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Benefits of Using a Learning Management System (LMS)

1. Centralized content

Having all of your content in one place instead of spread across many different drives and devices makes for easier management and structure of the materials. By having everything in a centralized location, every member of your team can access the information. This ensures that every user sees the same content in the same manner.

2. Provides unlimited access to course materials

Once the content is loaded into your LMS, your employees have access to the information when it’s needed. They can access it when it is convenient for them and their work schedule.

3. Tracking and reporting

Utilizing an LMS gives you the ability to track your employees progress to ensure they are meeting their training and learning requirements. With an LMS you can access various reports and analytics to allow you to better focus on areas that may require more training or education. You also have the ability to make changes or updates to your course material at any time based on the feedback and results you receive through your LMS reports.

4. Material is easily updated

Unlike DVD’s or even on site instructors, having an LMS makes it easier to keep your material updated with the latest information or standards. Because everything is centralized, it is simple to make a change to the forms, requirements, specifications, or products as necessary. All users will receive the updated information at the same time.

5. An LMS grows with you

Having your LMS allows you to continually at content as your company grows and your business needs change. You simply login, make the necessary changes or add the new content. This will help you and your company stay ahead stay agile and grow and adapt more easily.

6. Compliance regulations

Keeping up with the various compliance regulations for your growing company can be daunting. That’s why having an LMS can be invaluable. Updating a traditional course with print outs, videos, or binders. Can be costly and time consuming. Using an LMS can give you the ability to add new compliance standards or make updates in a matter of minutes.

If you are interested in learning more about an LMS sytem for your company or have compliance training needs, contact Green Guard today.


CPR/First Aid Classes – Corporate and Group Classes April 30th – May 4th

CPR/First Aid – Corporate and Group Classes April 30th – May 4th

Green Guard offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, Green Guard’s CPR, AED and first aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2 year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

For more information;

Call 800-380-9119

 


Understanding eyewash stations and their requirements

Fendall Pureflow 1000
Fendall Pureflow 1000

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention states that each day about 2,000 U.S. worker have a job-related eye injury that requires medical treatment. Chemical burns to one or both eyes are common.

Many of these injuries can result in blindness. Proper safety equipment, such as eye protection and eyewash stations can save a worker’s eyesight.

OSHA on Compliance

The General Requirements in section 29 CFR (Code of Federal Regulations) 1910.151 states “…where the eyes or body of any person may be exposed to injurious corrosive materials, suitable facilities for quick drenching or flushing of the eyes and body shall be provided within the work area for immediate emergency use.”

American National Standards Institute

(ANSI) Standard Z358.1-2014 sets universal minimum performance and use requirements for all eyewash stations and drench shower equipment.

ANSI standard Z358.1-2014 says an eyewash station must:

  • Be accessible within a 10-second walk from the hazard
  • Be accessible without the need to walk up or down stairs, ladders, or cross any obstacles or roadways etc.
  • Deliver a 15-minute continuous flow of tepid fluid at 0.4 gallons per minute and be 60-100°F
  • Be located in areas where caustic or hazardous substances are present
  • Activate in one second or less and with one single motion
  • Be unobstructed
  • Be highly visible and identified with a sign

Where to place your emergency eyewash station

According to ANSI standards, the following areas must meet emergency eyewash compliance guidelines:

  • Painting and solvent operations
  • Battery charging stations
  • Tool parts washers
  • Laboratories
  • Hazardous chemical storage
  • Chemical pumping and/or mixing areas
  • Anywhere you use a chemical that has SDS eyewash requirements

If you need more information contact Green Guard today for a free consultation.


Woman who collapsed in Publix restroom saved with CPR

Renee Gold (Pictured left) and Kamilla Soares (right). Photo courtesy of myPalmBeachPost

Kamilla Soares, who recently became a paramedic was next door to Publix when she received an alert on her phone that someone needed CPR.

Kamilla, and a Publix Customer Service Manager Renee Gold performed life saving CPR.

Renee Gold found the woman in the bathroom stall.

“I had to pull her out from underneath. I had 911 on the phone, and they were telling me to check, ‘Was she breathing?’” Gold said. “She was gasping for air.”

Gold began doing CPR when Soares arrived. Together with the help of 9-1-1 dispatcher they performed CPR until Palm Beach Gardens Fire and Rescue arrived.

The woman was later released form the hospital.

”You guys definitely went above and beyond,” said Cory Bessette, Palm Beach Gardens Fire Rescue Division Chief of EMS. “Whether you’re medically trained or not, you can do CPR.”

Source: myPalmBeachPost


We all play a role in ending distracted driving


Cellphones are among the top reasons for being distracted while driving. We are so use to looking at our phones every time we hear the unmistakeable ding, or see that we have a new notification, that even when we are doing something as serious as operating a motor vehicle, we are compelled to see what just arrived in our inboxes.

Technology in vehicle is causing us to be more distracted than ever before. 53% of drivers believe that if manufactures put “infotainment” dashboard systems and hands-free technology in vehicles, they must be safe.1

While some states are implementing bans on the use of hand held devices, many drivers believe making the transitions to hands free voice assistants is the safe choice. In reality however, these technologies distract our brains even long after you’ve used them.

Make no mistake: This multitasking technology is about convenience, not safety.

#JustDrive

Source:NSC.org

  1. http://www.nsc.org/learn/NSC-Initiatives/Pages/distracted-driving.aspx

Pet first aid – For owners

With April being Pet First Aid Awareness month, below we list of a number of quick tips. This list is meant as intermediary steps. You should also consult a veterinarian.

Pet First Aid

Do you know what to do during a pet emergency? Here are some common emergency tips:

  • If your cat or dog is dehydrated, pull up on the skin between the shoulder blades. It should spring right back; if it stays tented this is a sign of dehydration.
  • Signs of pet poisoning include bleeding externally or internally, dilated pupils, drooling or foaming at the mouth, seizures or other abnormal mental state or behavior. If suspect your pet has been poisoned, contact Animal Poison Control 888-426-4435
  • Signs of heat stroke or heat exhaustion include collapse; body temperature of 104 degrees F or above; bloody diarrhea or vomiting; wobbliness; excessive panting or difficulty breathing; increase heart rate; mucous membranes very red; and increased salivation.
  • Pets bitten by other animals need vet attention to prevent the wound (even if minor) from becoming infected and to check for internal wounds. You should never break up a dogfight yourself because you could be bitten.
  • If your pet is bleeding, apply direct pressure using gauze over the bleeding site. If blood soaks through, apply more gauze (do not removed soaked gauze) until you can reach a veterinary hospital.
  • If your pet has a seizure, make sure it is in a safe place, but do not restrain the animal. Keep your hands away from its mouth as your pet may not know who you are during a seizure and could bite you.
  • Know where to go in case of an emergency. Your regular veterinarian is a great place if the emergency occurs during the day. If the emergency occurs in the evening or weekends it may be necessary to go to the emergency clinic in your area. Most are open 24 hours a day 7 days a week.
  • Ensure important phone numbers such as your veterinarian, emergency vet hospitals, or emergency contacts are easily accessible.
  • Pack a pet first aid kit. It is best if you can have one for her car, and one for at home use. Fill it not only with useful supplies, but also keep a copy of your pet’s medical records with your pets name, age, breed microchip number, vaccine history, and any pre-existing conditions.

This last point is especially helpful if you regularly use a pet sitter or babysitter and will ensure that this person will have all they need should an emergency arise.

 

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Starbucks barista performs CPR

Natasha Stapp, a barista at Starbucks stepped forward to perform CPR on a stranger when Chris Smith collapsed on the sidewalk out front of the store.

“One of the things that I love the most is being able to change somebody’s day,” Stapp said

Chris Smith suffered what is nicknamed the Widowmaker Heart Attack. It is a heart problem so deadly, that only about 5% of individuals with it survive. They Widowmaker is when 95% or more blockage occurs in the main artery that supplies the front wall of the heart. If left untreated, it causes the entire firing wall of the heart to die.

Thanks to Natasha’s actions and the help of the 9-1-1 operator, Chris Smith is alive to today.

“The details seem kind of homely, but my wife and I were able to celebrate a 52nd wedding anniversary and I watched two of our grandkids graduate. None of that would have happened if Natasha wouldn’t have been there. Without her CPR work, there wouldn’t have been anything for the paramedics to revive,” said Smith.

Source: Kens5


CPR Classes – Corporate and Group Classes April 23rd – 27th

CPR & First Aid – Corporate and Group Classes April 23rd – 27th

Green Guard offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, Green Guard’s CPR, AED and first aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2 year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

For more information;

Call 800-380-9119

 


Understanding the different types of hard hats

Har hats are designed to protect one of the most important parts of the human body. But did you know that there are different types and classes of hard hats. Make sure that you are using the right class of hard hat for the job.

The American National Standards Institute ANSI has put together a list to help ensure you have the right protection for the job.

ANSI Types of Hard Hats

According to ANSI Z89.1 all hard hats can be divided into two types. Type I and Type II.

  • Type I: Have a full brim around the entire hat. These are only mean to to protect workers from object blows that come from above and strike the top of the helmet.
  • Type II Have a short brim only in front. These hard hats are designed to offer protection from lateral blows and objects. This includes front and back, and side as well as top. These hard hats are also test for off-center penetration resistance and chin strap retention. Type II are the most commonly found hard hat in use.

ANSI Classes of Hard Hats

Hard Hats are also divided into classes to indicate how well they protect against shock.

  • Class E (Electrical) Can withstand up to 20,000 volts of electricity
  • Class G (General) Can withstand up to 2,200 colts of electricity
  • Class C (Conductive) These offer no protection from electric shock

Materials & Suspension

Most hard hats are made of non-conductive, high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and come equipped with a suspension that can be adjusted for a custom fit. Suspensions are available with 4, 6, or 8 load-bearing points and can be fitted using several different types of adjustments. The most common are pinlock, where the hard hat is removed and a pin is matched to a corresponding hole, and ratchet, which uses a knob to tighten or loosen the suspension’s fit around the head while wearing the hard hat.

Styles

When considering tasks and situations, hard hats are available in different styles. Cap hard hats have a short front brim that helps to shade the face from the sun and keeps rain away from the eyes. Some cap hard hats can also be worn backwards so the front brim is over the back of the neck. Full brim styles feature a brim that goes around the entire cap and shades the face, back of the neck, and ears. The full brim can also help to channel rain and snow away from the face and head.


Work Zone Safety: Everybody’s Responsibility

April 8th -12th is designated National Work Zone Awareness Week. This week is designed to bring attention to motorist and worker safety and mobility issues in work zones.

  • Over the last 5 years, 4,400 people have died and 200,000 injured in work zone crashes.
  • Drivers are the most frequent fatality in work zone crashes.
  • Most work zone fatalities involve working-age adults.
  • Rear-end crashes (running into the rear of a slowing or stopping vehicle) are the most common type of work zone crash.
  • Fatal work zone crashes occur most often in summer and fall.
  • The majority of fatal work zone crashes occurred on roads with speed limits greater than 50 mph.
  • Stopping distance for motor vehicles at 50 mph:

                   -Dry roadway300 ft

                   -Wet roadway400 ft

                   -Icy pavement1250 ft

  • A loaded 80,000 lb. tractor-trailer requires almost 50% more stopping distance.
  • It takes only an extra 25 seconds to cover 1 mile at 45 mph compared to 65 mph.

Tips for the Driver

  • Stay Alert and Minimize Distractions
  • Keep Your Headlights On
  • Pay Attention to the Road
  • Merge into the Proper Lane
  • Don’t Tailgate
  • Obey the Posted Speed Limit
  • Change Lanes Safely
  • Follow Instructions form Flaggers
  • Expect the Unexpected

BE PATIENT

Additional resources

FHWA-Developed Resources PDF

Trucking Safely Through Work Zones PDF

 

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