Chat with us, powered by LiveChat

Are your eyewash stations OSHA/ANSI compliant?

Fendall Pureflow 1000
Fendall Pureflow 1000

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention states that each day about 2,000 U.S. worker have a job-related eye injury that requires medical treatment. Chemical burns to one or both eyes are common.

Many of these injuries can result in blindness. Proper safety equipment, such as eye protection and eyewash stations can save a worker’s eyesight.

OSHA on Compliance

The General Requirements in section 29 CFR (Code of Federal Regulations) 1910.151 states “…where the eyes or body of any person may be exposed to injurious corrosive materials, suitable facilities for quick drenching or flushing of the eyes and body shall be provided within the work area for immediate emergency use.”

American National Standards Institute

(ANSI) Standard Z358.1-2014 sets universal minimum performance and use requirements for all eyewash stations and drench shower equipment.

ANSI standard Z358.1-2014 says an eyewash station must:

  • Be accessible within a 10-second walk from the hazard
  • Be accessible without the need to walk up or down stairs, ladders, or cross any obstacles or roadways etc.
  • Deliver a 15-minute continuous flow of tepid fluid at 0.4 gallons per minute and be 60-100°F
  • Be located in areas where caustic or hazardous substances are present
  • Activate in one second or less and with one single motion
  • Be unobstructed
  • Be highly visible and identified with a sign

Where to place your emergency eyewash station

According to ANSI standards, the following areas must meet emergency eyewash compliance guidelines:

  • Painting and solvent operations
  • Battery charging stations
  • Tool parts washers
  • Laboratories
  • Hazardous chemical storage
  • Chemical pumping and/or mixing areas
  • Anywhere you use a chemical that has SDS eyewash requirements

If you need more information contact Green Guard today for a free consultation.


Understanding eyewash stations and their requirements

Fendall Pureflow 1000
Fendall Pureflow 1000

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention states that each day about 2,000 U.S. worker have a job-related eye injury that requires medical treatment. Chemical burns to one or both eyes are common.

Many of these injuries can result in blindness. Proper safety equipment, such as eye protection and eyewash stations can save a worker’s eyesight.

OSHA on Compliance

The General Requirements in section 29 CFR (Code of Federal Regulations) 1910.151 states “…where the eyes or body of any person may be exposed to injurious corrosive materials, suitable facilities for quick drenching or flushing of the eyes and body shall be provided within the work area for immediate emergency use.”

American National Standards Institute

(ANSI) Standard Z358.1-2014 sets universal minimum performance and use requirements for all eyewash stations and drench shower equipment.

ANSI standard Z358.1-2014 says an eyewash station must:

  • Be accessible within a 10-second walk from the hazard
  • Be accessible without the need to walk up or down stairs, ladders, or cross any obstacles or roadways etc.
  • Deliver a 15-minute continuous flow of tepid fluid at 0.4 gallons per minute and be 60-100°F
  • Be located in areas where caustic or hazardous substances are present
  • Activate in one second or less and with one single motion
  • Be unobstructed
  • Be highly visible and identified with a sign

Where to place your emergency eyewash station

According to ANSI standards, the following areas must meet emergency eyewash compliance guidelines:

  • Painting and solvent operations
  • Battery charging stations
  • Tool parts washers
  • Laboratories
  • Hazardous chemical storage
  • Chemical pumping and/or mixing areas
  • Anywhere you use a chemical that has SDS eyewash requirements

If you need more information contact Green Guard today for a free consultation.


Understanding the different types of hard hats

Har hats are designed to protect one of the most important parts of the human body. But did you know that there are different types and classes of hard hats. Make sure that you are using the right class of hard hat for the job.

The American National Standards Institute ANSI has put together a list to help ensure you have the right protection for the job.

ANSI Types of Hard Hats

According to ANSI Z89.1 all hard hats can be divided into two types. Type I and Type II.

  • Type I: Have a full brim around the entire hat. These are only mean to to protect workers from object blows that come from above and strike the top of the helmet.
  • Type II Have a short brim only in front. These hard hats are designed to offer protection from lateral blows and objects. This includes front and back, and side as well as top. These hard hats are also test for off-center penetration resistance and chin strap retention. Type II are the most commonly found hard hat in use.

ANSI Classes of Hard Hats

Hard Hats are also divided into classes to indicate how well they protect against shock.

  • Class E (Electrical) Can withstand up to 20,000 volts of electricity
  • Class G (General) Can withstand up to 2,200 colts of electricity
  • Class C (Conductive) These offer no protection from electric shock

Materials & Suspension

Most hard hats are made of non-conductive, high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and come equipped with a suspension that can be adjusted for a custom fit. Suspensions are available with 4, 6, or 8 load-bearing points and can be fitted using several different types of adjustments. The most common are pinlock, where the hard hat is removed and a pin is matched to a corresponding hole, and ratchet, which uses a knob to tighten or loosen the suspension’s fit around the head while wearing the hard hat.

Styles

When considering tasks and situations, hard hats are available in different styles. Cap hard hats have a short front brim that helps to shade the face from the sun and keeps rain away from the eyes. Some cap hard hats can also be worn backwards so the front brim is over the back of the neck. Full brim styles feature a brim that goes around the entire cap and shades the face, back of the neck, and ears. The full brim can also help to channel rain and snow away from the face and head.