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Man makes ‘miracle’ recovery from heart attack after strangers perform CPR

On July 23, building contractor Brian Boos, JDW, Inc. service repair supervisor Darren Ebaugh and FerrelGas technician Shawn Kainz were all called to a home in rural Oak Creek to fix a family’s furnace. The three men say they have crossed paths on job sites before but were essentially strangers. They didn’t even know each other’s names.

“Everything was meant to be. It was one of those days. One of those moments that everything was meant to be,” Boos told FOX31.

Upon arriving to the job site, Kainz began complaining of chest pains. He told Boos and Ebaugh that he planned to see a doctor after finishing the work on the furnace regulator.

“I felt like I had heartburn. That’s all I remember,” Kainz said.

Ebaugh was putting his tools in his truck while Boos and Kainz stood together outside the home. That’s when Kainz collapsed.

“He didn’t grab his chest. He didn’t say, ‘Oh no.’ He just turned and [fell],” Boos said.

Boos attempted to call 911 and despite having an extremely weak signal in the rural area, he was able to connect with emergency dispatch. They helped talk Ebaugh and Boos through nearly 15 minutes of CPR until paramedics arrived.

“Just looking at his eyes, his eyes were glazed over. From being a hunter, I’ve seen it a lot and I knew what it meant. He was gone,” Ebaugh said.

“For sure there was no life,” Boos said.

The two never stopped CPR.

“The bystander CPR saved him. They kept him alive until we could get here,” Oak Creek Fire EMS supervisor Angela Bracegirdle told FOX31.

She has been with the department for 19 years. In that time, she says often bystanders will give up on CPR after about two minutes, if they even step in to help at all.

“Just keep going. Don’t stop. Because you never know,” Bracegirdle said.

Bracegirdle and her team were able to get Kainz’s heart restarted and he began breathing on his own before he was loaded into an ambulance. On the way to the hospital, she says he went into cardiac arrest again and regained a pulse after they used an AED (automatic electronic defibrillator) on him.

“It was a widow maker,” Kainz told FOX31. “It was 100-percent clogged coronary artery on the top right.”

He spent less than a week in the hospital before being released. He is now recovering and those around him say his progress is a miracle.

“Monday, [I got] the call, ‘He wants to have dinner with you.’ It just blew me away. I never would have imaged he survived,” Ebaugh said.

“It doesn’t look like he has a dent on his bumper. He looks like a million bucks. It’s a miracle,” Boos said.

“Yes, it is. It is. In my 19 years, I’ve only seen two walk out of the hospital,” Bracegirdle said.

Oak Creek Fire Chief Chuck Wisecup says in his 36-year career, this is the first time he has seen someone survive CPR.

“I think everyone needs to learn CPR,” Kainz said. “I think it’ll be a big awareness for everybody to learn CPR.”

Boos had taken a CPR class seven years prior. Ebaugh hadn’t taken one since he was in high school 25 years ago. They both say they now plan to be re-certified on a yearly basis.

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The Top 9 OSHA Violations and How to Avoid them

OSHA could conduct an unexpected visit at your facility at any time.

It pays to be prepared. We’ve compiled a list of OSHA’s top 9 violations and the steps you can take to ensure your facility passes its next inspection.

1. Inadequate Fall Protection

One of the most common risks cited in OSHA’s summary is the danger of inadequate fall protection. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), there were 366 fatal falls to a lower level out of 971 construction fatalities in 2017. Employees can fall from elevated platforms or work stations, uncovered holes in the floor, or even a spill.

To prevent a fall in your facility, OHSA recommends:

  • Using guard rails and toe boards: These should be employed around holes in the floor, on elevated open-sided platforms, or around dangerous equipment or machinery.
  • Employing personal protective equipment: This can include safety harnesses to prevent falls where necessary.
  • Maintaining a clean facility: Keeping the floor and other facility spaces clean and dry can prevent or at least limit slips and falls.

2. Poor Hazard Communication

According to OSHA guidelines, workers have the right to “receive information and training (in a language and vocabulary the worker understands) about workplace hazards, methods to prevent them, and the OSHA standards that apply to their workplace.” Information about the identities and hazards of the chemicals present in your workplace must be made available and understandable to workers.

To comply with OSHA’s requirements, be sure to inform your employees of:

  • Hazard classifications: Each hazard should be easily identifiable and classifiable, meaning workers should be able to identify the chemical and result of chemical mixtures and their associated health and physical hazards.
  • Labels: Chemical manufacturers, importers, and handlers need to provide a precautionary label that includes a harmonized signal word, pictogram, and hazard statement for each hazard class and category. It is also important to note the native language of your employees so that they will be able to understand the communication measures being taken.
  • Safety data sheets: Employers should be providing safety data sheets that follow the 16-section format listed on OSHA’s website.
  • Information and training: Employers are required to update and continuously train workers on any changing or added labels being provided in their workplace. They should be familiar with safe chemical handling processes.

3. Dangerous Scaffolding

If you have any scaffolding present in your workplace, you can be sure an OSHA inspector will examine it; unsafe scaffolds are the third most frequently cited violation. Every year, 4,500 injuries and over 60 deaths result just from scaffolding injuries, losing American employers about $90 million in lost workdays. In a recent BLS study, 72% of workers injured in scaffold accidents said it was from either planking or support giving out, or the employee slipping or being struck by a falling object.

All of these accidents can be prevented or better controlled by compliance with OSHA standards, including remembering to:

  • Routinely check all scaffolding: Scaffolds used during construction or in day-to-day operations must comply with OHSA’s standards to prevent falls, including using construction-grade lumber capable of supporting up to 1,500 lbs.

4. Unsafe Ladders

As with scaffolding, ladders used during construction or in day-to-day operations must comply with OHSA’s standards to prevent falls. Employees must also be properly educated on procedures for the safe use of ladders, like not holding heavy items and only using a ladder for shorter periods of time. Without using these regulations, workers are put at major risk of injury. According to BLS, ladder-related incidents led to more than 150 worker fatalities and more than 20,000 nonfatal injuries in 2015.

To avoid these risks:

  • Routinely check all ladders: Ladders used regularly must also comply with OSHA’s standards to ensure safety.

5. Insufficient Respiratory Protection

Harmful gases, dust, fog, smokes, mists, vapors, or sprays can put your workers at risk of lung impairment, lung cancer, and death – yet these risks are easily avoidable with the proper use of respiratory equipment. While it isn’t always comfortable to wear, it is absolutely vital for worker safety. Not only should employers ensure respiratory protection is provided, but they should also ensure:

  • Correct fit: Respiratory equipment should fit the face securely to ensure effective usage.
  • Applicability: The equipment should be properly suited for the task and hazard.

6. Insufficient Eye and Face Protection

Eye and face injuries account for an estimated $300 million annually in medical bills, compensation, and time off; these injuries also make up nearly 45% of all head injuries that lead to missed workdays. Workers can be blinded by chemical, environmental, radiological, or mechanical irritants and hazards.

As with respiratory protection, eye and face protection should be appropriate for the task and hazard at hand and may range from basic safety goggles to a welding helmet. Regulations can encompass details like the size of protection to the tint of eyewear, so be sure to review all requirements to confirm adherence within your facility.

  • Provide proper protection: Make sure all employees have consistent access to face and eye protection while on the job.
  • Eye or face injury training: Regularly remind employees not just about proper eye and face safety but also about how to handle situations if injuries do arise, such as the proper use of eyewash stations.

7. Poor Control of Hazardous Energy

The unexpected release of stored energy (electrical, mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, chemical, thermal or other sources) in machines and equipment can result in injury or death. Employees who service or maintain machinery and other equipment are at the greatest risk from the unexpected release of hazardous energy, such as a steam valve being turned on while a worker is repairing a connection in the piping. Injuries may include electrocution, burns, crushing, laceration, or more serious injuries.

Compliance with lockout/tagout standards prevents an estimated 120 fatalities and 50,000 injuries each year.

  • Follow Lockout/Tagout Practices: Be sure to follow all lockout/tagout guidelines to prevent accidental stored energy releases while employees are engaging or otherwise working with the machinery.

8. Unsafe Forklifts or Powered Industrial Trucks

More commonly known as forklifts, powered industrial trucks present many hazards including falling load accidents, pedestrian safety, and trucks being driven off loading docks. In addition to adhering to OSHA’s requirements, also make sure to enforce:

  • Age restrictions: No one under 18 years of age operates a forklift.
  • Training requirements: Operators over 18 years of age are trained, certified, and fully aware of all forklift-related hazards.

9. Inadequate Machine Guarding

Any machine with moving parts is potentially hazardous to workers and can cause crushed fingers, amputations, burns, blindness, and other injuries. The type of safeguarding depends very much on the machine but may include railing to safeguard by safe distance, warning signs, enclosures, screening, grating, and other methods. OSHA notes that when accidental contact and accidents occur, the hazard must be eliminated or controlled to prevent further injury.

  • Routinely check machine guards: Guard machines should be properly installed and maintained. Check around your facility regularly to ensure the guards are in place and being used correctly by various team members.

 

 

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Source: https://www.thomasnet.com/insights/osha-top-10-violations/


Can You Find The Defibrillator At Work?

About 10,000 cardiac arrests happen in workplaces each year, according to the American Heart Association. Using an automatic external defibrillator can increase the chance of survival.

Do you know where your workplace’s automated external defibrillator is located? About half of all U.S. employees don’t, according to the results of an American Heart Association survey.

The survey also found that workers in the hospitality and service industry, which includes hotels and restaurants, were less likely to know the location of their workplace’s AED. About 66 percent of them didn’t know where it was. Workers in schools and other education facilities were the most likely to be able to find it: About 61 percent said they knew the AED’s location.

However, the survey didn’t follow up and ask whether the workplace had an AED, and also didn’t try to distinguish between who didn’t know where the AED was and those who didn’t know if there was an AED on site. That makes the findings less clear.

For every minute that you’re in cardiac arrest, you’re pulseless, your [chance of ] survival drops by 10 percent

An AED checks the heart’s rhythm and can send an electric shock to the heart to try to restore a normal rhythm.

More than 350,000 cardiac arrests take place in the U.S. in locations other than hospitals each year, according to the American Heart Association. In 2015, Nancy Holland, a resident of Leawood, Kan., became one of them.

She went into cardiac arrest in the restroom of a restaurant where she had been eating dinner with her husband. The restaurant’s manager performed CPR until paramedics arrived with an AED.

Holland says she’s lucky the restaurant’s manager knew CPR, because it kept her “salvageable” until the paramedics showed up. When he started working as a restaurant manager, she says, his mom had told him he owed it to the customers to learn CPR — just in case.

Now whenever she walks into a building, she scans the walls looking for an AED.

“I hope I never need it, but it’s always in the back of my mind,” Holland says.

She also gives talks about the importance of CPR and AED training, emphasizing that cardiac arrest can happen to anyone.

Holland was in her 40s and didn’t have any health problems when she went into cardiac arrest. She had been to her doctor for a checkup just three weeks earlier.

And she’s now a board member of her local chapter of the HeartSafe Foundation, which provides free training in hands-only CPR and works to improve public access to AEDs.

She also says businesses should take precautions before an emergency happens.

About 10,000 cardiac arrests happen in workplaces each year, the AHA says.

More than half of employees — about 55 percent — aren’t offered first aid or CPR/AED training through their employer, the American Heart Association survey found. And sometimes employees have access to only one form of training.

But most of the 2,000 employees surveyed say their employers should offer first aid and CPR/AED training. Ninety percent say they would participate in training if their employers provided them.

Cost and fear of liability are two reasons that businesses don’t install AEDs.

A typical AED costs about $1,200 to $1,500 and prices have gone down over time as the technology becomes more widespread. Machines that once cost $3,000 now run under $1,000, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures, which tracks the passage of laws related to AEDs.

When it comes to legal liability if an AED is used improperly and someone is injured or killed, in most states you’re protected by law.

In addition, AEDs have a built-in mechanism for analyzing heart rhythms and evaluating whether a shock is needed.

But AEDs do need to be maintained in order to be effective. Batteries should be replaced every two to five years, depending on the model. And the sticky pads that adhere to a cardiac arrest victim’s skin also come with expiration dates and need to be replaced about every two to three years.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration doesn’t require workplaces to have AEDs, but it does encourage employers to have them on-site.

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Sources: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/06/19/533269211/can-you-find-the-defibrillator-at-work-half-of-people-say-no

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“Second chance at life:” Daughter uses CPR to save life of father in cardiac arrest

A 26-year-old lifeguard trained in CPR saved her father’s life

A 59-year-old Town of Farmington man was hosting a family gathering at his Green Lake home on Friday when he became unresponsive.

The man had no prior cardiac history.

His stepdaughter recognized the signs of cardiac distress and started CPR.

“The early intervention of CPR by the stepdaughter provided the critical time needed to get first responders on scene with the AED. Thanks to her, this man has a second chance at life.” Washington County Sheriff Martin Schulteis said. “Stories like this clearly demonstrate the importance for everyone to know basic CPR. One day you may need it to save a loved one, just as this stepdaughter did.”

The man regained consciousness before he was transported to the hospital.

The family said the man has recovered and is set to be released today.

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Source:https://www.cbs58.com/news/second-chance-at-life-daughter-uses-cpr-to-save-life-of-father-in-cardiac-arrest


‘Couldn’t let him go:’ Washington County woman saved stepfather’s life with CPR

A Washington County woman jumped into action to save her stepfather’s life. The 26-year-old performed CPR until first responders arrived to help.

 

“I mean, it was crazy,” said Rachel Nelson. “You sort of have to block the chaos out and focus on the job at hand.”

Nelson and her stepfather, Curt Vorpahl, were hanging out with family on Friday, July 19.

“We thought it was going to be a great day to be out on the lake,” said Vorpahl.

Rachel Nelson, Curt Vorpahl

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The family was gathered when Vorpahl suddenly went into cardiac arrest.

“The last thing I remember was thinking how warm it was for it starting to become the evening,” said Vorpahl. Vorpahl’s pulse faded away, and Nelson quickly reacted.

“I started immediately with compressions, followed by rescue breaths. I continued that for five minutes or so,” said Nelson. It involved five minutes of intense focus.

“I was thinking of my family the whole time, how I couldn’t let him go. I didn’t want to let my family down,” said Nelson.

A first responder was nearby, providing a pocket mask and AED.

“He was shocked by the AED,” said Nelson. Vorpahl made it to the hospital.

“I still don’t believe it,” Vorpahl said. “It’s like it never happened.”

Hearing how many people fought for his life brought Vorpahl immense gratitude and emotion. “Every second count’s in a situation like this,” said Nelson.

Nelson learned CPR as a teenage lifeguard. Over the years, she renewed her certification and urged everyone to get theirs. The family was working with neighbors to hopefully put together a CPR course so more people can learn the life-saving skill.

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Source: https://fox6now.com/2019/07/24/couldnt-let-him-go-washington-county-woman-saved-stepfathers-life-with-cpr/


5 Forklift Safety Elements – Part 5 “Know About Load Basics”

Forklift Safety Elements – Know About Load Basics

OSHA advises operators to check loads before picking them up with the forks, ensuring the load’s stability and dimensions will allow for safe transport. Move squarely in front of the load and move the forks apart as far as possible before driving them under the load. Make sure to not overload and that the load is centered.

Slightly tilt the forklift mast backward before lifting. Lift the load enough to clear the floor or rack. For stacking, OSHA recommends lifting the load above the lower stack by about 10 centimeters, or 4 inches.

When placing a load, operators should be squarely in front of the placement destination.  Make sure the area is flat and stable, and don’t place heavy loads on top of light ones. Lower the forks upon placing the load, and then back the forklift away. As always, ensure the load is stable.

 

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Source:https://www.safetyandhealthmagazine.com/articles/16138-elements-of-forklift-safety


5 Forklift Safety Elements – Part 4 “Understand The Stability Triangle”

Understand the ‘stability triangle’

An unloaded lift truck’s center of gravity – where the weight has equal concentration – typically is higher than that of a personal vehicle. The load has its own center of gravity, and once it’s picked up, a combined center of gravity between the load and truck is established.

Lift trucks are built on three-point suspension systems, the physics of which resemble a triangle. Support points lie at both ends of the front axle, with another located at the center of the rear axle. Together, this forms a “stability triangle” that operators must stay within when the truck is in motion.

Numerous factors can cause a lift truck to vacate the stability triangle, including unstable, heavy, wide or raised loads; fast starts and stops; taking corners too quickly; and rough terrain.

Here are several tips to help prevent forklifts from tipping over:

  • Before operation, ensure a load is completely stable and secured on the forks.
  • Keep loads low to the ground during operation.
  • Keep loads uphill when climbing or descending an incline.
  • Drive slowly in wet or slippery conditions.
  • Slow down during turns, and honk the horn upon encountering traffic.

Stay tuned for Part – 5 ” Know about load basics” coming next week.

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Source:https://www.safetyandhealthmagazine.com/articles/16138-elements-of-forklift-safety


13-Year-Old Scientist’s Research Shows Hand Dryers Can Hurt Kids’ Ears

Hand dryers are ubiquitous in public restrooms, the noise they make may be harmful to children’s ears.

According to research recently published in the Canadian journal Paediatrics & Child Health, And the study’s author can speak from personal experience.

 

“Sometimes after using hand dryers my ears would start ringing,” 13-year-old Nora Keegan from Calgary, Canada, tells NPR. “I also noticed that children would not want to use hand dryers, and they’d be covering their ears.”

So when she was 9, Nora decided to test the volume of hand dryers and find out if they were detrimental to children’s hearing. Nora’s research confirming her hypothesis was published in June.

Nora Keegan takes measurements in 2016 (Courtesy of the Keegan family)

Hand dryers are actually really, really loud, and especially at children’s heights since they’re close to where the air comes out,” says Nora, noting that children’s ears are more sensitive.

For the study, which was conducted between 2015 and 2017, she visited more than 40 public washrooms in Alberta, Canada. She used a professional decibel meter to measure sound levels of hand dryers from various heights and distances.

The young scientist then presented her research at a Calgary Youth Science Fair earlier this year.

She discovered that Xlerator hand dryers and two types of Dyson Airblade hand dryers posed the greatest threats to children’s hearing. These types all exceed 100 decibels — a volume that can lead to “learning disabilities, attention difficulties, and ruptured eardrums,” according to the study.

“My loudest measurement was 121 decibels from a Dyson Airblade model,” she says. “And this is not good because Health Canada doesn’t allow toys for children to be sold over 100 decibels, as they know that they can damage children’s hearing.”

In response to these results, Dyson confirmed to NPR in an email that an acoustics engineer would be meeting with Nora to discuss her research. Excel Dryer, the company that sells Xlerator hand dryers, did not respond to a request for comment before this story was published.

“While some other units operated at low sound levels, many units were louder at children’s ear heights than at adult ear heights,” the study concludes.

Nora hopes her findings will spark more research into the issue and eventually lead Canada to regulate noise levels for hand dryers. But for now, she’s taking a break and spending her summer like many 13-year-olds — at camp.

Update July 12: Excel Dryer, which owns Xlerator hand dryers, provided this statement after this story was originally published:

At Excel Dryer, we are committed to our customers.  User experience is very important to us, which is why all our high-speed, energy-efficient models come with adjustable sound and speed controls as a standard feature. This allows facilities the ability to choose the best settings for their restroom environments.

Click here to read our post on hand dryer v paper towel hygiene – It’s shockingly dirty!

 

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Source: https://www.npr.org/2019/07/09/739783918/hand-dryers-harm-childrens-hearing-canadian-study-shows


5 Forklift Safety Elements – Part 3 (Know The Machinery & Rules)

Know the machinery – and the rules

Although lift trucks and personal vehicles share some similarities, they ultimately are quite different.

Among the differences:

  • Open structure; the driver is not completely enclosed
  • Weights ranging from 9,000 to 30,000 pounds, with rough-terrain lift trucks at the heavier end
  • Traveling speeds of less than 20 mph, closer to a walking pace
  • Three-point suspension
  • More prone to tipping overloaded or not – and varying stability
  • Tighter turning radius for operating in tight spots

Operators should always wear seat belts. Neglecting to do so can cause an operator to be ejected from the forklift’s protective cage if the truck turns over, resulting in a possible serious injury or fatality.

An operator always should be aware of his or her surroundings on the job site, as the load or environment may obstruct visibility.

It’s vital that drivers are aware of and making eye contact with, pedestrians or other workers during operation. OSHA best practices for maintaining visibility include:

  • Keep a clear view.
  • Always look in the direction of travel.
  • Use spotters or aids such as rear-view mirrors to boost visibility.
  • Use headlights if working at night, outdoors or in areas in which additional lighting would improve visibility. OSHA requires forklifts to be equipped with headlights when general lighting is less than 2 lumens per square foot.

 

Stay tuned for Part – 4 “Understanding the stability triangle” coming next week.

 

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Source: https://www.safetyandhealthmagazine.com/articles/16138-elements-of-forklift-safety

 


Less Than 20% Of Americans Are CPR Certified – Is Your Team Ready To Save A Life?

CPR/First Aid Training – Corporate and Group Classes

Green Guard offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, Green Guard’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Looking for a Team Building opportunity? Learn to save a life while providing a great team building exercise.

Schedule Your Class Now

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