Visitor Monitoring

Emergency burn care and treatment

Seconds count, when burns occur. Burns need to be cooled immediately. Otherwise, the heat will continue to destroy the surrounding and underlying tissue, and may even progress into a second or third degree burn. This will present serious complications for the patient both in cost and on-going treatment.

Here are four critical steps you should take to treat a burn:

  1. Immediately stop the burning process
  2. Cool the burn, but don’t overcool the patient
  3. Provide pain relief
  4. Cover and protect the burn area against contamination

It is actually recommended that you don’t use ice. It can cause more damage and slow the healing process.1 It is recommended instead you use a burn dressing. Burn dressings are a gelatinized water mix designed to perform the four critical steps for burn management in one application. Because of their gelatinous nature, they seal the burn from further contamination, they cool the burn site and relieve pain by heat transfer into themselves, and the fluids on the burn site cannot soak into the dressing nor can they evaporate through them. And finally, as the burn site cools down, the dressing warms up, leaving the site covered by a warm dressing, helping to prevent hypothermia.

Burn Dressing will absorb temperatures which is extremely important. The additional gel within the burn gel pouch can be left on the wound for up to four hours prior to receiving further medical treatment if necessary.

Benefits of burn dressings

  • Provides controlled cooling by convection, not evaporation
  • Acts as a heat exchanger
  • Absorbs heat throughout the gel contact area
  • Conforms to the burn surface, providing total cooling contact
  • Does not affect core body temperature or contribute to hypothermia
  • Stops the burning process
  • Portable—on the scene—when seconds count!
  • Cools the burn, dissipates heat
  • Provides pain relief
  • Easy to use
  • Evaporates slowly
  • Use on any burn
  • Non-adherent, easy to remove
  • Covers and protects against contamination
  • Helps prevent infection
  • Water-soluble
  • Won’t irritate the eyes, nose or mouth

All burns should be treated with concern. It is important to keep in mind the golden rule of burn management: If someone has a burn on his or her body exceeding the size of the palm of his or her own hand, where blisters are present, burns to genitalia, face or to any flexion point, this person should seek medical attention. All electrical burns require medical attention.

  1. https://www.healthline.com/health/burns#modal-close

Pet first aid – For owners

With April being Pet First Aid Awareness month, below we list of a number of quick tips. This list is meant as intermediary steps. You should also consult a veterinarian.

Pet First Aid

Do you know what to do during a pet emergency? Here are some common emergency tips:

  • If your cat or dog is dehydrated, pull up on the skin between the shoulder blades. It should spring right back; if it stays tented this is a sign of dehydration.
  • Signs of pet poisoning include bleeding externally or internally, dilated pupils, drooling or foaming at the mouth, seizures or other abnormal mental state or behavior. If suspect your pet has been poisoned, contact Animal Poison Control 888-426-4435
  • Signs of heat stroke or heat exhaustion include collapse; body temperature of 104 degrees F or above; bloody diarrhea or vomiting; wobbliness; excessive panting or difficulty breathing; increase heart rate; mucous membranes very red; and increased salivation.
  • Pets bitten by other animals need vet attention to prevent the wound (even if minor) from becoming infected and to check for internal wounds. You should never break up a dogfight yourself because you could be bitten.
  • If your pet is bleeding, apply direct pressure using gauze over the bleeding site. If blood soaks through, apply more gauze (do not removed soaked gauze) until you can reach a veterinary hospital.
  • If your pet has a seizure, make sure it is in a safe place, but do not restrain the animal. Keep your hands away from its mouth as your pet may not know who you are during a seizure and could bite you.
  • Know where to go in case of an emergency. Your regular veterinarian is a great place if the emergency occurs during the day. If the the emergency occurs in the evening or weekends it may be necessary to go to the emergency clinic in your area. Most are open 24 hours a day 7 days a week.
  • Ensure important phone numbers such as your veterinarian, emergency vet hospitals, or emergency contacts are easily accessible.
  • Pack a pet first aid kit. It is best if you can have one for her car, and one for at home use. Fill it not only with useful supplies, but also keep a copy of your pet’s medical records with your pets name, age, breed microchip number, vaccine history, and any pre-existing conditions.

This last point is especially helpful if you regularly use a pet sitter or babysitter and will ensure that this person will have all they need should an emergency arise.


Work Zone Safety: Everybody’s Responsibility

April 9-13 is designated National Work Zone Awareness Week. This week is designed to bring attention to motorist and worker safety and mobility issues in work zones.

  • Over the last 5 years 4,400 people have died and 200,000 injured in work zone crashes.
  • Drivers are the most frequent fatality in work zone crashes.
  • Most work zone fatalities involve working-age adults.
  • Rear-end crashes (running into the rear of a slowing or stopping vehicle) are the most common type of work zone crash.
  • Fatal work zone crashes occur most often in summer and fall.
  • The majority of fatal work zone crashes occurred on roads with speed limits greater than 50 mph.
  • Stopping distance for motor vehicles at 50 mph:

-Dry roadway300 ft

-Wet roadway400 ft

-Icy pavement1250 ft

  • A loaded 80,000 lb. tractor-trailer requires almost 50% more stopping distance.
  • It takes only an extra 25 seconds to cover 1 mile at 45 mph compared to 65 mph.

Tips for the Driver

  • Stay Alert and Minimize Distractions
  • Keep Your Headlights On
  • Pay Attention to the Road
  • Merge into the Proper Lane
  • Don’t Tailgate
  • Obey the Posted Speed Limit
  • Change Lanes Safely
  • Follow Instructions form Flaggers
  • Expect the Unexpected

BE PATIENT

Additional resources

FHWA-Developed Resources PDF

Trucking Safely Through Work Zones PDF


American Heart Association introduces new mobile app

My Cardiac Coach

Heart attack is scary and confusing. Recovery shouldn’t be.

My Cardiac Coach app available on the Apple App Store or the Google Play is designed to be a personalized recovery toolkit on your smartphone.

• Trustworthy information from the experts at the American Heart Association

• Interactive lessons to help you learn what you need to know

• Progress-trackers for monitoring blood pressure and weight

• Tools for logging physical activity and managing medications

• Connections to other survivors through our Support Network

heart.org


Is your First Aid program complaint with the latest ANSI Standards?

ANSI (American National Standards Institute) Minimum Requirements for Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies (ANSI Z308.1) establishes the minimum requirements for first aid kit supplies. First aid kits are classified based on the assortment and quantity of first aid supplies intended to deal with most types of injuries and sudden illnesses that may be encountered in the workplace.

5.1.1 Class A Kit’s

Class A first aid kits are intended to provide a basic range of products to deal with most common types of injuries encountered in the workplace including: major wounds, minor wounds (cuts and abrasions), minor burns and eye injuries. First aid kits designated as Class A shall contain the assortment of compliant supplies in the quantities specified in the table below.

FA Small Cab

ANSI First Aid Standards

5.1.2 Class B Kits 

Class B kits are intended to provide a broader range and quantity of supplies to deal with injuries encountered in more populated, complex and/or high risk workplace environments. First aid kits designated as Class B shall contain the assortment of compliant supplies in the quantities specified in the table below.

ANSI Class B Cabinet

For more information about First Aid Cabinet Service click here or Call: 800-869-6970


US Supreme Court of Appeals upheld OSHA silica dust regulations

Is your company in compliance with the new OSHA Silica Standard?

OSHA’s new silica dust exposure standard went into effect September 23rd last year, but the agency delayed enforcement until Oct. 23 to give employers more time to comply. This is the first update to the silica standard since the first one was established in 1971, the same year OSHA was formed.

Silica dust particles are 100 times smaller than sand granules, and those who breathe in too much can develop illnesses like the incurable and potentially fatal lung disease silicosis, lung cancer, kidney disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Respiratory Protection was the 4th most cited OSHA fine last year

Those employers not in compliance with the new rule could be hit with an OSHA fine of $12,675 for a serious or other-than-serious violation; $12,675 per day past the abatement date for a failure-to-abate violation and $126,749 for a repeated or willful violation. One organization was fined over $500,000 for non compliance.

OSHA CFR 1910.134 (f) (2)

“The employer shall ensure that an employee using a tight-fitting face piece respirator is fit tested prior to initial use of the respirator, whenever a different respirator face piece (size, style, model or make) is used, and at least annually thereafter”.

Need help with your respiratory program? 

Call: 800-869-6970

Click here OSHA silica rules
Click here for the OSHA Silica fact sheet