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We all play a role in ending distracted driving


Cellphones are among the top reasons for being distracted while driving. We are so use to looking at our phones every time we hear the unmistakeable ding, or see that we have a new notification, that even when we are doing something as serious as operating a motor vehicle, we are compelled to see what just arrived in our inboxes.

Technology in vehicle is causing us to be more distracted than ever before. 53% of drivers believe that if manufactures put “infotainment” dashboard systems and hands-free technology in vehicles, they must be safe.1

While some states are implementing bans on the use of hand held devices, many drivers believe making the transitions to hands free voice assistants is the safe choice. In reality however, these technologies distract our brains even long after you’ve used them.

Make no mistake: This multitasking technology is about convenience, not safety.

#JustDrive

Source:NSC.org

  1. http://www.nsc.org/learn/NSC-Initiatives/Pages/distracted-driving.aspx

Pet first aid – For owners

With April being Pet First Aid Awareness month, below we list of a number of quick tips. This list is meant as intermediary steps. You should also consult a veterinarian.

Pet First Aid

Do you know what to do during a pet emergency? Here are some common emergency tips:

  • If your cat or dog is dehydrated, pull up on the skin between the shoulder blades. It should spring right back; if it stays tented this is a sign of dehydration.
  • Signs of pet poisoning include bleeding externally or internally, dilated pupils, drooling or foaming at the mouth, seizures or other abnormal mental state or behavior. If suspect your pet has been poisoned, contact Animal Poison Control 888-426-4435
  • Signs of heat stroke or heat exhaustion include collapse; body temperature of 104 degrees F or above; bloody diarrhea or vomiting; wobbliness; excessive panting or difficulty breathing; increase heart rate; mucous membranes very red; and increased salivation.
  • Pets bitten by other animals need vet attention to prevent the wound (even if minor) from becoming infected and to check for internal wounds. You should never break up a dogfight yourself because you could be bitten.
  • If your pet is bleeding, apply direct pressure using gauze over the bleeding site. If blood soaks through, apply more gauze (do not removed soaked gauze) until you can reach a veterinary hospital.
  • If your pet has a seizure, make sure it is in a safe place, but do not restrain the animal. Keep your hands away from its mouth as your pet may not know who you are during a seizure and could bite you.
  • Know where to go in case of an emergency. Your regular veterinarian is a great place if the emergency occurs during the day. If the emergency occurs in the evening or weekends it may be necessary to go to the emergency clinic in your area. Most are open 24 hours a day 7 days a week.
  • Ensure important phone numbers such as your veterinarian, emergency vet hospitals, or emergency contacts are easily accessible.
  • Pack a pet first aid kit. It is best if you can have one for her car, and one for at home use. Fill it not only with useful supplies, but also keep a copy of your pet’s medical records with your pets name, age, breed microchip number, vaccine history, and any pre-existing conditions.

This last point is especially helpful if you regularly use a pet sitter or babysitter and will ensure that this person will have all they need should an emergency arise.

 

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Starbucks barista performs CPR

Natasha Stapp, a barista at Starbucks stepped forward to perform CPR on a stranger when Chris Smith collapsed on the sidewalk out front of the store.

“One of the things that I love the most is being able to change somebody’s day,” Stapp said

Chris Smith suffered what is nicknamed the Widowmaker Heart Attack. It is a heart problem so deadly, that only about 5% of individuals with it survive. They Widowmaker is when 95% or more blockage occurs in the main artery that supplies the front wall of the heart. If left untreated, it causes the entire firing wall of the heart to die.

Thanks to Natasha’s actions and the help of the 9-1-1 operator, Chris Smith is alive to today.

“The details seem kind of homely, but my wife and I were able to celebrate a 52nd wedding anniversary and I watched two of our grandkids graduate. None of that would have happened if Natasha wouldn’t have been there. Without her CPR work, there wouldn’t have been anything for the paramedics to revive,” said Smith.

Source: Kens5


CPR Classes – Corporate and Group Classes April 23rd – 27th

CPR & First Aid – Corporate and Group Classes April 23rd – 27th

Green Guard offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, Green Guard’s CPR, AED and first aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2 year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

For more information;

Call 800-380-9119

 


Understanding the different types of hard hats

Har hats are designed to protect one of the most important parts of the human body. But did you know that there are different types and classes of hard hats. Make sure that you are using the right class of hard hat for the job.

The American National Standards Institute ANSI has put together a list to help ensure you have the right protection for the job.

ANSI Types of Hard Hats

According to ANSI Z89.1 all hard hats can be divided into two types. Type I and Type II.

  • Type I: Have a full brim around the entire hat. These are only mean to to protect workers from object blows that come from above and strike the top of the helmet.
  • Type II Have a short brim only in front. These hard hats are designed to offer protection from lateral blows and objects. This includes front and back, and side as well as top. These hard hats are also test for off-center penetration resistance and chin strap retention. Type II are the most commonly found hard hat in use.

ANSI Classes of Hard Hats

Hard Hats are also divided into classes to indicate how well they protect against shock.

  • Class E (Electrical) Can withstand up to 20,000 volts of electricity
  • Class G (General) Can withstand up to 2,200 colts of electricity
  • Class C (Conductive) These offer no protection from electric shock

Materials & Suspension

Most hard hats are made of non-conductive, high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and come equipped with a suspension that can be adjusted for a custom fit. Suspensions are available with 4, 6, or 8 load-bearing points and can be fitted using several different types of adjustments. The most common are pinlock, where the hard hat is removed and a pin is matched to a corresponding hole, and ratchet, which uses a knob to tighten or loosen the suspension’s fit around the head while wearing the hard hat.

Styles

When considering tasks and situations, hard hats are available in different styles. Cap hard hats have a short front brim that helps to shade the face from the sun and keeps rain away from the eyes. Some cap hard hats can also be worn backwards so the front brim is over the back of the neck. Full brim styles feature a brim that goes around the entire cap and shades the face, back of the neck, and ears. The full brim can also help to channel rain and snow away from the face and head.


Work Zone Safety: Everybody’s Responsibility

April 8th -12th is designated National Work Zone Awareness Week. This week is designed to bring attention to motorist and worker safety and mobility issues in work zones.

  • Over the last 5 years, 4,400 people have died and 200,000 injured in work zone crashes.
  • Drivers are the most frequent fatality in work zone crashes.
  • Most work zone fatalities involve working-age adults.
  • Rear-end crashes (running into the rear of a slowing or stopping vehicle) are the most common type of work zone crash.
  • Fatal work zone crashes occur most often in summer and fall.
  • The majority of fatal work zone crashes occurred on roads with speed limits greater than 50 mph.
  • Stopping distance for motor vehicles at 50 mph:

                   -Dry roadway300 ft

                   -Wet roadway400 ft

                   -Icy pavement1250 ft

  • A loaded 80,000 lb. tractor-trailer requires almost 50% more stopping distance.
  • It takes only an extra 25 seconds to cover 1 mile at 45 mph compared to 65 mph.

Tips for the Driver

  • Stay Alert and Minimize Distractions
  • Keep Your Headlights On
  • Pay Attention to the Road
  • Merge into the Proper Lane
  • Don’t Tailgate
  • Obey the Posted Speed Limit
  • Change Lanes Safely
  • Follow Instructions form Flaggers
  • Expect the Unexpected

BE PATIENT

Additional resources

FHWA-Developed Resources PDF

Trucking Safely Through Work Zones PDF

 

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Distracted Driving Awareness Month

April is Distracted Driving Awareness Month 2018

Each day in the United Sates approximately 9 people are killed and more than 1,000 injured in in crashes that are reported to involve a distracted driver.1

Motor vehicle fatalities are up 6% from 2015, with more than 40,000 people killed in 2017.

Types of Distractions

  • Cell Phones
  • Dashboard infotainment systems
  • Struggling with voice assistants

Then the more serious

  • Drunk driving
  • Drowsy driving
  • Drugged driving

All of these distractions pose a threat to our safety.

Taking your eyes off the road for just one second can change a life forever.

Support the Just Drive campaign by using #JustDrive2

  1. National Center for Statistics and Analysis. Distracted Driving: 2015, in Traffic Safety Research Notes. DOT HS 812 381. March 2017, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration: Washington, D.C.
  2. http://www.nsc.org/learn/NSC-Initiatives/Pages/distracted-driving-awareness-month.aspx

Teen’s quick acting saves life with CPR

Nineteen year old Hannah Evans was at home getting ready to leave for work. When she looked outside and saw family friend Becky Garverick, who had been helping Hannah’s parents cut their lawn. Suddenly Hannah saw Becky collapse to the ground.

Hannah rushed out to the yard and checked for a pulse and immediately began chest compressions. She called 911 and continued with chest compressions.

“At one point while doing CPR, I lost Becky’s pulse. But I just kept going,” she explained.

Hannah is a nursing student at NC State in Mansfield. She learned CPR while attending Pioneer Career and Technology Center as a medical technology student.

Hannah had never performed CPR on an actual person until that day, and if she hadn’t been trained to do so, Becky Garverick knows she would not be here today.

Source: Galion Inquirer


Runner’s life saved by CPR

Shortly after finishing his race, Andy Martin collapsed due to a heart attack.

Ryan Sanders who is an athletic trainer and a Furman University police officer, preformed CPR and used an AED to save Andy Martin’s life.

“You go to the mall and something happens you might be the person walking by, and AEDs walk you through what to do so I just urge people to grab it and it will tell you what you need to do,” Sanders said.

Source: WSPA

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Hockey goalie makes a different kind of save

Oliver Urrego sprang into action March 1 when an opposing player collapsed on the ice during an adult league hockey game at Twin Rinks Ice Pavilion in Buffalo Grove.

While the goaltender on Napholz’s team, Mike Tuntland, started CPR, Urrego, 33, took charge of the life-or-death situation. He told other players to get the automated external defibrillator (AED), which the rink installed years ago.

Urrego gave Napholz chest compressions, then used the AED to revive him. It was the first time he used an AED.

This was the second time in a year the Oliver Urrego used CPR to save a life. In 2017 he and his wife performed CPR on his father-in-law who went into cardiac arrest in the couples home.

Source: Daily Herald