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First responders save man after 45 minutes of CPR

Shabiah Gordon’s near-death experience began in the early morning hours of February 24, when his wife Rosa Gordon noticed that her 39-year-old husband’s breathing was not normal.

Rosa tried unsuccessfully to wake up her husband, who had not had any health issues previously.

She called 911, and first responders arrived and sprang into action to help the father of four, who was in cardiac and respiratory arrest.

That’s when the determined paramedics performed CPR for 45 minutes, determined to get a pulse.

Officials say after two weeks in the intensive care unit, Gordon was able to walk out of the hospital, regaining full neurological function.

First responders from both teams include Office of EMS EMT Nicholas Gammello and Paramedic Jacob Gault; Clermont Fire Department Engine 101 team Firefighter/EMT Bruce Mace, Firefighter/EMT Jordan Bennett, Engineer/Paramedic Blake McCorkle, Lieutenant/EMT Jason Ness.

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Source: http://www.fox35orlando.com/home/first-responders-save-man-after-45-minutes-of-cpr


5 Forklift Safety Elements – Part 2 (Performing Inspections)

5 elements of forklift safety – Part 2

Performing checkups

Operators are urged to inspect forklifts before each job, checking first the items that can be monitored without the engine running. Checkpoints should include seat belts, tires, lights, horn, brakes, backup alarms and fluid levels, as well as the moving and load-supporting parts of the forklift.

Kertzman said his agency commonly issues citations to companies that neglect to maintain forklifts in good working condition.

“It’s low-hanging fruit to have a beat-up truck sitting out there that any inspector can spot half a dozen things wrong with it from 40 feet away,” Kertzman said.

The Washington L&I citation process involves discussing the area(s) of code violation, explaining to the employer how the organization failed to comply and offering possible methods to resolve the issue.

“Then the employer is ultimately on the hook to decide what they’re going to do, and then make those changes in a timely fashion,” Kertzman said.

 

When to Perform Inspections

Whether it’s in a warehouse or outside, there are a few precautions you must take before you actually operate the lift. Your pre-shift checklist is one of the most important things you learn about during forklift safety training. Here is what these inspections entail.

When you go through forklift safety training, you’re taught that forklift safety inspections should be performed before every single shift. This does not mean that one safety inspection per day is all that is required. If there are multiple shifts per day, each operator must perform an inspection before their shift begins. This ensures the safety of the operator and everyone working in the space around them. These pre-shift checks can also help to prevent warehouse accidents that may damage goods or products. There are two types of pre-shift checks that must be done: a visual check and an operational pre-use check.

forklift training nj

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Visual Check

The visual check is to be done before you start the forklift. During this check, you are going over the general condition of the forklift:

  • Tires: Check tires for any noticeable damages like cuts or gouges. Ensure the tire pressure is at the optimum level for pneumatic tires.
  • Fluid Levels: Make sure that all fluid levels including oil, fuel, or water are where they need to be.
  • Battery: Ensure the battery is fully charged. Check for exposed wires or loose cable connectors.
  • Forks and Mast: Check for any physical damage to the forks or mast of the forklift including bends or cracks.
  • Seatbelt: Every sit-down forklift needs a seatbelt. Make sure it is working and there are no rips or tears.

Operational Pre-Use Check

The operational pre-use check is to be conducted when you turn the forklift on, before operating the lift. This check should include:

  • Lights: Ensure that both the headlights and warning lights are operational.
  • Horn: Test the horn to make sure it is loud and clear.
  • Hydraulic Hoses: Check to make sure they are secured.
  • Hour Meter & Gauges: Check to see if meters and gauges are working correctly.
  • Brakes: Check the breaks to ensure they stop the lift smoothly. Test the parking brake to see if it can hold against a slight acceleration. Double check the handbrake to make sure it is operational.
  • Hydraulic Controls: Ensure both the lift mechanism and tilt mechanism are operating smoothly by raising the forks all the way up and all the way back down, as well as tilting the mast all the way forward and then back again.
  • Steering: Turn the wheel to the left and to the right, making sure the wheels of the lift respond correctly.
  • Unusual Noises: Listen for abnormal sounds coming from the forklift.

If any issues are found during these pre-shift checks, they must be reported and the forklift in question must be taken out of commission until the issues are resolved.

forklift training near me

Workplace Check

Before you start operating the lift truck, you should always do a workplace check as well. A workplace inspection ensures that your work environment is clear of any obstructions and safe for operation. During this check, you should keep these things in mind:

  • Ground Conditions: Make sure you’re aware of the ground conditions in the warehouse. Look out for any slopes, spills that cause the floor to be slippery, or ledges that could get in the way of the lift or cause it to tip over.
  • Overhead Obstructions: Ensure that there are no overhead obstructions low enough to impede the forklift or the load being carried.
  • Personnel: Be aware of how many people are currently working in the warehouse and know where they are at all times while operating the lift.
  • Machinery: Always be aware of other forklifts operating in the same space or any other machinery that is being used during your shift.

Forklift Safety Training for Your Business

OSHA requires that these safety checks be conducted on every forklift before every single shift. These checks ensure the safety of the operators and those working around them. OSHA can and will request proof of inspections for up to four years prior. Because of this, it is recommended that you keep a good record of inspection sheets along with any corresponding repairs that were made. This way OSHA and insurance companies will know repairs were made as soon as a machine broke down. For forklifts that do not pass these inspections for any reason, it is crucial that repairs are done as soon as possible. Every company that uses forklifts in its daily operations needs to have an official checklist policy to ensure consistency and safety at all times.

 

Stay tuned for Part – 3 “Know the machinery and the rules” coming next week.

 

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Source: https://www.safetyandhealthmagazine.com/articles/16138-elements-of-forklift-safety

Source: https://cnclifttruck.com/forklift-safety-training-inspections/


Proper Disposal of Razor Blades in the Workplace

Razor blades are an essential part of many everyday business tasks. One of the crucial aspects of using them is to make sure that they are properly disposed of after they have become dull.

Razor blades are an essential part of many everyday business tasks. One of the crucial aspects of using them is to make sure that they are properly disposed of after they have become dull.

Hazards

Razor blades that are disposed of incorrectly can cause numerous hazards in the workplace. If they are left laying around, people can get stuck or stabbed by them, causing injury. Janitors and other maintenance personnel that collect garbage bags can be hurt by blades thrown into a trash can. These injuries can be prevented by putting used razor blades in the correct receptacle designed for the disposal of sharp items. Razor blades should be re-covered before disposal. Companies should begin by assessing when, how and where the blades are used and then outline disposal procedures.

 

Sharps Containers

Sharps containers are specially designed to hold needles, razor blades and other sharp objects that can expose others to injury or biohazards. These containers should be located near areas where such objects are commonly used. The boxes should also be within easy reach and readily recognizable to workers. Some sharps containers do not have to be emptied but have lids that self-lock when closed. The entire container can be disposed of as a whole but must be done according to federal guidelines.

Disposal

Sharps containers for the disposal of razor blades have to be sent to a facility to be emptied and returned sanitized. These containers should be closely watched so that they are changed out before they spill over, which can create hazards to workers. Setting up a monitoring schedule and ensuring that employees know the procedures for disposing of razor blades properly will help to make the workplace a safer environment.

Green Guard offers a complete Sharps Waste System mail back program with everything required to properly and safely package and dispose of your sharps waste.

 

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Source: https://homesteady.com/way-5745645-workplace-proper-disposal-razor-blades.html


Are You Ready to Save a Life? – CPR Classes Available Now

CPR/First Aid Training – Corporate and Group Classes

Green Guard offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, Green Guard’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Looking for a Team Building opportunity? Learn to save a life while providing a great team building exercise.

 

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Starbucks is installing needle-disposal boxes in locations across America

Starbucks’ efforts to address opioid use and improperly disposed needles in its bathrooms are expanding.

Starbucks stores in at least 25 US markets have installed needle-disposal boxes in bathrooms in recent months. By this summer, the chain aims to have installed sharps boxes in bathrooms in all regions where such action has been deemed necessary.

The coffee giant also allows local district managers or store managers to put in requests to have sharps-disposal boxes installed in their locations’ bathrooms.

“We are always working and listening to our partners on ways we can better support them when it comes to issues like these,” Reggie Borges, a Starbucks representative, said in an email to Business Insider.

Starbucks has been testing solutions in recent months as workers’ safety concerns have mounted, with thousands of employees signing a petition calling for Starbucks to place needle-disposal boxes in high-risk bathrooms.

The company also faced at least one government investigation related to the issue in 2018 after two employees in a Eugene, Oregon, location were stuck with hypodermic needles within a month of each other, according to Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) documents obtained by Business Insider through a Freedom of Information Act request.

“I think the biggest and boldest move that Starbucks leaders can do right now is to step aside from the potential political problems behind needle-disposal boxes in restrooms and give it a nationwide launch,” one Seattle Starbucks worker whose location recently installed boxes in bathrooms told Business Insider.

“We have had zero toilet clogs and zero needles found in an unsafe place since we had them installed last month,” the worker said. “It’s been really wonderful.”

Six Starbucks employees who spoke with Business Insider asked to remain anonymous in order to speak frankly.

‘It is a scary situation’

starbucks needle

An uncapped needle that a Starbucks worker said she found in the trash in December 2018.

According to the Seattle Starbucks worker and other employees at the coffee giant who have worked in urban locations, encountering syringes on the job is often a fact of life.

“They generally appear in bathrooms, either wrapped up in paper towels or lurking at the surface of the garbage,” the Seattle employee said. “We are responsible for removing them from public spaces and placing them in a sharps-disposal kit, always with gloves if not with tongs. Less often, they are poking out of the bottom of the bag when changing.”

While messy bathrooms and drug use can create an uncomfortable work environment, most employees’ top fear is an accidental needle prick. Being stuck by a hypodermic needle means risking exposure to HIV and hepatitis, and it requires workers to immediately visit a hospital or urgent-care unit for testing and treatment.

“It is a scary situation to see because we don’t have needle-proof gloves and the only protection we have against any sharp objects is ‘double bagging’ a trash can with two bags instead of one, which is a ridiculous thing to actually think two plastic bags can stop a sharp needle,” said a Nashville, Tennessee, Starbucks employee who has worked at the chain for more than a decade.

Starbucks provides training for employees on how to safely deal with hypodermic needles, including instructions for how to safely dispose of garbage and what to do in case of a needle-prick injury. Sharps kits have long been available in Starbucks locations — albeit not installed in bathrooms — as stores have the option to order a sharps kit along with their first-aid kits.

According to Starbucks, any employee who feels unsafe performing a task is encouraged to speak with his or her manager and will not be made to perform the action.

“These societal issues affect us all and can sometimes place our [employees] in scary situations, which is why we have protocols and resources in place to ensure our partners are out of harm’s way,” Borges told Business Insider.

While Starbucks has established safety procedures, government documents and conversations with workers revealed that Starbucks has recently been forced to find new solutions in response to employees’ growing concerns about needle-stick injuries on the job.

A 2018 OSHA investigation sparked change

OSHA

Images of a needle-prick injury and a needle popping out of a bag in Oregon OSHA filings.

 

In October 2018, the Oregon OSHA opened an investigation into a Eugene, Oregon, Starbucks location after an employee filed a complaint with the administration. Two employees had recently been stuck by hypodermic needles at the store, the OSHA investigation confirmed.

Worry over needle sticks had reached such intensity at the Eugene Starbucks that a second employee filed a complaint after the Oregon OSHA had already begun investigating the situation.

“The manager confirmed two employees had received needlestick injuries within the last month from hypodermic needles left uncapped in the bathroom, and stated needles and blood had been found in the bathroom at this location for over a year, but the frequency of needles being left in the bathrooms had increased significantly in recent months,” the Oregon OSHA inspection narrative said.

All employees at the Eugene, Oregon, store were required to sign a form to acknowledge that they had completed a sharps-exposure-prevention training.

“During interviews, employees expressed frustration that a sharps container was not in the bathrooms for guests to use,” the OSHA inspection narrative added.

“Employees who received a sharps injury stated that they had not been contacted by anyone from Starbucks’ corporate office regarding their injuries,” the OSHA inspection narrative said.

Starbucks was penalized $3,100 in the investigation, according to documents viewed by Business Insider, with the Oregon OSHA issuing fines for five violations in January 2019.

Among these fines was a $700 penalty for not providing containers for sharps in or near bathrooms where contaminated sharps were commonly found. Other violations included not making the hepatitis B vaccine available to all workers who might be exposed to the disease through needle pricks, insufficient training, and exposure-control programs, and not having a properly functioning safety committee as required by Oregon law.

Starbucks made a number of changes at the location, according to OSHA documents filed by the coffee shop’s manager of risk control in January.

The location removed fixtures in the bathroom, including large trash cans, diaper-changing stations, paper-towel dispensers, and toilet-seat-liner holders, and it moved a portable sharps container closer to the area where sharps had been found. According to the letter of corrective action, there have not been any needles found in the location’s bathrooms since it made the changes.

Starbucks also updated its training processes and an exposure-control plan related to blood-borne pathogens.

Starbucks declined to comment further on the OSHA investigation.

How needle-disposal boxes and sharps kits protect workers

cinta sharps

Green Guard provides organizations with various sharps disposal programs including safe disposal of knife blades used in shipping departments.

 

The opioid crisis is affecting restaurants, retailers, and other organizations with public bathrooms across the US.

In a study led by Brett Wolfson-Stofko for New York University’s Center for Drug Use and HIV Research, 58% of the 86 New York City business managers surveyed said they had encountered drug use in their businesses’ bathrooms. Another Center for Drug Use and HIV Research study of 15 service-industry workers found that a significant majority had encountered drug use, syringes, or both in bathrooms while on the job.

Wolfson-Stofko told Business Insider in January that employees he interviewed expressed concerns about being pricked by needles or having customers injure themselves. People who are inadvertently pricked by needles often pay hundreds of dollars out-of-pocket for emergency-room visits, tests, and medication.

“They’re concerned about their health,” Wolfson-Stofko said of the workers surveyed. “They’re concerned about their customers’ health.”

Installing sharps containers is one of the first things that businesses can do to help workers avoid contact with improperly discarded syringes, according to Wolfson-Stofko. He also suggested that companies looking for ways to support in-store workers could provide training on how to deal with overdosing customers and support the installation of supervised injection facilities in their communities.

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Source: https://www.businessinsider.com/starbucks-needle-disposal-boxes-more-locations-2019-4


Why are you waiting? Sign up your team for CPR certification.

CPR/First Aid Training – Corporate and Group Classes

Green Guard offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, Green Guard’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

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5 Forklift Safety Elements – Part 1

5 elements of forklift safety – Part 1

Train for safety

OSHA estimates that 35,000 serious injuries and 62,000 non-serious injuries involving forklifts occur annually. Further, data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that 96 U.S. workers were killed in incidents involving forklifts in 2015.

A safety guide published by the Washington State Department of Labor & Industries states that workers without proper training and knowledge of forklift operation, as well as operators who maneuver forklifts carelessly, have an increased risk of injury or death.

A commitment to safety begins with proper training. The guide further states that “an untrained forklift operator can be as dangerous as an unlicensed driver of a motor vehicle.” OSHA’s Powered Industrial Trucks Standard – 29 CFR 1910.178 – establishes that “the employer shall ensure that each powered industrial truck operator is competent to operate a powered industrial truck safely, as demonstrated by the successful completion of the training and evaluation” outlined in the standard.

OSHA requires training programs to combine formal instruction, such as lectures and written material, with practical training and a workplace performance evaluation. Washington L&I Safety and Health Technical Specialist Drew Kertzman said that a prevalence of qualified experts and resources has allowed for improved training in recent years. Still, operators should be mindful of the differences between various types and models of forklifts and lift trucks.

“The gap that I’ve seen in the past is just presuming that once you’re trained on one forklift, you automatically know how to maneuver all forklifts,” Kertzman said. “As you get larger and larger (forklifts), they operate differently, and as you go from model to model, they are a little bit different.”

 

Stay tuned for next weeks Part – 2 “Perform Checkups”

 

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Source: https://www.safetyandhealthmagazine.com/articles/16138-elements-of-forklift-safety

 


4 Simple Steps to Use a Fire Extinguisher At Work

Using a fire extinguisher in the workplace

According to OSHA, the most common emergency small businesses must plan for is a fire. Fire extinguishers can be invaluable tools to help fight smaller fires in the workplace or to protect evacuation routes in the event of a larger one.

OSHA requires employers to thoroughly train workers not only how to use an extinguisher properly, but also how to accurately assess a situation and determine when evacuation is the safest course of action. OSHA requires employees to be trained in fire extinguisher use on an annual basis, at a minimum.

A simple 4 step fire extinguisher training technique to use with employees is the PASS method:

      Pull the pin on the extinguisher

     Aim the hose nozzle low toward the base of the fire

     Squeeze the handle to release the extinguishing agent.             

     Sweep the nozzle from side to side at the base of the flames until extinguished

 

Knowing how to operate the extinguisher is not the end of training. Employee responders to a fire also should be trained to adhere to the following protocol:

  • If appropriate, sound the fire alarm or call the fire department immediately.
  • Before approaching the fire, determine an evacuation route safe of flames, excessive heat and smoke. Do not allow this evacuation route to become blocked.
  • Use the PASS technique for discharging an extinguisher and back away from the area if the fire flares up again.
  • If the extinguisher is empty and the fire is not out, evacuate immediately.
  • If the fire grows beyond what can be safely handled, evacuate immediately.

 

Fire extinguishers are meant to handle only small fires. If a fire becomes too large or the environment becomes too dangerous, employees should know when and how to evacuate the area. If any of the following conditions are present, workers should follow evacuation procedures immediately and should not attempt to fight the fire with an extinguisher:

 

The fire is too large. The fire involves flammable solvents, is partially hidden behind a wall or ceiling, cannot be reached from a standing position, or covers more than 60 square feet in area.

The air is unsafe to breathe. Levels of smoke make the fire impossible to fight without some form of respiratory protection.

The environment is too hot or smoky. Radiated heat is easily felt, making it hard to approach a fire within adequate range of using the extinguisher (about 10-15 feet). It is necessary to crawl on the floor to avoid heat or smoke. Visibility is poor.

Evacuation paths are impaired. The fire is not contained and heat, smoke or flames block potential evacuation routes.

 

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Source: https://www.safetyandhealthmagazine.com/articles/5549-properly-using-a-fire-extinguisher-in-the-workplace


8 Tips to Reduce Warehouse Utility Knife Accidents

It goes without saying. ALWAYS exercise caution when using a utility knife.

But it’s easy to forget safety tips when you’re under the gun to open a large load of cartons, loads secured with nylon banding or pallets wrapped with multiple layers of stretch film. That’s when simple mistakes can turn into serious workplace injuries. In fact, a single serious cut from a box opener can easily exceed thousands of dollars for emergency medical care, workers’ compensation and lost productivity.

In addition to causing worker injury, using a utility knife improperly can also damage a carton’s contents, rendering the goods unsalable and more losses. Worse yet, cutting the inner contents can cause liquid and powder spills that present slip and fall dangers to co-workers or customers.

We know—you get it. Especially if you play a role in keeping your workplace safe and productive.

SAFE WAREHOUSE CUTTING TECHNIQUES

  1. PROPER POSITION. Position the carton so it’s a safe distance from your abdomen, hips and thighs. Then draw the knife away from your body. Always maintain a safe distance from co-workers and customers as you cut.
  2. SHARP IS SAFE. A dull blade requires additional pressure to make the cut or may tear the cardboard. Stop and change the blade when needed. A dull blade cuts erratically and can easily slip off the cutting path, increasing chances for injury.
  3. VISUAL GUIDANCE. Never use your thumb as a guide to position the blade. Instead, plan your cut visually and grasp the knife with your entire hand.
  4. CUT AWAY FOR HANDS. Hold the carton with your hand on the opposite side you’re cutting. Keep your hands and fingers away from the cutting area at all times.
  5. PROPER EXCHANGE. Never toss or hand a knife to a co-worker. Set it down and let the co-worker pick it up.
  6. BLADE DISPOSAL. Discard used blades in a safe blade storage receptacle. Never toss in the garbage where they might injure an unsuspecting person.
  7. SAFETY DROPS. If you drop a knife, don’t try to catch it. Let it fall to the floor. Then examine the blade and mechanism for possible damage before using it again.
  8. STRETCH FILM DIRECTION. Pull stretch film away from the pallet contents before starting the cut. Start cutting the film from the top of the pallet. Never slice stretch film from the bottom up.

 

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Source: https://olfa.com/professional/tips-to-reduce-warehouse-utility-knife-accidents/


It’s Never Too Late To Learn – First Aid/CPR Classes for Groups & Corporations

CPR/First Aid Training – Corporate and Group Classes

Green Guard offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, Green Guard’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Looking for a Team Building opportunity? Learn to save a life while providing a great team building exercise.

 

Call Now to speak with a Green Guard CPR/First Aid Training Specialist

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