had CPR training in 20 years, and I just went into automatic mode,” said Zilisch.

Dispatchers talked him through it, as Ridley fought for his life.

“I knew it wasn’t his time, and I was like, ‘God, put this life back into this

man,'” said Zilisch.

Ridley was rushed to the hospital, where he woke up after 24 hours.

“Certain things had to happen, for everyone to be around, for me to be living, without a doubt,” said Ridley.

Jeff Zilisch

 

 

 

 

 

Jeff Zilisch

The life-saving actions were recognized by the Mequon Common Council Tuesday evening, Sept. 10 — these neighbors forever connected.

“He saved my life, and I’m blessed with that, but he’s the absolute hero in this scenario,” said Ridley.

Both men stressed the importance of CPR training, saying you’ll never know when you might need to use it.

 

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Source: https://fox6now.com/2019/09/10/it-wasnt-his-time-mequon-man-performed-cpr-saving-life-of-neighbor-who-went-into-cardiac-arrest/


Chick-fil-A Employee Saves Man’s Life with CPR in Parking Lot: ‘It Was Like Instinct Took Over’

A Chick-fil-A in California is serving up more than just poultry — it’s offering life-saving customer service, too.

An employee at the chain’s Chula Vista location is being celebrated as a hero after his quick-thinking CPR helped save a man in cardiac arrest.

Tauya Nenguke, 22, was working the Chick-fil-A drive-thru on Sept. 11 when he noticed a man lying unconscious beside his car around 8:30 p.m., according to local ABC affiliate KGTV.

As the restaurant explained in a Facebook post, Nenguke quickly handed his iPad for orders to a co-worker and “sprinted across the parking lot to find a man down with his scared friends frantically not knowing what to do.”

Nenguke, who recently took nursing classes, began doing chest compressions on the 20-year-old victim, local Fox affiliate KSWB reports.

“He wasn’t breathing or anything, his eyes were rolled back into his head,” he told KGTV. “I know this guy was out, [but] I didn’t know how long. I just started chest compression immediately.”

Nenguke even taught the man’s friend how to do CPR, and the two alternated until emergency crews arrived.

His fast action was later credited with helping save the young man’s life.

“There wasn’t any hesitation on my part. I knew that was the place where God placed me at the time,” he said.

Nenguke reportedly hopes to go to nursing school, and said the incident was a clear sign that he’s on the right path.

“This was truly a real big eye-opener to my calling to be in health care because at the moment, it was like instinct took over,” he said.

He’s worked at the restaurant as a team leader since March 2018, according to KSWB.

 

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Source: https://people.com/human-interest/chick-fil-a-employee-saves-mans-life-cpr-parking-lot/


First Aid Requirements for Businesses

OSHA requires businesses to provide  CPR training and First Aid to employees in the absence of a nearby clinic or hospital (OSHA Standard 1910.151).

While safety always begins with prevention, not every work-related injury can be prevented. Your primary first aid training goal should be to give employees the necessary tools and information they need to care for an ill or injured person, if necessary, until advanced help arrives.

OSHA does not teach or certify programs. Therefore, employers are faced with numerous programs to choose from, and the choice can be difficult. Because of this, a consensus group comprised of a panel of government and private experts developed the National Guidelines for First Aid in Occupational Settings in 1997.

This detailed curriculum identifies the skill training that makes a workplace first aid responder competent to provide care. Responding to OSHA’s requirement that every employer provide first aid assistance in the workplace, these guidelines document the minimum knowledge and skills necessary for an individual to provide basic life support care to an ill or injured person until professional emergency response arrives.

 

While starting a first aid program can be simple and inexpensive, it involves several essential steps:

1. Recognize that it is your responsibility as an employer to determine the requirements for your first aid program. As you assess your workplace, be mindful of the job site or work process that could cause illness or injury to employees. What types of accidents could reasonably occur in your workplace? Consider such things as falls, hazardous machinery and exposure to harmful substances. Be sure to put your evaluation in writing for reference purposes. Remember that, while OSHA does not recommend nor approve programs, it may evaluate your program’s adequacy during an inspection.

2. Assess the location and availability of a medical facility to your workplace. If a hospital, clinic or other such emergency response is not readily available, for instance, within three to four minutes, you must have at least one employee trained in first aid and CPR per shift. There is no recommended number of trained employees to have on staff; it largely depends on your facility’s size and type of operations. Responding in a timely manner can mean the difference between life and death, so it is crucial that you have an appropriate number of employees trained.

For organizations in multiple sites a larger number of employees must be trained. Many experts believe all employees should know how to provide first aid and CPR to ensure that help is always at hand. At a minimum, each department or location should have a responder available on each shift.

3. Make sure you have suitable first aid supplies readily available at all times.Click here to see current ANSI Standards

Effective Aug. 17, 1998, OSHA added an Appendix A to its very basic First Aid and Medical standard found in 29 CFR 1910.151. It requires the employer to reference ANSI Z308.1-1978, Minimum Requirements for Industrial Unit-Type First Aid Kits.

According to OSHA, the contents of the kit listed in the ANSI standard should be adequate for small worksites. However, larger or multiple operations should consider the need for additional first aid kits and additional types of first aid equipment and supplies in larger quantities. OSHA suggests consulting a local fire and rescue department appropriate medical professional or first aid supplier for assistance in these circumstances.

4. OSHA recommends you periodically assess your kit and increase your supplies as needed. Place your first aid supplies in an easily accessible area, and inform all your employees of its location. Along with a well-stocked, workplace-specific first aid kit, other basic supplies normally include emergency oxygen, blankets, stretchers, directional signs, eyewash stations and burn stations.

In addition to these items, if blood-related incidents are anticipated, you must provide appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) as mandated in OSHA’s Blood-borne Pathogens standard (29 CFR 1910.1030). It lists specific PPE for this type of exposure, such as gloves, gowns, face shields, masks, and eye protection.

5. On-site safety inspections, review of hazards and emergency dispatch, assessment, implementation, escape and treatment should be discussed in your training program. Employees must be trained to act and think quickly to avoid delayed treatment during an emergency. Ask yourself, whether each employee knows how to report an injury or illness.

Outline the accident investigating and reporting procedures and relay that to your employees as part of your company’s policy. Early recognition and treatment of an injury or illness is essential.

Employees must be aware of emergency contact information. It is best to post emergency procedures and emergency office contact numbers with your first aid supplies or in another highly visible and accessible area. Make sure that your field personnel also have suitable supplies and office contact numbers readily available. Appoint an employee in each department to watch for hazards and evaluate its current first aid status. Set a deadline to report any hazards or first aid needs to a manager or supervisor for improvement or correction.

Since people tend to forget their first aid training over time, OSHA recommends refresher training be conducted to recharge employees’ knowledge of first aid procedures. At a minimum, employees should be certified annually to perform CPR and once every three years to perform first aid. If such training sounds burdensome, consider that it can produce safer work practices and fewer incidents among employees.

Keeping the workplace safe involves three basic elements:

  1. Steps to prevent or minimize accidents
  2. Adequate first aid supplies
  3. Proper first aid training.

The employer uses training to make sure its employees know what to do, how to do it and who is in charge in case a first aid or emergency situation occurs. Proper first aid training not only satisfies OSHA requirements, but fosters goodwill among employees, who recognize the care that their company expends to provide a safe and healthy environment for its most valuable asset: its employees.

 

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Y employees use AED to save life

Critical seconds tick away. Training takes over. Josh Eckstein, a lifeguard at the Southeastern Indiana YMCA, knew what to do while on duty one morning in late July when he saw a Y member start to go under the water, says marketing coordinator Kathleen Bohman.

He immediately put the YMCA emergency protocols into action, pulling the member out of the water to perform CPR while Connie Fledderman, Welcome Center staff member, called EMS and came to assist Eckstein with the automated external defibrillator.

More than 350,000 cardiac arrests happen outside of hospitals each year, and 90 percent of Americans who experience out-of-hospital cardiac arrests die. However, the American Heart Association estimates that properly administered CPR can triple a person’s odds of survival. Sadly, only 46 percent of cardiac arrest victims get CPR from a bystander.

“I had no idea what was in store for me as I swam my regular laps that day,” recalls the Y member. “My heart stopped beating. Had this happened to me anywhere other than the Y, I may not be here to be able to talk about my good outcome.”

Y executive director Angie Harmeyer says, “In addition to our lifeguards being certified by the American Red Cross, we require all YMCA staff to be first aid/CPR/AED trained within the first 30 days of employment, followed by regular recertifications and in-service trainings. Providing a safe environment for our members and guests is everyone’s job. That also means being prepared.”

Why is CPR/AED training important?

  1) By performing simple procedures and following certain guidelines, it may be possible to save lives by giving basic treatment until professional medical help arrives.

 2) In an emergency, there’s no time to read instructions.

3) If you’ve memorized some of the basic procedures, it will help you react quickly and efficiently.

4) It can make the difference from complete recovery and permanent disability.

5) It can help save a life.

“Josh and Connie showed exactly why we put such an emphasis on CPR training for all city employees, companies and the general public who are eager to be certified,” said Batesville Fire Chief Todd Schutte. “Through their immediate response and actions, the patient survived the incident and is on the road to a full recovery.”

 

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Source: https://www.batesvilleheraldtribune.com/news/local_news/y-employees-use-aed-to-save-life/article_0d8867d8-c376-11e9-a09b-37d70bfea96b.html


Man makes ‘miracle’ recovery from heart attack after strangers perform CPR

On July 23, building contractor Brian Boos, JDW, Inc. service repair supervisor Darren Ebaugh and FerrelGas technician Shawn Kainz were all called to a home in rural Oak Creek to fix a family’s furnace. The three men say they have crossed paths on job sites before but were essentially strangers. They didn’t even know each other’s names.

“Everything was meant to be. It was one of those days. One of those moments that everything was meant to be,” Boos told FOX31.

Upon arriving to the job site, Kainz began complaining of chest pains. He told Boos and Ebaugh that he planned to see a doctor after finishing the work on the furnace regulator.

“I felt like I had heartburn. That’s all I remember,” Kainz said.

Ebaugh was putting his tools in his truck while Boos and Kainz stood together outside the home. That’s when Kainz collapsed.

“He didn’t grab his chest. He didn’t say, ‘Oh no.’ He just turned and [fell],” Boos said.

Boos attempted to call 911 and despite having an extremely weak signal in the rural area, he was able to connect with emergency dispatch. They helped talk Ebaugh and Boos through nearly 15 minutes of CPR until paramedics arrived.

“Just looking at his eyes, his eyes were glazed over. From being a hunter, I’ve seen it a lot and I knew what it meant. He was gone,” Ebaugh said.

“For sure there was no life,” Boos said.

The two never stopped CPR.

“The bystander CPR saved him. They kept him alive until we could get here,” Oak Creek Fire EMS supervisor Angela Bracegirdle told FOX31.

She has been with the department for 19 years. In that time, she says often bystanders will give up on CPR after about two minutes, if they even step in to help at all.

“Just keep going. Don’t stop. Because you never know,” Bracegirdle said.

Bracegirdle and her team were able to get Kainz’s heart restarted and he began breathing on his own before he was loaded into an ambulance. On the way to the hospital, she says he went into cardiac arrest again and regained a pulse after they used an AED (automatic electronic defibrillator) on him.

“It was a widow maker,” Kainz told FOX31. “It was 100-percent clogged coronary artery on the top right.”

He spent less than a week in the hospital before being released. He is now recovering and those around him say his progress is a miracle.

“Monday, [I got] the call, ‘He wants to have dinner with you.’ It just blew me away. I never would have imaged he survived,” Ebaugh said.

“It doesn’t look like he has a dent on his bumper. He looks like a million bucks. It’s a miracle,” Boos said.

“Yes, it is. It is. In my 19 years, I’ve only seen two walk out of the hospital,” Bracegirdle said.

Oak Creek Fire Chief Chuck Wisecup says in his 36-year career, this is the first time he has seen someone survive CPR.

“I think everyone needs to learn CPR,” Kainz said. “I think it’ll be a big awareness for everybody to learn CPR.”

Boos had taken a CPR class seven years prior. Ebaugh hadn’t taken one since he was in high school 25 years ago. They both say they now plan to be re-certified on a yearly basis.

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Can You Find The Defibrillator At Work?

About 10,000 cardiac arrests happen in workplaces each year, according to the American Heart Association. Using an automatic external defibrillator can increase the chance of survival.

Do you know where your workplace’s automated external defibrillator is located? About half of all U.S. employees don’t, according to the results of an American Heart Association survey.

The survey also found that workers in the hospitality and service industry, which includes hotels and restaurants, were less likely to know the location of their workplace’s AED. About 66 percent of them didn’t know where it was. Workers in schools and other education facilities were the most likely to be able to find it: About 61 percent said they knew the AED’s location.

However, the survey didn’t follow up and ask whether the workplace had an AED, and also didn’t try to distinguish between who didn’t know where the AED was and those who didn’t know if there was an AED on site. That makes the findings less clear.

For every minute that you’re in cardiac arrest, you’re pulseless, your [chance of ] survival drops by 10 percent

An AED checks the heart’s rhythm and can send an electric shock to the heart to try to restore a normal rhythm.

More than 350,000 cardiac arrests take place in the U.S. in locations other than hospitals each year, according to the American Heart Association. In 2015, Nancy Holland, a resident of Leawood, Kan., became one of them.

She went into cardiac arrest in the restroom of a restaurant where she had been eating dinner with her husband. The restaurant’s manager performed CPR until paramedics arrived with an AED.

Holland says she’s lucky the restaurant’s manager knew CPR, because it kept her “salvageable” until the paramedics showed up. When he started working as a restaurant manager, she says, his mom had told him he owed it to the customers to learn CPR — just in case.

Now whenever she walks into a building, she scans the walls looking for an AED.

“I hope I never need it, but it’s always in the back of my mind,” Holland says.

She also gives talks about the importance of CPR and AED training, emphasizing that cardiac arrest can happen to anyone.

Holland was in her 40s and didn’t have any health problems when she went into cardiac arrest. She had been to her doctor for a checkup just three weeks earlier.

And she’s now a board member of her local chapter of the HeartSafe Foundation, which provides free training in hands-only CPR and works to improve public access to AEDs.

She also says businesses should take precautions before an emergency happens.

About 10,000 cardiac arrests happen in workplaces each year, the AHA says.

More than half of employees — about 55 percent — aren’t offered first aid or CPR/AED training through their employer, the American Heart Association survey found. And sometimes employees have access to only one form of training.

But most of the 2,000 employees surveyed say their employers should offer first aid and CPR/AED training. Ninety percent say they would participate in training if their employers provided them.

Cost and fear of liability are two reasons that businesses don’t install AEDs.

A typical AED costs about $1,200 to $1,500 and prices have gone down over time as the technology becomes more widespread. Machines that once cost $3,000 now run under $1,000, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures, which tracks the passage of laws related to AEDs.

When it comes to legal liability if an AED is used improperly and someone is injured or killed, in most states you’re protected by law.

In addition, AEDs have a built-in mechanism for analyzing heart rhythms and evaluating whether a shock is needed.

But AEDs do need to be maintained in order to be effective. Batteries should be replaced every two to five years, depending on the model. And the sticky pads that adhere to a cardiac arrest victim’s skin also come with expiration dates and need to be replaced about every two to three years.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration doesn’t require workplaces to have AEDs, but it does encourage employers to have them on-site.

Click here to learn more about choosing the right AED for your business

 

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Sources: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/06/19/533269211/can-you-find-the-defibrillator-at-work-half-of-people-say-no

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“Second chance at life:” Daughter uses CPR to save life of father in cardiac arrest

A 26-year-old lifeguard trained in CPR saved her father’s life

A 59-year-old Town of Farmington man was hosting a family gathering at his Green Lake home on Friday when he became unresponsive.

The man had no prior cardiac history.

His stepdaughter recognized the signs of cardiac distress and started CPR.

“The early intervention of CPR by the stepdaughter provided the critical time needed to get first responders on scene with the AED. Thanks to her, this man has a second chance at life.” Washington County Sheriff Martin Schulteis said. “Stories like this clearly demonstrate the importance for everyone to know basic CPR. One day you may need it to save a loved one, just as this stepdaughter did.”

The man regained consciousness before he was transported to the hospital.

The family said the man has recovered and is set to be released today.

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Source:https://www.cbs58.com/news/second-chance-at-life-daughter-uses-cpr-to-save-life-of-father-in-cardiac-arrest


‘Couldn’t let him go:’ Washington County woman saved stepfather’s life with CPR

A Washington County woman jumped into action to save her stepfather’s life. The 26-year-old performed CPR until first responders arrived to help.

 

“I mean, it was crazy,” said Rachel Nelson. “You sort of have to block the chaos out and focus on the job at hand.”

Nelson and her stepfather, Curt Vorpahl, were hanging out with family on Friday, July 19.

“We thought it was going to be a great day to be out on the lake,” said Vorpahl.

Rachel Nelson, Curt Vorpahl

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The family was gathered when Vorpahl suddenly went into cardiac arrest.

“The last thing I remember was thinking how warm it was for it starting to become the evening,” said Vorpahl. Vorpahl’s pulse faded away, and Nelson quickly reacted.

“I started immediately with compressions, followed by rescue breaths. I continued that for five minutes or so,” said Nelson. It involved five minutes of intense focus.

“I was thinking of my family the whole time, how I couldn’t let him go. I didn’t want to let my family down,” said Nelson.

A first responder was nearby, providing a pocket mask and AED.

“He was shocked by the AED,” said Nelson. Vorpahl made it to the hospital.

“I still don’t believe it,” Vorpahl said. “It’s like it never happened.”

Hearing how many people fought for his life brought Vorpahl immense gratitude and emotion. “Every second count’s in a situation like this,” said Nelson.

Nelson learned CPR as a teenage lifeguard. Over the years, she renewed her certification and urged everyone to get theirs. The family was working with neighbors to hopefully put together a CPR course so more people can learn the life-saving skill.

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Source: https://fox6now.com/2019/07/24/couldnt-let-him-go-washington-county-woman-saved-stepfathers-life-with-cpr/


Less Than 20% Of Americans Are CPR Certified – Is Your Team Ready To Save A Life?

CPR/First Aid Training – Corporate and Group Classes

Green Guard offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, Green Guard’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Looking for a Team Building opportunity? Learn to save a life while providing a great team building exercise.

Schedule Your Class Now

Call Now to speak with a Green Guard CPR/First Aid Training Specialist

Click Here to learn more about CPR/First Aid training

 

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