Chat with us, powered by LiveChat

Can You Find The Defibrillator At Work?

About 10,000 cardiac arrests happen in workplaces each year, according to the American Heart Association. Using an automatic external defibrillator can increase the chance of survival.

Do you know where your workplace’s automated external defibrillator is located? About half of all U.S. employees don’t, according to the results of an American Heart Association survey.

The survey also found that workers in the hospitality and service industry, which includes hotels and restaurants, were less likely to know the location of their workplace’s AED. About 66 percent of them didn’t know where it was. Workers in schools and other education facilities were the most likely to be able to find it: About 61 percent said they knew the AED’s location.

However, the survey didn’t follow up and ask whether the workplace had an AED, and also didn’t try to distinguish between who didn’t know where the AED was and those who didn’t know if there was an AED on site. That makes the findings less clear.

For every minute that you’re in cardiac arrest, you’re pulseless, your [chance of ] survival drops by 10 percent

An AED checks the heart’s rhythm and can send an electric shock to the heart to try to restore a normal rhythm.

More than 350,000 cardiac arrests take place in the U.S. in locations other than hospitals each year, according to the American Heart Association. In 2015, Nancy Holland, a resident of Leawood, Kan., became one of them.

She went into cardiac arrest in the restroom of a restaurant where she had been eating dinner with her husband. The restaurant’s manager performed CPR until paramedics arrived with an AED.

Holland says she’s lucky the restaurant’s manager knew CPR, because it kept her “salvageable” until the paramedics showed up. When he started working as a restaurant manager, she says, his mom had told him he owed it to the customers to learn CPR — just in case.

Now whenever she walks into a building, she scans the walls looking for an AED.

“I hope I never need it, but it’s always in the back of my mind,” Holland says.

She also gives talks about the importance of CPR and AED training, emphasizing that cardiac arrest can happen to anyone.

Holland was in her 40s and didn’t have any health problems when she went into cardiac arrest. She had been to her doctor for a checkup just three weeks earlier.

And she’s now a board member of her local chapter of the HeartSafe Foundation, which provides free training in hands-only CPR and works to improve public access to AEDs.

She also says businesses should take precautions before an emergency happens.

About 10,000 cardiac arrests happen in workplaces each year, the AHA says.

More than half of employees — about 55 percent — aren’t offered first aid or CPR/AED training through their employer, the American Heart Association survey found. And sometimes employees have access to only one form of training.

But most of the 2,000 employees surveyed say their employers should offer first aid and CPR/AED training. Ninety percent say they would participate in training if their employers provided them.

Cost and fear of liability are two reasons that businesses don’t install AEDs.

A typical AED costs about $1,200 to $1,500 and prices have gone down over time as the technology becomes more widespread. Machines that once cost $3,000 now run under $1,000, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures, which tracks the passage of laws related to AEDs.

When it comes to legal liability if an AED is used improperly and someone is injured or killed, in most states you’re protected by law.

In addition, AEDs have a built-in mechanism for analyzing heart rhythms and evaluating whether a shock is needed.

But AEDs do need to be maintained in order to be effective. Batteries should be replaced every two to five years, depending on the model. And the sticky pads that adhere to a cardiac arrest victim’s skin also come with expiration dates and need to be replaced about every two to three years.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration doesn’t require workplaces to have AEDs, but it does encourage employers to have them on-site.

Click here to learn more about choosing the right AED for your business

 

Call Now to speak with a Green Guard CPR/First Aid/AED Specialist

Click Here to learn more about AED/CPR/First Aid training

Click Here for webChat

 

If you liked this post be sure to follow us:

linkedinfacebook  

 

Sources: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/06/19/533269211/can-you-find-the-defibrillator-at-work-half-of-people-say-no

 


5 Common Misconceptions About Defibrillator’s (AED’s)

An automatic external defibrillator (AED) can save lives.

AEDs provide access to life-saving care at your business, event, or public gathering and can be used by team members without the need for a medical degree. Unfortunately, many misconceptions about AED management that often prevent people from installing or learning how to use one. It’s time to address these issues to make you and your employees or residents more comfortable with AED use.

 

Myth #1 – AEDs Are Hard To Use

Modern technology is pretty amazing, and that’s true when it comes to modern defibrillation devices. Instead of wading through a large instruction book to learn how to operate an AED in times of emergency, the staff is trained upon device installation in AED management. Even an untrained person could manage to use an AED, the technology is that user-friendly. Upon powering on an AED, the device itself provides walk-through instructions from start to finish. It’s virtually foolproof.

 

Myth #2 – I Will Be Held Liable If Something Happens

While it is a litigation-happy world, it is a myth that providing AED resuscitation assistance to a person will put you at risk for a lawsuit. Good Samaritan laws were put in place to offer just this kind of protection, prompting bystanders to take action that can greatly reduce further injury and even death.  Since only 8% of patients survive out-of-hospital cardiac incidents, defibrillation is encouragedAll jurisdictions in the United States provide some level of immunity to AED users, 60% require public access defibrillation maintenance, 59% require emergency medical service notification, 55% impose training requirements, and 41% require medical oversight. Understand more with  PlusTrac’s resource on AED Laws now.

 

Myth #3 – You’re Going To Shock Someone That Doesn’t Need It

In the year 2019 — this just can’t happen. Modern safety checks are built into each AED so that you can’t shock someone you’re not supposed to. Every AED analyzes the patient and looks for two specific rhythms indicating cardiac distress, the AED will only shock if the rhythm is found. Accidental shocking is now only part of Hollywood entertainment.

 

Myth #4 – Emergency Services Will Be Slower If We Have an AED

This myth is simply false. Emergency responders do not delay service based on AED presence. In fact, a registered AED can provide 9-11 responders additional resources to support you over the phone while you’re waiting for help to arrive. Operators can help you locate registered devices by guiding you through your building, and even help dispatch a volunteer responder if there is one nearby. This emergency treatment may help you buy the minutes needed to stabilize an injury while waiting for that ambulance to arrive.

 

Myth #5 – AEDs Are Expensive Equipment For a Very Rare Occurrence

Sudden cardiac arrest is a lot more common than most people think. Over 320,000 people experience these events outside a hospital each year, with very low survival rates. In a situation where every second counts, AEDs can buy life-saving time. And this life-saving technology is affordable. Over a ten-year period, the average AED will cost about only about $130-$300 per year to own, as technology advances costs continue to improve for the value of what you purchase.

Don’t let the myths and misconceptions about AEDs prevent you from offering this safety net to your employees.

 

Call Now to speak with a Green Guard AED Specialist

Click Here to learn more about AED’s

Click Here for webChat

 

If you liked this post be sure to follow us:

linkedinfacebook  

 

Source: https://www.plustrac.com/plustrac-blog/5-common-misconceptions-about-aed-use?utm_content=95272284&utm_medium=social&utm_source=linkedin&hss_channel=lcp-913526


It’s Sudden Cardiac Awareness Month – Learn CPR

CPR/First Aid Training – Corporate and Group Classes

Over 300,000 Americans die every year from Sudden Cardiac Arrest, be sure your company has first responders trained and ready to help save a life.

We make it easy! Green Guard offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, Green Guard’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

Looking for a Team Building opportunity? Learn to save a life while providing a great team-building exercise.

Schedule Your Class Now

Call Now to speak with a Green Guard CPR/First Aid Training Specialist

Click Here to learn more about CPR/First Aid training

 

Follow us:

linkedin facebook  


Sudden Cardiac Arrest Awareness Month – What You Should Know

More than 350,000 deaths occur each year as a result of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA)

SCA claims one life every two minutes, taking more lives each year than breast cancer, lung cancer, or AIDS. To decrease the death toll from SCA, it is important to understand what SCA is, what warning signs are, and how to respond and prevent SCA from occurring. More than 65 percent of Americans not only underestimate the seriousness of SCA, but also believe SCA is a type of heart attack. But they are not the same thing.

Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Awareness

October is Sudden Cardiac Arrest Awareness Month, which represents a critical initiative by the Heart Rhythm Society to raise awareness for Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) and help the public become more familiar with what it is, how it affects people, and what can be done to help save lives.

The Society’s award-winning “Apples and Oranges” campaign uses a simple analogy to educate people about the difference between a heart attack and SCA. More than 65 percent of Americans not only underestimate the seriousness of SCA, but also believe SCA is a type of heart attack. The campaign targets heart attack survivors, who are at the highest risk for SCA, and stresses the importance of maintaining a healthy heart lifestyle and learning critical risk markers, especially their Ejection Fraction (EF).

This public service announcement explains the dangers of SCA and features Emmy-award winning journalist Shaun Robinson.

About Sudden Cardiac Arrest

  • More than 350,000 deaths occur each year as a result of sudden cardiac arrest.
  • SCA claims one life every two minutes, taking more lives each year than breast cancer, lung cancer, or AIDS.
  • To decrease the death toll from SCA, it is important to understand what SCA is, what warning signs are, and how to respond and prevent SCA from occurring.

Responding to SCA — Time is Everything

Time-to-treatment is critical when considering the chance of survival for an SCA victim. Ninety-five percent of those who experience SCA die because they do not receive life-saving defibrillation within four to six minutes, before brain and permanent death start to occur. Learn more about the steps to take when responding to a potential SCA emergency.

SCA Resources

Patients can access information about SCA, including causes, prevention, and other important facts.

SCArisk.org

Learn your SCA risk by using an interactive online tool. It’s fast and easy — simply answer a few questions regarding your health and get your results. After you have finished using the assessment, please consult with your physician regarding your results.

 

Call Now to speak with a Green Guard CPR/First Aid/AED Specialist

Click Here to learn more about AED/CPR/First Aid training

Click Here for webChat

 

Follow us:

linkedinfacebook  

Source: https://www.hrsonline.org/sudden-cardiac-arrest-sca-awareness


Post-Dispatch’s Goold helps save man’s life at Busch Stadium

Before he chronicled the Cardinals’ first division title-clinching since 2015, Post-Dispatch baseball writer Derrick Goold helped save a man’s life Sunday at Busch Stadium.

St. Louis-based videographer Mike Flanary, 64, collapsed in the Cubs’ dugout before the game and was briefly without a pulse before CPR was performed by Goold, a longtime former lifeguard and Eagle Scout trained in CPR. After receiving further medical attention from the Cubs’ training staff and then emergency medical personnel, Flanary was transferred to Barnes-Jewish Hospital.

Medical officials said Flanary, who was working for a Chicago television affiliate for Sunday’s game, was in “critical but stable” condition after suffering a heart attack and then a stroke.

Cardinals’ security director Phil Melcher, asked about Goold’s immediate assistance, said it was “huge. You cannot discount that, at all. I absolutely thanked him.”

Washington University’s Dr. David Tan, the stadium doctor on duty Sunday at Busch, said, “So many people are afraid of doing CPR. But, because of (Goold’s) actions, he was the first link in that chain of survival.

“It’s fabulous. It was the early CPR by Derrick Goold that probably saved his life. Derrick wasn’t afraid. He didn’t hesitate. And he did it.

“In the medical field, when you save somebody like this, they call it a clinical save. This is a clinical save that was started by Derrick Goold. Period.”

Bill Hayes, a registered nurse who was on duty as a supervisor, said, “Somebody said, ‘Does somebody know CPR? And Derrick said, ‘I do.’

Goold had just entered the dugout area just before the Cubs were to announce the dismissal of Joe Maddon as manager.

 

Schedule Your CPR Class Now

Call Now to speak with a Green Guard CPR/First Aid Training Specialist

Click Here to learn more about CPR/First Aid training

 

Follow us:

linkedin facebook  


Confused about AED Inspections? This Might Help….

So you have an AED, but do you need to inspect it?

OSHA Standards do not specifically address automated external defibrillators. However, their previously issued TIB-01-12-17 recommends the use of AEDs at every work site as a safe, effective, easily learned method to improve survival rates for sudden cardiac arrest victims.

Therefore, when seconds count, it is vital that an AED is functioning properly and the only way of achieving this is through, regular, routine inspections.

This is endorsed by the American Heart Association in their publication Implementing an AED Program, which recommends “It is important to do a weekly or monthly visual inspection of the AEDs to ensure they are in working order. The program coordinator or another designated person can do the inspections. This person develops a written checklist to assess the readiness of the AEDs.”

 

AED Inspection Checklist Solution

When it comes to AED inspections there are a couple of options:

               1. Inspect yourself

               2. Have a specialist manage your AED inspections for you

 

If you plan to inspect the AED yourself we have a great AED inspection Checklist solution that will help:

  • Meet OSHA 1915.87 App A
  • Make date and time-stamped safety status visible to everyone around the AED
  • Drive safe behavior in making sure AED inspections take place
  • Help the inspector by walking them through what to inspect using the checklist book
  • Ensure accountability and safety ownership with signature capture
  • Keep an instant and auditable record in the carbon copy checklist book
  • Engage supervisors and colleagues by making safety visible and building a safety culture
  • Make maintenance and repair proactive, fast and efficient

 

 Call Now to learn more about AED checklists.

 Call Now to learn about our AED Management Program and let us do all the work for you.

Follow us:

linkedin facebook  


Learn To Save a Life In 4 Hours – CPR Training, Are You Prepared?

CPR/First Aid Training – Corporate and Group Classes

Green Guard offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, Green Guard’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Looking for a Team Building opportunity? Learn to save a life while providing a great team-building exercise.

Schedule Your Class Now

Call Now to speak with a Green Guard CPR/First Aid Training Specialist

Click Here to learn more about CPR/First Aid training

 

If you liked this post be sure to follow us:

linkedin facebook  


It wasn’t his time:’ man performed CPR, saving life of neighbor in cardiac arrest

A man heard cries from his condo, and ran to help. He ended up saving his neighbor’s life!

After he heard screams coming from a nearby condo, Jeff Zilisch saw that his neighbor had collapsed. He used his CPR training to save him.

“It was being at the right place at the right time,” said Zilisch.

“My heart goes out to him,” said Tim Ridley, whose life was saved. “It’s just amazing.”

Tim Ridley

 

It happened in early August, as Zilisch cleaned his garage.

“Halfway across the parking lot, I realized, ‘Oh my gosh! This is not what I thought it was,'” said Zilisch.

Jeff Tilisch, Tim Ridley

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ridley was experiencing cardiac arrest. He was power washing his porch when he passed out.

“At that moment, I just had a cold rush from the neck up, and that’s the last memory I have,” said Ridley.

Zilisch jumped into action, performing CPR until paramedics arrived.

“I haven’t had CPR training in 20 years, and I just went into automatic mode,” said Zilisch.

Dispatchers talked him through it, as Ridley fought for his life.

“I knew it wasn’t his time, and I was like, ‘God, put this life back into this

man,'” said Zilisch.

Ridley was rushed to the hospital, where he woke up after 24 hours.

“Certain things had to happen, for everyone to be around, for me to be living, without a doubt,” said Ridley.

Jeff Zilisch

 

 

 

 

 

Jeff Zilisch

The life-saving actions were recognized by the Mequon Common Council Tuesday evening, Sept. 10 — these neighbors forever connected.

“He saved my life, and I’m blessed with that, but he’s the absolute hero in this scenario,” said Ridley.

Both men stressed the importance of CPR training, saying you’ll never know when you might need to use it.

 

Call Now to speak with a Green Guard CPR/First Aid/AED Specialist

Click Here to learn more about AED/CPR/First Aid training

Click Here for webChat

 

If you liked this post be sure to follow us:

linkedinfacebook  

Source: https://fox6now.com/2019/09/10/it-wasnt-his-time-mequon-man-performed-cpr-saving-life-of-neighbor-who-went-into-cardiac-arrest/


Y employees use AED to save life

Critical seconds tick away. Training takes over. Josh Eckstein, a lifeguard at the Southeastern Indiana YMCA, knew what to do while on duty one morning in late July when he saw a Y member start to go under the water, says marketing coordinator Kathleen Bohman.

He immediately put the YMCA emergency protocols into action, pulling the member out of the water to perform CPR while Connie Fledderman, Welcome Center staff member, called EMS and came to assist Eckstein with the automated external defibrillator.

More than 350,000 cardiac arrests happen outside of hospitals each year, and 90 percent of Americans who experience out-of-hospital cardiac arrests die. However, the American Heart Association estimates that properly administered CPR can triple a person’s odds of survival. Sadly, only 46 percent of cardiac arrest victims get CPR from a bystander.

“I had no idea what was in store for me as I swam my regular laps that day,” recalls the Y member. “My heart stopped beating. Had this happened to me anywhere other than the Y, I may not be here to be able to talk about my good outcome.”

Y executive director Angie Harmeyer says, “In addition to our lifeguards being certified by the American Red Cross, we require all YMCA staff to be first aid/CPR/AED trained within the first 30 days of employment, followed by regular recertifications and in-service trainings. Providing a safe environment for our members and guests is everyone’s job. That also means being prepared.”

Why is CPR/AED training important?

  1) By performing simple procedures and following certain guidelines, it may be possible to save lives by giving basic treatment until professional medical help arrives.

 2) In an emergency, there’s no time to read instructions.

3) If you’ve memorized some of the basic procedures, it will help you react quickly and efficiently.

4) It can make the difference from complete recovery and permanent disability.

5) It can help save a life.

“Josh and Connie showed exactly why we put such an emphasis on CPR training for all city employees, companies and the general public who are eager to be certified,” said Batesville Fire Chief Todd Schutte. “Through their immediate response and actions, the patient survived the incident and is on the road to a full recovery.”

 

Call Now to speak with a Green Guard CPR/First Aid/AED Specialist

Click Here to learn more about AED/CPR/First Aid training

Click Here for webChat

 

If you liked this post be sure to follow us:

linkedinfacebook  

 

Source: https://www.batesvilleheraldtribune.com/news/local_news/y-employees-use-aed-to-save-life/article_0d8867d8-c376-11e9-a09b-37d70bfea96b.html


Can You Find The Defibrillator At Work?

About 10,000 cardiac arrests happen in workplaces each year, according to the American Heart Association. Using an automatic external defibrillator can increase the chance of survival.

Do you know where your workplace’s automated external defibrillator is located? About half of all U.S. employees don’t, according to the results of an American Heart Association survey.

The survey also found that workers in the hospitality and service industry, which includes hotels and restaurants, were less likely to know the location of their workplace’s AED. About 66 percent of them didn’t know where it was. Workers in schools and other education facilities were the most likely to be able to find it: About 61 percent said they knew the AED’s location.

However, the survey didn’t follow up and ask whether the workplace had an AED, and also didn’t try to distinguish between who didn’t know where the AED was and those who didn’t know if there was an AED on site. That makes the findings less clear.

For every minute that you’re in cardiac arrest, you’re pulseless, your [chance of ] survival drops by 10 percent

An AED checks the heart’s rhythm and can send an electric shock to the heart to try to restore a normal rhythm.

More than 350,000 cardiac arrests take place in the U.S. in locations other than hospitals each year, according to the American Heart Association. In 2015, Nancy Holland, a resident of Leawood, Kan., became one of them.

She went into cardiac arrest in the restroom of a restaurant where she had been eating dinner with her husband. The restaurant’s manager performed CPR until paramedics arrived with an AED.

Holland says she’s lucky the restaurant’s manager knew CPR, because it kept her “salvageable” until the paramedics showed up. When he started working as a restaurant manager, she says, his mom had told him he owed it to the customers to learn CPR — just in case.

Now whenever she walks into a building, she scans the walls looking for an AED.

“I hope I never need it, but it’s always in the back of my mind,” Holland says.

She also gives talks about the importance of CPR and AED training, emphasizing that cardiac arrest can happen to anyone.

Holland was in her 40s and didn’t have any health problems when she went into cardiac arrest. She had been to her doctor for a checkup just three weeks earlier.

And she’s now a board member of her local chapter of the HeartSafe Foundation, which provides free training in hands-only CPR and works to improve public access to AEDs.

She also says businesses should take precautions before an emergency happens.

About 10,000 cardiac arrests happen in workplaces each year, the AHA says.

More than half of employees — about 55 percent — aren’t offered first aid or CPR/AED training through their employer, the American Heart Association survey found. And sometimes employees have access to only one form of training.

But most of the 2,000 employees surveyed say their employers should offer first aid and CPR/AED training. Ninety percent say they would participate in training if their employers provided them.

Cost and fear of liability are two reasons that businesses don’t install AEDs.

A typical AED costs about $1,200 to $1,500 and prices have gone down over time as the technology becomes more widespread. Machines that once cost $3,000 now run under $1,000, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures, which tracks the passage of laws related to AEDs.

When it comes to legal liability if an AED is used improperly and someone is injured or killed, in most states you’re protected by law.

In addition, AEDs have a built-in mechanism for analyzing heart rhythms and evaluating whether a shock is needed.

But AEDs do need to be maintained in order to be effective. Batteries should be replaced every two to five years, depending on the model. And the sticky pads that adhere to a cardiac arrest victim’s skin also come with expiration dates and need to be replaced about every two to three years.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration doesn’t require workplaces to have AEDs, but it does encourage employers to have them on-site.

Click here to learn more about choosing the right AED for your business

 

Call Now to speak with a Green Guard CPR/First Aid/AED Specialist

Click Here to learn more about AED/CPR/First Aid training

Click Here for webChat

 

If you liked this post be sure to follow us:

linkedinfacebook  

 

Sources: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/06/19/533269211/can-you-find-the-defibrillator-at-work-half-of-people-say-no

Green Guard First Aid