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5 Reasons Why Basic First Aid Knowledge Is Important

People often don’t consider the importance of basic first aid education. There are numerous reasons why people put it off.

  • They don’t have the time
  • They don’t know where to begin
  • They don’t believe that accidents will ever happen to them or those close to them
  • They think they already have enough knowledge should the need arise
  1. Helps to save lives.

A trained person is more reliable, confident and in control of themselves when an emergency arises. People who are trained are more likely to to take immediate action in an emergency situation.

  1. It allows the rescuer to provide the victim comfort.

Having someone trained in first aid can bring immediate relief to the patient. Being calm and assessing the situation helps the patient relax while their injuries are being treated and stabilized until emergency personnel arrive.

  1. It gives you tools to prevent the situation from becoming worse.

In some situations if a patient doesn’t receive basic first aid care immediately their situation will deteriorate – often rapidly. By being able to provide basic care you can stabilize a patient until emergency medical services arrives. You’ll learn how to use basic household items as tools if a first aid kit is not available meaning that you’ll be able to cope with many situations.

You’ll also be trained in how to collect information and data about what happened and the patients’ condition. This information will be passed on to the emergency services, which saves them time – you will be a valuable link in the chain of survival.

  1. It creates the confidence to care.

Having a basic first aid knowledge means that you’ll be confident in your skills and abilities in relation to first aid administration. By taking first aid training, it helps you to reflect on yourself and how you and others react in certain situations. Having this understanding will boost your confidence in a wide range of non-medical day to day situations.

  1. It encourages healthy and safe living.

A trained person is better able to asses their surroundings. Knowledge of first aid promotes the sense of safety and well being amongst people. Having an awareness and desire to be accident free keeps you more safe and reduces the number of causalities and accidents.

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Pet first aid – What you need to know

We love our pets! Below we list of a number of quick Pet First Aid tips. This list is meant as intermediary steps. You should also consult a veterinarian.

Pet First Aid

Do you know what to do during a pet emergency? Here are some common emergency tips:

  • If your cat or dog is dehydrated, pull up on the skin between the shoulder blades. It should spring right back; if it stays tented this is a sign of dehydration.
  • Signs of pet poisoning include bleeding externally or internally, dilated pupils, drooling or foaming at the mouth, seizures or other abnormal mental state or behavior. If suspect your pet has been poisoned, contact Animal Poison Control 888-426-4435
  • Signs of heat stroke or heat exhaustion include collapse; body temperature of 104 degrees F or above; bloody diarrhea or vomiting; wobbliness; excessive panting or difficulty breathing; increase heart rate; mucous membranes very red; and increased salivation.
  • Pets bitten by other animals need vet attention to prevent the wound (even if minor) from becoming infected and to check for internal wounds. You should never break up a dogfight yourself because you could be bitten.
  • If your pet is bleeding, apply direct pressure using gauze over the bleeding site. If blood soaks through, apply more gauze (do not removed soaked gauze) until you can reach a veterinary hospital.
  • If your pet has a seizure, make sure it is in a safe place, but do not restrain the animal. Keep your hands away from its mouth as your pet may not know who you are during a seizure and could bite you.
  • Know where to go in case of an emergency. Your regular veterinarian is a great place if the emergency occurs during the day. If the the emergency occurs in the evening or weekends it may be necessary to go to the emergency clinic in your area. Most are open 24 hours a day 7 days a week.
  • Ensure important phone numbers such as your veterinarian, emergency vet hospitals, or emergency contacts are easily accessible.
  • Pack a pet first aid kit. It is best if you can have one for her car, and one for at home use. Fill it not only with useful supplies, but also keep a copy of your pet’s medical records with your pets name, age, breed microchip number, vaccine history, and any pre-existing conditions.

This last point is especially helpful if you regularly use a pet sitter or babysitter and will ensure that this person will have all they need should an emergency arise.

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Do you know how to recognize and help someone who is choking?

Choking is a common cause of accidental death and often preventable. Objects such as food, candy or small objects can easily become lodged in the airway if they are accidentally ‘breathed in’ rather than swallowed.

Signs and symptoms of choking

  • Unable to speak or cough
  • Grasping or pointing to the throat
  • Distressed look on the face
  • First aid treatment of choking

Encourage the patient to cough, If the choking is only mild, this will clear the obstruction and the patient should be able to speak to you.

If the obstruction is not cleared:

Give back blows

Call for help, but don’t leave the patient yet.

Bend them forward so the head is lower than the chest. For a smaller child, you can place them over your knee to do this.

Give up to 5 firm blows between the shoulder blades with the palm of your hand. Check between blows and stop if you clear the obstruction.

If the obstruction is still not cleared:

Give abdominal thrusts

  • Stand behind the person and wrap your arms around the waist.
  • Place your clenched fist just above the person’s navel. Grab your fist with your other hand.
  • Quickly pull inward and upward as if trying to lift the person up.
  • Perform a total of 5 abdominal thrusts.
  • If the blockage is still not dislodged, continue cycles of 5 back blows and 5 abdominal thrusts until the object is coughed up or the person starts to breathe or cough.
  • Take the object out of his mouth only if you can see it. Never do a finger sweep unless you can see the object in the person’s mouth

Give CPR, if necessary

If the obstruction comes out, but the person is becomes unconscious, begin CPR.

Continue CPR until medical personnel arrives.

 

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Should you restrain a person having a seizure?

Approximately 1 out of 10 people have had a seizure. Because seizures are very common, it’s important to learn what to do to help keep that person safe until the seizure stops.

There are many types of seizures. Most seizures end in a few minutes.

These are general steps to help someone who is having any type seizure:

  • Stay with the person until the seizure ends and he or she is fully awake. After it ends, help the person sit in a safe place. Once they are alert and able to communicate, tell them what happened in very simple terms.
  • Comfort the person and speak calmly.
  • Check to see if the person is wearing a medical bracelet or other emergency information.
  • Keep yourself and other people calm.
  • Offer to call a taxi or another person to make sure the person gets home safely.

A seizure (fit) occurs due to excessive and disorganized electrical activity in our brain. A major seizure occurs when the victim falls to the ground and starts shaking uncontrollably. This is known as a tonic-clonic seizure or a grand mal seizure.

Victims of a major seizure are normally unconscious during the episode and not aware of their surroundings.

There are many myths about the correct first aid treatment for a victim having a seizure. One of these myths is around restraining a victim to stop them from injuring themselves – this is incorrect and potentially dangerous!

  • Do not hold the person down or try to stop his or her movements.
  • Do not put anything in the person’s mouth. This can injure teeth or the jaw. A person having a seizure cannot swallow his or her tongue.
  • Do not try to give mouth-to-mouth breaths (like CPR). People usually start -breathing again on their own after a seizure.
  • Do not offer the person water or food until he or she is fully alert.

Attempting to restrain the victim will not shorten the duration of the seizure or speed up the victim’s recovery. This myth has the potential to cause serious harm to a seizure victim.

The Correct First Aid Steps for a Seizure

The following first aid steps should be carried out for a victim having a major seizure (fit):

  • Call for emergency medical help
  • Move on any bystanders
  • Move away from any potential hazards from the victim and protect their head
  • Once the seizure finishes, roll the victim onto their side and ensure the airway is open and they are breathing
  • Don’t attempt to restrain the victim or place anything in their mouth
  • If the victim stops breathing then start CPR immediately and call for a defibrillator.

CDC Seizure First Aid

 

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What are the best way to manage insect bites and stings?

Common reactions to insect bites and stings are mild. Often causing little more than stinging, redness and itching or minor swelling. Rarely do insect bites and stings, such as from a bee, a wasp, a hornet, a fire ant or a scorpion, can result in severe reactions.

To take care of an insect bite or sting that causes a mild reaction:

  • Move to a safe area to avoid more bites or stings.
  • If needed, remove the stinger.
  • Wash the area with soap and water.
  • Apply a cool compress. Use a cloth dampened with cold water or filled with ice. This helps reduce pain and swelling. If the injury is on an arm or leg, elevate it.
  • Apply 0.5 or 1 percent hydrocortisone cream, calamine lotion or a baking soda paste to the bite or sting several times daily until your symptoms go away.
  • Take an antihistamine (Benadryl, others) to reduce itching.
  • Usually, the signs and symptoms of a bite or sting disappear in a day or two. If you’re concerned — even if your reaction is minor — call your doctor.

Call 911 or your local emergency number if the injured person experiences:

  • Difficulty breathing
  • Swelling of the lips, eyelids or throat
  • Dizziness, faintness or confusion
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Hives
  • Nausea, cramps or vomiting
  • A scorpion sting and is a child
  • Take these actions immediately while waiting for medical help:

Ask the person if he or she is carrying an epinephrine autoinjector (EpiPen, Auvi-Q, others) to treat an allergic attack.

If the person says he or she needs to use an autoinjector, ask whether you should help inject the medication. This is usually done by pressing the autoinjector against the person’s thigh and holding it in place for several seconds.

Loosen tight clothing and cover the person with a blanket. Don’t give him or her anything to drink.

If the person is vomiting, position him or her to prevent choking.

Begin CPR if the person shows no signs of circulation, such as breathing, coughing or movement.

For more information see this Mayo Clinic article

 

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First Aid Service – CPR Certification – First Aid Cabinet refill – Facility Services – First Aid – Safety Training


What’s the difference between a sprain and a strain, and what the heck is R.I.C.E Therapy?

Sprains and strains are often used interchangeably. While very common for a first responder to encounter, they are not the same thing.

Sprain

A sprain is a stretch or tear in a ligament. Ligaments are bands of fibrous tissue that connect bones to bones at joints.

Excessive force applied to a joint can cause these ligaments to tear – this is a sprain. Usually when a person falls, twists, or is hit in a way that forces the body out of its normal position.

The most common type of sprain is a sprained ankle. About 25,000 people sprain an ankle every day.

Strain

A strain is also a stretch or tear, but it happens in a muscle or a tendon. Tendons link muscles to the bones. This is very common in contact sports like football, boxing and hockey.

Treatment of sprains and strains

Although there is a difference between sprains and strains the first aid treatment of both is the same.

This is known as RICE therapy.

-Rest

-Ice

-Comfortable support / Compression

-Elevation

This simple first aid treatment will relieve swelling and subsequently relieve the pain from these injuries.

Always seek medical attention if the pain and swelling don’t start to lessens after 24 to 72 hours.

 

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Pet First Aid – What You Need To Know…

We love our pets right? But do we as pet owners know pet first aid? Here’s a quick list, meant as intermediary steps. You should also consult a veterinarian.

Pet First Aid

Do you know what to do during a pet emergency? Here are some common emergency tips:

  • If your cat or dog is dehydrated, pull up on the skin between the shoulder blades. It should spring right back; if it stays tented this is a sign of dehydration.
  • Signs of pet poisoning include bleeding externally or internally, dilated pupils, drooling or foaming at the mouth, seizures or other abnormal mental state or behavior. If suspect your pet has been poisoned, contact Animal Poison Control 888-426-4435
  • Signs of heat stroke or heat exhaustion include collapse; body temperature of 104 degrees F or above; bloody diarrhea or vomiting; wobbliness; excessive panting or difficulty breathing; increase heart rate; mucous membranes very red; and increased salivation.
  • Pets bitten by other animals need vet attention to prevent the wound (even if minor) from becoming infected and to check for internal wounds. You should never break up a dogfight yourself because you could be bitten.
  • If your pet is bleeding, apply direct pressure using gauze over the bleeding site. If blood soaks through, apply more gauze (do not removed soaked gauze) until you can reach a veterinary hospital.
  • If your pet has a seizure, make sure it is in a safe place, but do not restrain the animal. Keep your hands away from its mouth as your pet may not know who you are during a seizure and could bite you.
  • Know where to go in case of an emergency. Your regular veterinarian is a great place if the emergency occurs during the day. If the the emergency occurs in the evening or weekends it may be necessary to go to the emergency clinic in your area. Most are open 24 hours a day 7 days a week.
  • Ensure important phone numbers such as your veterinarian, emergency vet hospitals, or emergency contacts are easily accessible.
  • Pack a pet first aid kit. It is best if you can have one for her car, and one for at home use. Fill it not only with useful supplies, but also keep a copy of your pet’s medical records with your pets name, age, breed microchip number, vaccine history, and any pre-existing conditions.

This last point is especially helpful if you regularly use a pet sitter or babysitter and will ensure that this person will have all they need should an emergency arise.


Emergency Burn Care and Treatment

Seconds count, when burns occur. Burns need to be cooled immediately. Otherwise, the heat will continue to destroy the surrounding and underlying tissue, and may even progress into a second or third degree burn. This will present serious complications for the patient both in cost and on-going treatment.

How To Treat A Burn

Here are four critical steps you should take to treat a burn:

1  Immediately stop the burning process

2 Cool the burn, but don’t overcool the patient

3 Provide pain relief

4 Cover and protect the burn area against contamination

It is actually recommended that you don’t use ice. It can cause more damage and slow the healing process.1 It is recommended instead you use a burn dressing. Burn dressings are a gelatinized water mix designed to perform the four critical steps for burn management in one application. Because of their gelatinous nature, they seal the burn from further contamination, they cool the burn site and relieve pain by heat transfer into themselves, and the fluids on the burn site cannot soak into the dressing nor can they evaporate through them. And finally, as the burn site cools down, the dressing warms up, leaving the site covered by a warm dressing, helping to prevent hypothermia.

Burn Dressing will absorb temperatures which is extremely important. The additional gel within the burn gel pouch can be left on the wound for up to four hours prior to receiving further medical treatment if necessary.

Water Gel

Benefits of burn dressings

• Provides controlled cooling by convection, not evaporation

• Acts as a heat exchanger

• Absorbs heat throughout the gel contact are

• Conforms to the burn surface, providing total cooling contact

• Does not affect core body temperature or contribute to hypothermia

• Stops the burning process

• Portable—on the scene—when seconds count!

• Cools the burn, dissipates heat

• Provides pain relief

• Easy to use

• Evaporates slowly

• Use on any burn

• Non-adherent, easy to remove

• Covers and protects against contamination

• Helps prevent infection

• Water-soluble

• Won’t irritate the eyes, nose or mouth

All burns should be treated with concern. It is important to keep in mind the golden rule of burn management: If someone has a burn on his or her body exceeding the size of the palm of his or her own hand, where blisters are present, burns to genitalia, face or to any flexion point, this person should seek medical attention. All electrical burns require medical attention.

1 https://www.healthline.com/health/burns#modal-close

 

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Call 1-800-869-7970 to learn about Onsite First Aid Services for your business

 

Click on the “Live Chat” button

 

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Four Critical Steps To Burn Treatment

Seconds count, when burns occur.

Burns need to be cooled immediately. Otherwise, the heat will continue to destroy the surrounding and underlying tissue, and may even progress into a second or third degree burn. This will present serious complications for the patient both in cost and on-going treatment.

Here are four critical steps you should take to treat a burn:

  1. Immediately stop the burning process
  2. Cool the burn, but don’t overcool the patient
  3. Provide pain relief
  4. Cover and protect the burn area against contamination

First Aid Service

It is actually recommended that you don’t use ice. It can cause more damage and slow the healing process.1 It is recommended instead you use a burn dressing. Burn dressings are a gelatinized water mix designed to perform the four critical steps for burn management in one application. Because of their gelatinous nature, they seal the burn from further contamination, they cool the burn site and relieve pain by heat transfer into themselves, and the fluids on the burn site cannot soak into the dressing nor can they evaporate through them. And finally, as the burn site cools down, the dressing warms up, leaving the site covered by a warm dressing, helping to prevent hypothermia.

Burn Dressing will absorb temperatures which is extremely important. The additional gel within the burn gel pouch can be left on the wound for up to four hours prior to receiving further medical treatment if necessary.

Benefits of burn dressings

  • Provides controlled cooling by convection, not evaporation
  • Acts as a heat exchanger
  • Absorbs heat throughout the gel contact are
  • Conforms to the burn surface, providing total cooling contact
  • Does not affect core body temperature or contribute to hypothermia
  • Stops the burning process
  • Portable—on the scene—when seconds count!
  • Cools the burn, dissipates heat
  • Provides pain relief
  • Easy to use
  • Evaporates slowly
  • Use on any burn
  • Non-adherent, easy to remove
  • Covers and protects against contamination
  • Helps prevent infection
  • Water-soluble
  • Won’t irritate the eyes, nose or mouth

All burns should be treated with concern. It is important to keep in mind the golden rule of burn management: If someone has a burn on his or her body exceeding the size of the palm of his or her own hand, where blisters are present, burns to genitalia, face or to any flexion point, this person should seek medical attention. All electrical burns require medical attention.

  1. https://www.healthline.com/health/burns#modal-close

 

Click here to shop for burn care products

Do you need First Aid Service for your company? Call 1-800-869-7970 to learn about Onsite First Aid Services for your business or click on the “Live Chat” button on the right side of your screen

 


Understanding Hi-Viz Apparel Requirements

WestChestergear.com VIZ UP - STAND OUT
WestChestergear.com VIZ UP – STAND OUT

ANSI/ISEA 107-2015

The first thing to understand is the ANSI/ISEA 107-2015 standard. This is a voluntary standard that provides guidelines on what qualifies as an approved fluorescent material; and what level of coverage and reflective tape are required to qualify as for various classes and types of garments.

This standard was designed for industries like utility, emergency responders, maintenance, construction, airport personnel and many roadside workers exposed to potential injuries due to low visibility on the job.

ANSI Hi-VIZ GARMENT CLASSES AND TYPES

ANSI 107 establishes four performance classes (Class 1, Class 2, Class 3, and Class E) and three garment types (Type O, Type R and Type P). Performance class and garment type are co-dependent, which means that to qualify under the ANSI standard, the apparel must have both a class and a type (not just one or the other).

Performance Class 1 offers the minimum amount of high-visibility materials needed to differentiate the wearer from non-complex work environments. On the other side of the spectrum is Class 3, which offers the greatest amount of high-visibility materials to allow for the best definition of the human form in both complex backgrounds and through a full range of movement. In addition, Class E describes pants or bibs that do not qualify as meeting the requirements of any of the other classes when worn alone, however when they are worn together with a Class 2 or Class 3 garment, the overall classification of the ensemble is Class 3.

Garment Type O is intended for work that takes place off-road or in controlled environments, such as parking lots, festivals, warehouses and factories. Garment Type R is intended for roadways or other environments with moving traffic or equipment, and is the minimum level of protection permitted for workers exposed to roadway rights-of-way, including roadway, construction, transportation, traffic-control, DOT, and airport ramp workers. This garment type represents the vast majority of hi-viz apparel on the market. Finally, Type P garments are intended for public safety workers, including emergency/incident response, police, fire, and EMS. Type P garments are permitted to be worn in the same environments as Type R garments, however they make accommodations for the additional gear required by those professions.

Contact Green Guard for a free consultation of your safety and PPE program.

Source: WestChester Gear