Visitor Monitoring

Barnhart Crane CPR Class

A big thanks to the team at Barnhart Crane (Jeremy and Greg pictured) practicing CPR during CPR training.

Want to learn CPR? Click here to learn more or call 800-380-9119


4 Tips to Avoid Occupational Back Injuries

Safety First

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), more than one million workers experience back injuries each year. One fourth of all workers compensation indemnity claims are a result of back injuries. Low back pain is one of the most common reason that people miss work, second only to the common cold. In America, we spend more than $100 billion annually in medical bills, disability and lost productivity at work from back injuries and illnesses. More importantly, this problem causes unnecessary discomfort and pain to workers which can have a devastating effect on their lifestyle and ability to work. A BLS survey shows that 75% of back injuries occurred while performing lifting tasks, which underscores the importance of reducing back injuries caused by lifting.

#1 – Work Smart

Always warm – Up your back and legs before performing any lifting task! We are ALL athletes in life, so we need to warm-up our body to improve performance and to reduce risk of injury. It’s important to prepare your body for work.

Low Back Rotation Stretch – Stand with hands on hips. Stabilizing the hips and legs, gently roll your upper body forward, right, backward, and left to stretch your lower back. Perform 5 slow circles gradually expanding the circle each time. Repeat in the opposite direction.

Hamstring & Achilles Stretch – Position your body with one leg forward and the toes of that foot raised up. Keep your back straight while you bend forward at the waist. You should feel a stretch in the back of your thigh and knee. Then shift your weight onto your forward leg and bend knee, keep the back leg straight and heel on floor. Hold each stretch for 20 seconds. Perform each stretch 2 times for each leg.

#2 – Before You Lift

  • Know what you are lifting and how you will lift it.
  • Be aware of the weight of the object.
  • Determine whether or not it’s safe to lift on your own.
  • Make sure the work area is flat, dry and clear of debris. CHECK YOUR PATHWAY
  • Make sure the lift pathway is clear .
  • Remove any tripping hazards or debris.
  • Check for any wet or slick surfaces.

#3 – USE ERGONOMIC EQUIPMENT

  • Use lift assists, forklift, dolly, cart, hand truck or hoist .
  • Make sure you are trained before using the equipment.

#4 – GET HELP WHEN NEEDED

  • When lifting awkward or heavy loads, utilize a two person lift .
  • Make sure you lift at the same time and keep the load level. WEAR PROPER PPE
  • Wear proper required protective shoes and gloves.

Contact Green Guard today to help you with you safety and PPE needs.


Are your eyewash stations OSHA/ANSI compliant?

Fendall Pureflow 1000
Fendall Pureflow 1000

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention states that each day about 2,000 U.S. worker have a job-related eye injury that requires medical treatment. Chemical burns to one or both eyes are common.

Many of these injuries can result in blindness. Proper safety equipment, such as eye protection and eyewash stations can save a worker’s eyesight.

OSHA on Compliance

The General Requirements in section 29 CFR (Code of Federal Regulations) 1910.151 states “…where the eyes or body of any person may be exposed to injurious corrosive materials, suitable facilities for quick drenching or flushing of the eyes and body shall be provided within the work area for immediate emergency use.”

American National Standards Institute

(ANSI) Standard Z358.1-2014 sets universal minimum performance and use requirements for all eyewash stations and drench shower equipment.

ANSI standard Z358.1-2014 says an eyewash station must:

  • Be accessible within a 10-second walk from the hazard
  • Be accessible without the need to walk up or down stairs, ladders, or cross any obstacles or roadways etc.
  • Deliver a 15-minute continuous flow of tepid fluid at 0.4 gallons per minute and be 60-100°F
  • Be located in areas where caustic or hazardous substances are present
  • Activate in one second or less and with one single motion
  • Be unobstructed
  • Be highly visible and identified with a sign

Where to place your emergency eyewash station

According to ANSI standards, the following areas must meet emergency eyewash compliance guidelines:

  • Painting and solvent operations
  • Battery charging stations
  • Tool parts washers
  • Laboratories
  • Hazardous chemical storage
  • Chemical pumping and/or mixing areas
  • Anywhere you use a chemical that has SDS eyewash requirements

If you need more information contact Green Guard today for a free consultation.


Cardiac arrest survival increase when bystanders use an AED

According to a recent study in the Circulation Journal Report, Survival from cardiac arrest doubled when bystanders stepped in to use a publicly available automated external defibrillator rather than waiting for emergency responders to arrive.

The study showed that the longer it takes to emergency personnel to arrive, the greater the benefit of a bystander using an AED to shock the victim.

Victims who received a defibrillator shock from a bystander had far greater chances at survival and being discharged from the hospital than those that did not.

  • Bystanders used an AED in 18.8% of these cases.
  • Cardiac arrest victims who received a shock from a publicly-available AED had far greater chances of survival and being discharged from the hospital than those who did not; 66.5% versus 43%.
  • Cardiac arrest victims who received a shock from a publicly-available AED that was administered by a bystander had 2.62 times higher odds of survival to hospital discharge and 2.73 times more favorable outcomes for functioning compared to victims who first received an AED shock after emergency responders arrived.
  • Victims who received an AED shock from a bystander (57.1%) using a publicly-available device instead of having to wait for emergency responders (32.7%) had near normal function and better outcomes.
  • Without a bystander using AED shock therapy, 70% of cardiac arrest patients either died or survived with impaired brain function.

To learn more about CPR and AED’s contact your Green Guard representative for more information.


Emergency burn care and treatment

Seconds count, when burns occur. Burns need to be cooled immediately. Otherwise, the heat will continue to destroy the surrounding and underlying tissue, and may even progress into a second or third degree burn. This will present serious complications for the patient both in cost and on-going treatment.

Here are four critical steps you should take to treat a burn:

  1. Immediately stop the burning process
  2. Cool the burn, but don’t overcool the patient
  3. Provide pain relief
  4. Cover and protect the burn area against contamination

It is actually recommended that you don’t use ice. It can cause more damage and slow the healing process.1 It is recommended instead you use a burn dressing. Burn dressings are a gelatinized water mix designed to perform the four critical steps for burn management in one application. Because of their gelatinous nature, they seal the burn from further contamination, they cool the burn site and relieve pain by heat transfer into themselves, and the fluids on the burn site cannot soak into the dressing nor can they evaporate through them. And finally, as the burn site cools down, the dressing warms up, leaving the site covered by a warm dressing, helping to prevent hypothermia.

Burn Dressing will absorb temperatures which is extremely important. The additional gel within the burn gel pouch can be left on the wound for up to four hours prior to receiving further medical treatment if necessary.

Benefits of burn dressings

  • Provides controlled cooling by convection, not evaporation
  • Acts as a heat exchanger
  • Absorbs heat throughout the gel contact area
  • Conforms to the burn surface, providing total cooling contact
  • Does not affect core body temperature or contribute to hypothermia
  • Stops the burning process
  • Portable—on the scene—when seconds count!
  • Cools the burn, dissipates heat
  • Provides pain relief
  • Easy to use
  • Evaporates slowly
  • Use on any burn
  • Non-adherent, easy to remove
  • Covers and protects against contamination
  • Helps prevent infection
  • Water-soluble
  • Won’t irritate the eyes, nose or mouth

All burns should be treated with concern. It is important to keep in mind the golden rule of burn management: If someone has a burn on his or her body exceeding the size of the palm of his or her own hand, where blisters are present, burns to genitalia, face or to any flexion point, this person should seek medical attention. All electrical burns require medical attention.

  1. https://www.healthline.com/health/burns#modal-close

Benefits of Using a Learning Management System (LMS)

1. Centralized content

Having all of your content in one place instead of spread across many different drives and devices makes for easier management and structure of the materials. By having everything in a centralized location, every member of your team can access the information. This ensures that every user sees the same content in the same manner.

2. Provides unlimited access to course materials

Once the content is loaded into your LMS, your employees have access to the information when it’s needed. They can access it when it is convenient for them and their work schedule.

3. Tracking and reporting

Utilizing an LMS gives you the ability to track your employees progress to ensure they are meeting their training and learning requirements. With an LMS you can access various reports and analytics to allow you to better focus on areas that may require more training or education. You also have the ability to make changes or updates to your course material at any time based on the feedback and results you receive through your LMS reports.

4. Material is easily updated

Unlike DVD’s or even on site instructors, having an LMS makes it easier to keep your material updated with the latest information or standards. Because everything is centralized, it is simple to make a change to the forms, requirements, specifications, or products as necessary. All users will receive the updated information at the same time.

5. An LMS grows with you

Having your LMS allows you to continually at content as your company grows and your business needs change. You simply login, make the necessary changes or add the new content. This will help you and your company stay ahead stay agile and grow and adapt more easily.

6. Compliance regulations

Keeping up with the various compliance regulations for your growing company can be daunting. That’s why having an LMS can be invaluable. Updating a traditional course with print outs, videos, or binders. Can be costly and time consuming. Using an LMS can give you the ability to add new compliance standards or make updates in a matter of minutes.

If you are interested in learning more about an LMS sytem for your company or have compliance training needs, contact Green Guard today.


Understanding eyewash stations and their requirements

Fendall Pureflow 1000
Fendall Pureflow 1000

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention states that each day about 2,000 U.S. worker have a job-related eye injury that requires medical treatment. Chemical burns to one or both eyes are common.

Many of these injuries can result in blindness. Proper safety equipment, such as eye protection and eyewash stations can save a worker’s eyesight.

OSHA on Compliance

The General Requirements in section 29 CFR (Code of Federal Regulations) 1910.151 states “…where the eyes or body of any person may be exposed to injurious corrosive materials, suitable facilities for quick drenching or flushing of the eyes and body shall be provided within the work area for immediate emergency use.”

American National Standards Institute

(ANSI) Standard Z358.1-2014 sets universal minimum performance and use requirements for all eyewash stations and drench shower equipment.

ANSI standard Z358.1-2014 says an eyewash station must:

  • Be accessible within a 10-second walk from the hazard
  • Be accessible without the need to walk up or down stairs, ladders, or cross any obstacles or roadways etc.
  • Deliver a 15-minute continuous flow of tepid fluid at 0.4 gallons per minute and be 60-100°F
  • Be located in areas where caustic or hazardous substances are present
  • Activate in one second or less and with one single motion
  • Be unobstructed
  • Be highly visible and identified with a sign

Where to place your emergency eyewash station

According to ANSI standards, the following areas must meet emergency eyewash compliance guidelines:

  • Painting and solvent operations
  • Battery charging stations
  • Tool parts washers
  • Laboratories
  • Hazardous chemical storage
  • Chemical pumping and/or mixing areas
  • Anywhere you use a chemical that has SDS eyewash requirements

If you need more information contact Green Guard today for a free consultation.


Woman who collapsed in Publix restroom saved with CPR

Renee Gold (Pictured left) and Kamilla Soares (right). Photo courtesy of myPalmBeachPost

Kamilla Soares, who recently became a paramedic was next door to Publix when she received an alert on her phone that someone needed CPR.

Kamilla, and a Publix Customer Service Manager Renee Gold performed life saving CPR.

Renee Gold found the woman in the bathroom stall.

“I had to pull her out from underneath. I had 911 on the phone, and they were telling me to check, ‘Was she breathing?’” Gold said. “She was gasping for air.”

Gold began doing CPR when Soares arrived. Together with the help of 9-1-1 dispatcher they performed CPR until Palm Beach Gardens Fire and Rescue arrived.

The woman was later released form the hospital.

”You guys definitely went above and beyond,” said Cory Bessette, Palm Beach Gardens Fire Rescue Division Chief of EMS. “Whether you’re medically trained or not, you can do CPR.”

Source: myPalmBeachPost


We all play a role in ending distracted driving


Cellphones are among the top reasons for being distracted while driving. We are so use to looking at our phones every time we hear the unmistakeable ding, or see that we have a new notification, that even when we are doing something as serious as operating a motor vehicle, we are compelled to see what just arrived in our inboxes.

Technology in vehicle is causing us to be more distracted than ever before. 53% of drivers believe that if manufactures put “infotainment” dashboard systems and hands-free technology in vehicles, they must be safe.1

While some states are implementing bans on the use of hand held devices, many drivers believe making the transitions to hands free voice assistants is the safe choice. In reality however, these technologies distract our brains even long after you’ve used them.

Make no mistake: This multitasking technology is about convenience, not safety.

#JustDrive

Source:NSC.org

  1. http://www.nsc.org/learn/NSC-Initiatives/Pages/distracted-driving.aspx

Pet first aid – For owners

With April being Pet First Aid Awareness month, below we list of a number of quick tips. This list is meant as intermediary steps. You should also consult a veterinarian.

Pet First Aid

Do you know what to do during a pet emergency? Here are some common emergency tips:

  • If your cat or dog is dehydrated, pull up on the skin between the shoulder blades. It should spring right back; if it stays tented this is a sign of dehydration.
  • Signs of pet poisoning include bleeding externally or internally, dilated pupils, drooling or foaming at the mouth, seizures or other abnormal mental state or behavior. If suspect your pet has been poisoned, contact Animal Poison Control 888-426-4435
  • Signs of heat stroke or heat exhaustion include collapse; body temperature of 104 degrees F or above; bloody diarrhea or vomiting; wobbliness; excessive panting or difficulty breathing; increase heart rate; mucous membranes very red; and increased salivation.
  • Pets bitten by other animals need vet attention to prevent the wound (even if minor) from becoming infected and to check for internal wounds. You should never break up a dogfight yourself because you could be bitten.
  • If your pet is bleeding, apply direct pressure using gauze over the bleeding site. If blood soaks through, apply more gauze (do not removed soaked gauze) until you can reach a veterinary hospital.
  • If your pet has a seizure, make sure it is in a safe place, but do not restrain the animal. Keep your hands away from its mouth as your pet may not know who you are during a seizure and could bite you.
  • Know where to go in case of an emergency. Your regular veterinarian is a great place if the emergency occurs during the day. If the the emergency occurs in the evening or weekends it may be necessary to go to the emergency clinic in your area. Most are open 24 hours a day 7 days a week.
  • Ensure important phone numbers such as your veterinarian, emergency vet hospitals, or emergency contacts are easily accessible.
  • Pack a pet first aid kit. It is best if you can have one for her car, and one for at home use. Fill it not only with useful supplies, but also keep a copy of your pet’s medical records with your pets name, age, breed microchip number, vaccine history, and any pre-existing conditions.

This last point is especially helpful if you regularly use a pet sitter or babysitter and will ensure that this person will have all they need should an emergency arise.