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Introduction to GHS for Construction Workers

Introduction to GHS for Construction Workers reviews what the Globally Harmonized System is all about, why OSHA adopted the GHS, and the phase-in dates for implementing the GHS. Created specifically to assist facilities in complying with the employee training requirements of OSHA’s newly adopted GHS regulations, this course discusses the Globally Harmonized System for the Classification and Labeling of Chemicals.

Topics covered in the program: Include what the Globally Harmonized System is, why OSHA adopted the GHS, hazard classification, the Safety Data Sheet, container labeling (text elements), container labeling (pictograms), information and training, GHS phase in dates and more.


Heat Stress in Construction Environments

“Heat Stress in Construction Environments reviews how heat affects the body, the steps employees can take to prevent heat stress, and elementary first aid that can be given to a worker who has been affected by a heat-related illness. Each year thousands of employees suffer the adverse effects of heat stress. Whether they work outdoors under the hot summer sun, or indoors with equipment and machinery that give off high levels of heat, these employees need to know how to recognize and prevent heat stress and other heat-related health problems.

Topics covered in this program: Include situations leading to heat-related illnesses, heat stress, heat exhaustion and heat stroke, how the body reacts to heat, recognizing symptoms of heat stress, preventing heat-related illnesses, first aid, and more. “


Hazard Communication in Construction Environments

Hazard Communication in Construction Environments both introduces employees to the Hazard Communication regulations and provides training on the various groups of chemicals found in the construction environment. Created specifically to assist construction workers of all types in complying with federal, state and municipal Hazard Communication regulations, the course addresses the major education and training requirements in these chemical hazard laws.

Topics covered in this program: Include background of the regulation, GHS Safety Data Sheets and container labels, toxins, corrosives and irritants; flammables, combustibles and gases; carcinogens and radiation, exposure situations, personal protective equipment and chemical storage, spills and clean-up and more. Using a powerful combination of audio, full-motion video, text and colorful graphics, this course provides the most cost-effective safety and regulatory compliance training available today.


Hand, Wrist & Finger Safety in Construction Environments

Every year over 500,000 workers injure their Hand, Wrist and Fingers Hand, Wrist & Finger Safety in Construction Environments reminds employees how easy it is to injure their fingers, hands and wrists, and reviews what should be done to prevent these types of injuries from occurring. Our hands, wrists and fingers are constantly exposed to possible injury. Recognizing potential problems, and taking steps to avoid them is important to all employees, no matter what their job.

Topics covered in this program: Include how the fingers, hand and wrist function, hazard identification, ergonomic considerations, the importance of staying alert, using the right tools, the role of machine guards, first-aid and emergency treatment, and more.


GHS Safety Data Sheets in Construction Environments

GHS Safety Data Sheets in Construction Environments reviews the composition of GHS Safety Data Sheets, the information that’s contained in each section and how SDS’s are different from Material Safety Data Sheets. Created specifically to assist facilities in complying with the employee training requirements of OSHA’s newly adopted GHS regulations, this course discusses how chemicals should be labeled under GHS.

Topics covered in the program: Include Material Safety Data Sheets and GHS SDS’s, materials and their hazards, hazardous materials emergencies, handling hazardous materials and more.


GHS Labeling in Construction Environments

GHS Container Labeling in Construction Environments discusses the six types of information contained on a GHS label, and the differences between GHS labels and other types of chemical hazard labels. Created specifically to assist facilities in complying with the employee training requirements of OSHA’s newly adopted GHS regulations, this course discusses how chemicals should be labeled under GHS.

Topics covered in the program: Include how the GHS changes chemical hazard labeling, GHS labels’ text elements, GHS labels’ pictograms, training and phase-in dates and more.


First Aid in Construction Environments

First Aid in Construction Environments shows employees that knowing basic first aid procedures can often limit the severity of any type of injury… or even prevent a death. In most facilities, not a day goes by without some type of injury occurring. It can be as serious as a chemical burn or as minor as a small cut. But any injury can be painful, and affect an employee’s work performance… as well as their activities off the job.

Topics covered in this program: Include cuts and bleeding, muscle pulls and sprains, burns, broken bones, shock, AEDs (automated external defibrillators), artificial respiration and CPR, and more.


Fall Protection in Construction Environments

“Over 10,000 people are killed every year as a result of falls…and 200,000 to 300,000 people are disabled Fall Protection in Construction Environments provides the information employees need to work safely when they are off the ground, and satisfies the major training requirements in the OSHA Standard on Fall Protection. Falls are the second leading cause of death each year in the United States (after traffic accidents)! Eight-five percent of all falls that occur on the job result in lost work time.

Topics covered in this program: Areas covered in the course include the seriousness of fall hazards, types of environments where falls may occur, the fall protection plan, concentrating and keeping a clear head, the importance of housekeeping in preventing falls, measures that can be taken to protect against falls, protective equipment, and more. “


Eye Safety in Construction Environments

Eye Safety in Construction Environments shows employees how many eye problems are caused by understanding how the type of work they are doing can strain their eyes… or by not wearing the appropriate protective equipment. The course reminds employees that eye injuries can easily happen to them and shows them how to prevent these injuries. Most employees take healthy eyes for granted. But our eyes are really very fragile, and statistics show that eye injuries occur frequently in the workplace.

Topics covered in this program: Include physiology of the eye, how it functions, common eye injuries and how they are caused, short and long term effects of eye injuries, eye care and safety practices, selecting and using appropriate personal protective equipment, and more.


Electrocution Hazards in Construction Part II

The second in a two-part series on electrocution hazards, Electrocution Hazards In Construction Environments Part II… Employer Requirements discusses the major types of electrocution hazards, and how employees can protect themselves from electrical hazards and electrocution in construction environments, as well as employers’ responsibilities in these areas. Construction sites can contain a number of potential electrical hazards. OSHA defines four types of hazards that are associated with electricity, and three types of injuries that result from them. Direct contact with electricity, through a power source, cord or transmission line is the most common type of electrical hazard, and can occur in a number of ways. Employers are required to train workers regarding electrocution hazards and the measures that they should take to control the hazards. Employers must also put procedures into place so that workers can get answers to any questions that they have about working safely around electrocution hazards.

Topics covered in this program: Electrical hazards and electrocution, power lines and isolation, tools and equipment, Assured Equipment Grounding Conductor Programs, lock-out/tag-out, employee training and more.