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4 Reasons Why ForkLift Checklists Are Critical

OSHA requires forklift trucks to be inspected at least once per day, or after every shift if in constant use

(Powered Industrial Truck OSHA Standard 29 CFR 1910.178(q)(7).

The inspection doesn’t have to be documented. However, there are four really good reasons why you should document the inspection:

 

 

Having a pre-printed checklist ensures that no safety critical parts of the forklift are missed

 

 

 

Ensures consistency across the organization, regardless of experience, every operator conducts the inspection, in the same way, inspecting the same components

 

 

Consistency allows comparisons between forklifts in your organization so that you can identify trends and patterns

 

 

Finally and crucially, it provides evidence to an OSHA inspector that you are complying with the standard

 

The operator should conduct a pre-start visual check with the key off and then perform an operational check with the engine running. The vehicle should only be placed in service if it passes this inspection. Any vehicle found to be defective in any way must be taken out of service immediately. Defects should be recorded and reported to a Supervisor.

The challenge that all safety professionals seem to have is to first make certain the operator performs the check, and then that the supervisors are engaged in managing it – either to say ‘good job’, or ask why the check has not been done. Green Guard working with SG World USA’s patented solution solves these problems and offers a visible and simple way to make certain forklift safety checks happen every shift.

In support of the OSHA standard, ANSI Standard B56 requires “adequate maintenance facilities, personnel and procedures to be provided” when operating forklift trucks. Having an inspection program would be an important part of meeting this standard too.

 

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Y employees use AED to save life

Critical seconds tick away. Training takes over. Josh Eckstein, a lifeguard at the Southeastern Indiana YMCA, knew what to do while on duty one morning in late July when he saw a Y member start to go under the water, says marketing coordinator Kathleen Bohman.

He immediately put the YMCA emergency protocols into action, pulling the member out of the water to perform CPR while Connie Fledderman, Welcome Center staff member, called EMS and came to assist Eckstein with the automated external defibrillator.

More than 350,000 cardiac arrests happen outside of hospitals each year, and 90 percent of Americans who experience out-of-hospital cardiac arrests die. However, the American Heart Association estimates that properly administered CPR can triple a person’s odds of survival. Sadly, only 46 percent of cardiac arrest victims get CPR from a bystander.

“I had no idea what was in store for me as I swam my regular laps that day,” recalls the Y member. “My heart stopped beating. Had this happened to me anywhere other than the Y, I may not be here to be able to talk about my good outcome.”

Y executive director Angie Harmeyer says, “In addition to our lifeguards being certified by the American Red Cross, we require all YMCA staff to be first aid/CPR/AED trained within the first 30 days of employment, followed by regular recertifications and in-service trainings. Providing a safe environment for our members and guests is everyone’s job. That also means being prepared.”

Why is CPR/AED training important?

  1) By performing simple procedures and following certain guidelines, it may be possible to save lives by giving basic treatment until professional medical help arrives.

 2) In an emergency, there’s no time to read instructions.

3) If you’ve memorized some of the basic procedures, it will help you react quickly and efficiently.

4) It can make the difference from complete recovery and permanent disability.

5) It can help save a life.

“Josh and Connie showed exactly why we put such an emphasis on CPR training for all city employees, companies and the general public who are eager to be certified,” said Batesville Fire Chief Todd Schutte. “Through their immediate response and actions, the patient survived the incident and is on the road to a full recovery.”

 

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Source: https://www.batesvilleheraldtribune.com/news/local_news/y-employees-use-aed-to-save-life/article_0d8867d8-c376-11e9-a09b-37d70bfea96b.html


How To Maintain & Clean Your Emergency Eyewash Stations

Emergency Eyewash Station Maintenance

In this guide, we’ll walk you through some best practices on how to keep your eyewash units in tip-top condition, so that you can rest assured that they’ll be ready for action should the unthinkable happen.

Why is maintenance so important?

Eyewash stations are of critical importance in any workplace that works with hazardous, corrosive substances. Using an eyewash in an emergency situation can help prevent scarring, permanent injury and blindness.

Improper maintenance can lead to a number of hazards, which we’ve detailed below.

Infections

Bacteria, amoeba and other disease-causing organisms thrive in stagnant water. If an eyewash station is not regularly flushed and activated for testing purposes, the water within the system will begin to harbor organisms such as legionella, pseudomonas and acanthamoeba, which, if propelled into the eyes, can cause nasty infections such as conjunctivitis.

If the user’s eyes have been damaged (which, after all, is probably the reason they’d be using an eyewash unit in the first place), the risk of infection is even greater.

Corrosion

Over time, iron-containing metals that come into contact with water are liable to oxidize, or rust. Not only can this lead to contamination of the water used in the eyewash station, but it can also cause damage to the unit itself.

Corrosion can cause holes in the pipes supplying the eyewash unit, resulting in leaks, which can cause the eyewash to discharge water at an insufficient pressure, diminishing its ability to properly flush out the eyes of the user.

image of How To Maintain & Clean Your Emergency Eyewash Stations

Blockages

Occasionally, dust, dirt and foreign objects can build up within an eyewash station, especially if it is not operated for a long period of time. This debris can lead to contamination and cause blockages in the pipework.

Blockages can impede the flow of water to the unit, or conversely increase the pressure, sometimes even to levels that can harm the user’s eyes.

Testing

The ANSI regulations, as well as the various other bodies of guidance that pertain to emergency eyewash stations, state that units must be regularly tested, and for good reason.

Regular testing doesn’t just ensure that the unit is functioning correctly – it also helps prevent the water within the unit from sitting and becoming stagnant and helps flush any collected debris through the pipes.

Aside from the weekly functional testing mandated by the ANSI regulations, it is advisable to perform a weekly visual inspection of all eyewash units to ensure that they are free from detritus and in a good state of cleanliness.

The water stored in portable eyewash stations should be changed at least every 120 days. The water should also be treated with water preservative to help keep microbes at bay. Water preservative comes supplied with all of our portable eyewash units.

Cleaning

As with any item of safety equipment, it is crucial that eyewash stations are kept clean and sanitary. This will prevent the buildup of harmful, infection-causing microbes.

When cleaning an eyewash station, use a simple solution of household detergent and hot water. Apply the solution to the unit with a soft sponge or cloth before rinsing thoroughly, making sure to sluice away any remaining soap residue.

Did You Know?

Green Guard First Aid offers onsite services to help you meet and maintain compliance for your Eye Wash Station, First Aid cabinet, AED and many other safety-related items?

 

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Source: https://www.safety-eyewash.co.uk/content/eyewash-maintenance-guide


Attorneys: Lockout/tag-out violations are costly OSHA violations

Columbus, Ohio — OSHA is hitting hard at the issue of lockout/tag-out and machine safety guarding and putting a laser focus on amputations that could result from failure to disconnect all energy before servicing and maintenance of industrial machines.

That was the message from two lawyers who spoke at the Environmental Health and Safety Summit.

“When do most often amputations occur? When someone forgot to lockout/tag-out and when there’s a lack of a guard. That’s when you’re going to see an amputation,” said Nelva Smith, of the Steptoe & Johnson law firm.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration revised its reporting rule on Jan. 1, 2015, so employers now must report within 24 hours any amputation injury, even if there is no loss of bone, as well as eye injuries and all in-patient hospitalizations. OSHA kept its ongoing rule that fatalities must be reported within eight hours.

Smith said OSHA is increasing fines every year for amputations.

“Now you can go up to $139,000 for a maximum for a willful and a repeat [violations],” she said. “So you can easily get one citation for $139,000. Imagine if you got five citations? How much is that? Over a half-million dollars. And again, there’s a pattern. They’re really hitting the lockout/tag-out and machine guarding.”

Plastics machinery, such as injection molding machinery, can cause serious injuries from pinching and crushing, especially in the mold clamping area.

“It’s to prevent serious injury or death. You should be aware of the standard and what your requirements are under the standard,” Smith said.

OSHA defines “amputation” broadly and is stricter than workers’ compensation, according to William Wahoff, a lawyer at the firm. “If it is the tip of the finger without any bone damaged, you still have to report it for OSHA.”

And Wahoff said amputations are likely to lead to OSHA inspections: 65 percent of reported amputations resulted in inspections, compared with in-patient hospitalizations, which lead to inspections in around 35-40 percent of the cases.

Smith and Wahoff gave an hour-long presentation about lockout/tag-out and machine guarding during the health and safety conference, held July 18-19 in Columbus. Both lawyers are based in Columbus.

OSHA uses the term “control of hazardous energy,” for what’s commonly called lockout/tag-out, Smith said, covering sources of energy such as electrical, mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, chemical and thermal.

“Why do we need to do it? Because during the servicing and maintenance of these machines and equipment, that’s where the injuries do occur, more often than not,” Smith said. “The unexpected startup or release of stored energy will usually result in a serious injury or death. Usually these are very complicated big machines, with a lot of working parts, a lot of sharp edges and pinch-points and that sort of thing. And if you’ve got a maintenance person working on a machine and a fellow employee doesn’t know it’s not locked out and just says, ‘Oh, I’m gonna hit the start button; I don’t see anybody.’ This is where it happens.”

Smith and Wahoff said manufacturers must have an energy control program and specific procedures for each machine. They recommend posting the step-by-step procedure for lockout/tag-out right on the machine, making it visible for employees and OSHA inspectors. OSHA will ask about the hazardous energy policy, even if they are on-site for another type of complaint, the lawyers said.

Wahoff said that companies train plant employees and maintenance staff; they should use OSHA’s hazardous energy control terminology, at least part of the time, so they know the right wording when an inspector questions the workers.

Smith added that the person who puts the lock tag on the machine must be the one who takes it off when the work is completed.

What about during “normal production”? Smith said that is not covered by lockout/tag-out.

“The problem we run into is, can we argue certain things are normal production and I don’t have to lockout/tag-out, because it can be a very complicated procedure to disconnect all of the sources of energy,” she said. Minor tool changes and adjustments and other minor servicing activities are OK, “if it’s routine, it’s repetitive and integral to the use of the machine, and you use alternative measures to protect that employee,” Smith said.

But Wahoff said OSHA does not consider the setup of dies to be “normal operation.”

Smith laid out the way to think about it: “If you want to make an exception to the lockout/tag-out procedure, am I putting an employee in a zone of danger? Are they having to put themselves in a machine? Are we having to bypass a guard? Is that really ‘normal production’?”

 


Man makes ‘miracle’ recovery from heart attack after strangers perform CPR

On July 23, building contractor Brian Boos, JDW, Inc. service repair supervisor Darren Ebaugh and FerrelGas technician Shawn Kainz were all called to a home in rural Oak Creek to fix a family’s furnace. The three men say they have crossed paths on job sites before but were essentially strangers. They didn’t even know each other’s names.

“Everything was meant to be. It was one of those days. One of those moments that everything was meant to be,” Boos told FOX31.

Upon arriving to the job site, Kainz began complaining of chest pains. He told Boos and Ebaugh that he planned to see a doctor after finishing the work on the furnace regulator.

“I felt like I had heartburn. That’s all I remember,” Kainz said.

Ebaugh was putting his tools in his truck while Boos and Kainz stood together outside the home. That’s when Kainz collapsed.

“He didn’t grab his chest. He didn’t say, ‘Oh no.’ He just turned and [fell],” Boos said.

Boos attempted to call 911 and despite having an extremely weak signal in the rural area, he was able to connect with emergency dispatch. They helped talk Ebaugh and Boos through nearly 15 minutes of CPR until paramedics arrived.

“Just looking at his eyes, his eyes were glazed over. From being a hunter, I’ve seen it a lot and I knew what it meant. He was gone,” Ebaugh said.

“For sure there was no life,” Boos said.

The two never stopped CPR.

“The bystander CPR saved him. They kept him alive until we could get here,” Oak Creek Fire EMS supervisor Angela Bracegirdle told FOX31.

She has been with the department for 19 years. In that time, she says often bystanders will give up on CPR after about two minutes, if they even step in to help at all.

“Just keep going. Don’t stop. Because you never know,” Bracegirdle said.

Bracegirdle and her team were able to get Kainz’s heart restarted and he began breathing on his own before he was loaded into an ambulance. On the way to the hospital, she says he went into cardiac arrest again and regained a pulse after they used an AED (automatic electronic defibrillator) on him.

“It was a widow maker,” Kainz told FOX31. “It was 100-percent clogged coronary artery on the top right.”

He spent less than a week in the hospital before being released. He is now recovering and those around him say his progress is a miracle.

“Monday, [I got] the call, ‘He wants to have dinner with you.’ It just blew me away. I never would have imaged he survived,” Ebaugh said.

“It doesn’t look like he has a dent on his bumper. He looks like a million bucks. It’s a miracle,” Boos said.

“Yes, it is. It is. In my 19 years, I’ve only seen two walk out of the hospital,” Bracegirdle said.

Oak Creek Fire Chief Chuck Wisecup says in his 36-year career, this is the first time he has seen someone survive CPR.

“I think everyone needs to learn CPR,” Kainz said. “I think it’ll be a big awareness for everybody to learn CPR.”

Boos had taken a CPR class seven years prior. Ebaugh hadn’t taken one since he was in high school 25 years ago. They both say they now plan to be re-certified on a yearly basis.

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Can You Find The Defibrillator At Work?

About 10,000 cardiac arrests happen in workplaces each year, according to the American Heart Association. Using an automatic external defibrillator can increase the chance of survival.

Do you know where your workplace’s automated external defibrillator is located? About half of all U.S. employees don’t, according to the results of an American Heart Association survey.

The survey also found that workers in the hospitality and service industry, which includes hotels and restaurants, were less likely to know the location of their workplace’s AED. About 66 percent of them didn’t know where it was. Workers in schools and other education facilities were the most likely to be able to find it: About 61 percent said they knew the AED’s location.

However, the survey didn’t follow up and ask whether the workplace had an AED, and also didn’t try to distinguish between who didn’t know where the AED was and those who didn’t know if there was an AED on site. That makes the findings less clear.

For every minute that you’re in cardiac arrest, you’re pulseless, your [chance of ] survival drops by 10 percent

An AED checks the heart’s rhythm and can send an electric shock to the heart to try to restore a normal rhythm.

More than 350,000 cardiac arrests take place in the U.S. in locations other than hospitals each year, according to the American Heart Association. In 2015, Nancy Holland, a resident of Leawood, Kan., became one of them.

She went into cardiac arrest in the restroom of a restaurant where she had been eating dinner with her husband. The restaurant’s manager performed CPR until paramedics arrived with an AED.

Holland says she’s lucky the restaurant’s manager knew CPR, because it kept her “salvageable” until the paramedics showed up. When he started working as a restaurant manager, she says, his mom had told him he owed it to the customers to learn CPR — just in case.

Now whenever she walks into a building, she scans the walls looking for an AED.

“I hope I never need it, but it’s always in the back of my mind,” Holland says.

She also gives talks about the importance of CPR and AED training, emphasizing that cardiac arrest can happen to anyone.

Holland was in her 40s and didn’t have any health problems when she went into cardiac arrest. She had been to her doctor for a checkup just three weeks earlier.

And she’s now a board member of her local chapter of the HeartSafe Foundation, which provides free training in hands-only CPR and works to improve public access to AEDs.

She also says businesses should take precautions before an emergency happens.

About 10,000 cardiac arrests happen in workplaces each year, the AHA says.

More than half of employees — about 55 percent — aren’t offered first aid or CPR/AED training through their employer, the American Heart Association survey found. And sometimes employees have access to only one form of training.

But most of the 2,000 employees surveyed say their employers should offer first aid and CPR/AED training. Ninety percent say they would participate in training if their employers provided them.

Cost and fear of liability are two reasons that businesses don’t install AEDs.

A typical AED costs about $1,200 to $1,500 and prices have gone down over time as the technology becomes more widespread. Machines that once cost $3,000 now run under $1,000, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures, which tracks the passage of laws related to AEDs.

When it comes to legal liability if an AED is used improperly and someone is injured or killed, in most states you’re protected by law.

In addition, AEDs have a built-in mechanism for analyzing heart rhythms and evaluating whether a shock is needed.

But AEDs do need to be maintained in order to be effective. Batteries should be replaced every two to five years, depending on the model. And the sticky pads that adhere to a cardiac arrest victim’s skin also come with expiration dates and need to be replaced about every two to three years.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration doesn’t require workplaces to have AEDs, but it does encourage employers to have them on-site.

Click here to learn more about choosing the right AED for your business

 

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Sources: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/06/19/533269211/can-you-find-the-defibrillator-at-work-half-of-people-say-no

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“Second chance at life:” Daughter uses CPR to save life of father in cardiac arrest

A 26-year-old lifeguard trained in CPR saved her father’s life

A 59-year-old Town of Farmington man was hosting a family gathering at his Green Lake home on Friday when he became unresponsive.

The man had no prior cardiac history.

His stepdaughter recognized the signs of cardiac distress and started CPR.

“The early intervention of CPR by the stepdaughter provided the critical time needed to get first responders on scene with the AED. Thanks to her, this man has a second chance at life.” Washington County Sheriff Martin Schulteis said. “Stories like this clearly demonstrate the importance for everyone to know basic CPR. One day you may need it to save a loved one, just as this stepdaughter did.”

The man regained consciousness before he was transported to the hospital.

The family said the man has recovered and is set to be released today.

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Source:https://www.cbs58.com/news/second-chance-at-life-daughter-uses-cpr-to-save-life-of-father-in-cardiac-arrest


‘Couldn’t let him go:’ Washington County woman saved stepfather’s life with CPR

A Washington County woman jumped into action to save her stepfather’s life. The 26-year-old performed CPR until first responders arrived to help.

 

“I mean, it was crazy,” said Rachel Nelson. “You sort of have to block the chaos out and focus on the job at hand.”

Nelson and her stepfather, Curt Vorpahl, were hanging out with family on Friday, July 19.

“We thought it was going to be a great day to be out on the lake,” said Vorpahl.

Rachel Nelson, Curt Vorpahl

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The family was gathered when Vorpahl suddenly went into cardiac arrest.

“The last thing I remember was thinking how warm it was for it starting to become the evening,” said Vorpahl. Vorpahl’s pulse faded away, and Nelson quickly reacted.

“I started immediately with compressions, followed by rescue breaths. I continued that for five minutes or so,” said Nelson. It involved five minutes of intense focus.

“I was thinking of my family the whole time, how I couldn’t let him go. I didn’t want to let my family down,” said Nelson.

A first responder was nearby, providing a pocket mask and AED.

“He was shocked by the AED,” said Nelson. Vorpahl made it to the hospital.

“I still don’t believe it,” Vorpahl said. “It’s like it never happened.”

Hearing how many people fought for his life brought Vorpahl immense gratitude and emotion. “Every second count’s in a situation like this,” said Nelson.

Nelson learned CPR as a teenage lifeguard. Over the years, she renewed her certification and urged everyone to get theirs. The family was working with neighbors to hopefully put together a CPR course so more people can learn the life-saving skill.

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Source: https://fox6now.com/2019/07/24/couldnt-let-him-go-washington-county-woman-saved-stepfathers-life-with-cpr/


5 Forklift Safety Elements – Part 5 “Know About Load Basics”

Forklift Safety Elements – Know About Load Basics

OSHA advises operators to check loads before picking them up with the forks, ensuring the load’s stability and dimensions will allow for safe transport. Move squarely in front of the load and move the forks apart as far as possible before driving them under the load. Make sure to not overload and that the load is centered.

Slightly tilt the forklift mast backward before lifting. Lift the load enough to clear the floor or rack. For stacking, OSHA recommends lifting the load above the lower stack by about 10 centimeters, or 4 inches.

When placing a load, operators should be squarely in front of the placement destination.  Make sure the area is flat and stable, and don’t place heavy loads on top of light ones. Lower the forks upon placing the load, and then back the forklift away. As always, ensure the load is stable.

 

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Source:https://www.safetyandhealthmagazine.com/articles/16138-elements-of-forklift-safety


5 Forklift Safety Elements – Part 4 “Understand The Stability Triangle”

Understand the ‘stability triangle’

An unloaded lift truck’s center of gravity – where the weight has equal concentration – typically is higher than that of a personal vehicle. The load has its own center of gravity, and once it’s picked up, a combined center of gravity between the load and truck is established.

Lift trucks are built on three-point suspension systems, the physics of which resemble a triangle. Support points lie at both ends of the front axle, with another located at the center of the rear axle. Together, this forms a “stability triangle” that operators must stay within when the truck is in motion.

Numerous factors can cause a lift truck to vacate the stability triangle, including unstable, heavy, wide or raised loads; fast starts and stops; taking corners too quickly; and rough terrain.

Here are several tips to help prevent forklifts from tipping over:

  • Before operation, ensure a load is completely stable and secured on the forks.
  • Keep loads low to the ground during operation.
  • Keep loads uphill when climbing or descending an incline.
  • Drive slowly in wet or slippery conditions.
  • Slow down during turns, and honk the horn upon encountering traffic.

Stay tuned for Part – 5 ” Know about load basics” coming next week.

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Source:https://www.safetyandhealthmagazine.com/articles/16138-elements-of-forklift-safety