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Pet first aid – What you need to know

We love our pets! Below we list of a number of quick Pet First Aid tips. This list is meant as intermediary steps. You should also consult a veterinarian.

Pet First Aid

Do you know what to do during a pet emergency? Here are some common emergency tips:

  • If your cat or dog is dehydrated, pull up on the skin between the shoulder blades. It should spring right back; if it stays tented this is a sign of dehydration.
  • Signs of pet poisoning include bleeding externally or internally, dilated pupils, drooling or foaming at the mouth, seizures or other abnormal mental state or behavior. If suspect your pet has been poisoned, contact Animal Poison Control 888-426-4435
  • Signs of heat stroke or heat exhaustion include collapse; body temperature of 104 degrees F or above; bloody diarrhea or vomiting; wobbliness; excessive panting or difficulty breathing; increase heart rate; mucous membranes very red; and increased salivation.
  • Pets bitten by other animals need vet attention to prevent the wound (even if minor) from becoming infected and to check for internal wounds. You should never break up a dogfight yourself because you could be bitten.
  • If your pet is bleeding, apply direct pressure using gauze over the bleeding site. If blood soaks through, apply more gauze (do not removed soaked gauze) until you can reach a veterinary hospital.
  • If your pet has a seizure, make sure it is in a safe place, but do not restrain the animal. Keep your hands away from its mouth as your pet may not know who you are during a seizure and could bite you.
  • Know where to go in case of an emergency. Your regular veterinarian is a great place if the emergency occurs during the day. If the the emergency occurs in the evening or weekends it may be necessary to go to the emergency clinic in your area. Most are open 24 hours a day 7 days a week.
  • Ensure important phone numbers such as your veterinarian, emergency vet hospitals, or emergency contacts are easily accessible.
  • Pack a pet first aid kit. It is best if you can have one for her car, and one for at home use. Fill it not only with useful supplies, but also keep a copy of your pet’s medical records with your pets name, age, breed microchip number, vaccine history, and any pre-existing conditions.

This last point is especially helpful if you regularly use a pet sitter or babysitter and will ensure that this person will have all they need should an emergency arise.

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73-year-old saved with CPR

Lewis Family Drug pharmacist Lisa Thelen, left, meets Dennis Scott for the first time since he suffered cardiac arrest in the County Fair Food Store on Thursday afternoon. Scott suffered cardiac arrest back on Feb. 16 collapsing near the customer service counter where Thelen was one of the stores employees who rushed to Scott’s aid when he went to the floor. (Matt Gade / Republic)

Dennis Scott entered Lewis Family Drug on Feb. 16 and collapsed near the customer service counter suffering from Cardiac Arrest.

Elimae Stubbe noticed Scott was very pale. When Scott suddenly collapsed. She immediately began compressions.

“He was very pale, and the look on his face was like someone was going to have a heart attack.”

She leapt.

“My instincts kicked in,” Stubbe said.

She had performed CPR once before on a family member. She since let her certification expire.

“I just did compressions,” Stubbe said. “Lisa from Lewis Drug did compressions and gave mouth-to-mouth.”

Scott said of the incident:

“I woke up with a second life,” he said. In gratitude, “I’d maybe like to contribute, give back, a little more.”

Source: The Daily Republic

 

 

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Do you know how to recognize and help someone who is choking?

Choking is a common cause of accidental death and often preventable. Objects such as food, candy or small objects can easily become lodged in the airway if they are accidentally ‘breathed in’ rather than swallowed.

Signs and symptoms of choking

  • Unable to speak or cough
  • Grasping or pointing to the throat
  • Distressed look on the face
  • First aid treatment of choking

Encourage the patient to cough, If the choking is only mild, this will clear the obstruction and the patient should be able to speak to you.

If the obstruction is not cleared:

Give back blows

Call for help, but don’t leave the patient yet.

Bend them forward so the head is lower than the chest. For a smaller child, you can place them over your knee to do this.

Give up to 5 firm blows between the shoulder blades with the palm of your hand. Check between blows and stop if you clear the obstruction.

If the obstruction is still not cleared:

Give abdominal thrusts

  • Stand behind the person and wrap your arms around the waist.
  • Place your clenched fist just above the person’s navel. Grab your fist with your other hand.
  • Quickly pull inward and upward as if trying to lift the person up.
  • Perform a total of 5 abdominal thrusts.
  • If the blockage is still not dislodged, continue cycles of 5 back blows and 5 abdominal thrusts until the object is coughed up or the person starts to breathe or cough.
  • Take the object out of his mouth only if you can see it. Never do a finger sweep unless you can see the object in the person’s mouth

Give CPR, if necessary

If the obstruction comes out, but the person is becomes unconscious, begin CPR.

Continue CPR until medical personnel arrives.

 

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Should you restrain a person having a seizure?

Approximately 1 out of 10 people have had a seizure. Because seizures are very common, it’s important to learn what to do to help keep that person safe until the seizure stops.

There are many types of seizures. Most seizures end in a few minutes.

These are general steps to help someone who is having any type seizure:

  • Stay with the person until the seizure ends and he or she is fully awake. After it ends, help the person sit in a safe place. Once they are alert and able to communicate, tell them what happened in very simple terms.
  • Comfort the person and speak calmly.
  • Check to see if the person is wearing a medical bracelet or other emergency information.
  • Keep yourself and other people calm.
  • Offer to call a taxi or another person to make sure the person gets home safely.

A seizure (fit) occurs due to excessive and disorganized electrical activity in our brain. A major seizure occurs when the victim falls to the ground and starts shaking uncontrollably. This is known as a tonic-clonic seizure or a grand mal seizure.

Victims of a major seizure are normally unconscious during the episode and not aware of their surroundings.

There are many myths about the correct first aid treatment for a victim having a seizure. One of these myths is around restraining a victim to stop them from injuring themselves – this is incorrect and potentially dangerous!

  • Do not hold the person down or try to stop his or her movements.
  • Do not put anything in the person’s mouth. This can injure teeth or the jaw. A person having a seizure cannot swallow his or her tongue.
  • Do not try to give mouth-to-mouth breaths (like CPR). People usually start -breathing again on their own after a seizure.
  • Do not offer the person water or food until he or she is fully alert.

Attempting to restrain the victim will not shorten the duration of the seizure or speed up the victim’s recovery. This myth has the potential to cause serious harm to a seizure victim.

The Correct First Aid Steps for a Seizure

The following first aid steps should be carried out for a victim having a major seizure (fit):

  • Call for emergency medical help
  • Move on any bystanders
  • Move away from any potential hazards from the victim and protect their head
  • Once the seizure finishes, roll the victim onto their side and ensure the airway is open and they are breathing
  • Don’t attempt to restrain the victim or place anything in their mouth
  • If the victim stops breathing then start CPR immediately and call for a defibrillator.

CDC Seizure First Aid

 

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What are the best way to manage insect bites and stings?

Common reactions to insect bites and stings are mild. Often causing little more than stinging, redness and itching or minor swelling. Rarely do insect bites and stings, such as from a bee, a wasp, a hornet, a fire ant or a scorpion, can result in severe reactions.

To take care of an insect bite or sting that causes a mild reaction:

  • Move to a safe area to avoid more bites or stings.
  • If needed, remove the stinger.
  • Wash the area with soap and water.
  • Apply a cool compress. Use a cloth dampened with cold water or filled with ice. This helps reduce pain and swelling. If the injury is on an arm or leg, elevate it.
  • Apply 0.5 or 1 percent hydrocortisone cream, calamine lotion or a baking soda paste to the bite or sting several times daily until your symptoms go away.
  • Take an antihistamine (Benadryl, others) to reduce itching.
  • Usually, the signs and symptoms of a bite or sting disappear in a day or two. If you’re concerned — even if your reaction is minor — call your doctor.

Call 911 or your local emergency number if the injured person experiences:

  • Difficulty breathing
  • Swelling of the lips, eyelids or throat
  • Dizziness, faintness or confusion
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Hives
  • Nausea, cramps or vomiting
  • A scorpion sting and is a child
  • Take these actions immediately while waiting for medical help:

Ask the person if he or she is carrying an epinephrine autoinjector (EpiPen, Auvi-Q, others) to treat an allergic attack.

If the person says he or she needs to use an autoinjector, ask whether you should help inject the medication. This is usually done by pressing the autoinjector against the person’s thigh and holding it in place for several seconds.

Loosen tight clothing and cover the person with a blanket. Don’t give him or her anything to drink.

If the person is vomiting, position him or her to prevent choking.

Begin CPR if the person shows no signs of circulation, such as breathing, coughing or movement.

For more information see this Mayo Clinic article

 

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First Aid Service – CPR Certification – First Aid Cabinet refill – Facility Services – First Aid – Safety Training


Do you know the 5 steps for lifesaving CPR?

More than 350,000 people had sudden cardiac arrest outside of a hospital in 2017. Those who received CPR were two to three times more likely to survive.

Joshua Moeckly, a Mayo Clinic cardiac nurse, explains the five steps you should go through in an effort to save a life.

It’s a moment everyone hopes they never experience, but it could happen any time: finding a person in cardiac arrest unconscious and nonresponsive.

Moeckly says:

  1. Make sure the scene is safe before approaching the person.
  2. Call 911 and get help on the way.
  3. Check for breathing and a pulse.
  4. If the person is not breathing and has no pulse, Moeckly says it’s time to start chest compressions.

Using both hands, push down on the person’s sternum about 2-2 inches.

“Typically, you want to go to 100 to 120 beats per minute,” Moeckly says. “And the most common song people think of when they perform CPR is “Stayin’ Alive” by the Bee Gees,”

After about 30 compressions,

  1. Rescue breaths.

“You want to ensure that their airway is open before you administer a breath to them,” Moeckly says. “So you’ll tilt their head and then breathe into their mouth a full, deep second, take a deep breath, (and) breathe into their mouth for another deep second.”

Moeckly says, from there, the best thing you can do is to repeat the process until the person wakes up or help arrives.

Source: July 9, 2018 by From Mayo Clinic News Network, Mayo Clinic News Network

#AED #Defibrillator #SuddenCardiacArrest  #GreenGuardCorp  #AED

 

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What’s the difference between a sprain and a strain, and what the heck is R.I.C.E Therapy?

Sprains and strains are often used interchangeably. While very common for a first responder to encounter, they are not the same thing.

Sprain

A sprain is a stretch or tear in a ligament. Ligaments are bands of fibrous tissue that connect bones to bones at joints.

Excessive force applied to a joint can cause these ligaments to tear – this is a sprain. Usually when a person falls, twists, or is hit in a way that forces the body out of its normal position.

The most common type of sprain is a sprained ankle. About 25,000 people sprain an ankle every day.

Strain

A strain is also a stretch or tear, but it happens in a muscle or a tendon. Tendons link muscles to the bones. This is very common in contact sports like football, boxing and hockey.

Treatment of sprains and strains

Although there is a difference between sprains and strains the first aid treatment of both is the same.

This is known as RICE therapy.

-Rest

-Ice

-Comfortable support / Compression

-Elevation

This simple first aid treatment will relieve swelling and subsequently relieve the pain from these injuries.

Always seek medical attention if the pain and swelling don’t start to lessens after 24 to 72 hours.

 

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OTC Medications In The Workplace? Here’s What Your Co Workers Think…

89% of workers indicated that having OTC medications available from a nurse made it possible to complete their shift

University of Michigan Study Findings:

  • The workers surveyed reported visiting their company’s health/medical department on average 10 times per year.
  • The top four worker complaints that occurred while on the job were headaches, colds/sinus problems, muscle ache/pain, and burns.
  • 73% of those surveyed regularly experienced headaches and cold and sinus symptoms while at work.
  • More than half (55%) of those surveyed experienced muscle and joint pain at work.
  • Almost half (46%) of employees experienced cuts and burns on their skin while on the job.
  • 89% of those surveyed believed the over0the-counter medications provided by the company helped them feel well enough to complete their shifts.
  • Employees strongly agree with the statement: “I highly recommend having over-the-counter medications available to workers in other work sites that currently do not have over-the-counter medications in place.”

University of Michigan workplace study sponsored by Medique Products.

Other Facts About Lost TIme in the Workplace:

  • According to the Centers for Disease Control there are 358 million work-loss days each year related to acute conditions.
  • Each year, there are more than 75 million work-loss days due to influenza.

Contact a Green Guard representative today for a free consultation.

Call 1-800-869-6970

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12 million Americans have hearing loss as a result of exposure to noise, Here’s how to avoid it…

Did you know you can permanently lose your hearing from prolonged exposure to noise!

12 million Americans have hearing loss as a result of exposure to noise, noise-induced hearing loss.

Here are three simple prevention methods

  1. Wearing hearing protection when around sounds louder than 85dB for 30 minutes or more.
  2. Turning down the volume when listening to the radio, the TV, MP3 player, or anything through ear buds and headphones.
  3. Walking away from loud noise.

Noise-induced hearing loss is caused by damage to the microscopic hair cells, or cilia, which are found in the inner ear. Cilia are small sensory cells that convert the sounds we hear (sound energy) into electrical signals that travel to the brain. Once damaged, our hair cells cannot be repaired or grow back, causing permanent hearing loss.

The loudness of sound is measured in units called decibels (dB). Noise-induced hearing loss is caused by prolonged exposure to any loud noise over 85 (dB), such as concerts, sporting events, lawnmowers, fireworks, MP3 players at full volume, and more. A brief exposure to a very intense sound, such as a gun shot near the ear, can also damage your hearing.

An environment is too loud and considered dangerous if you:

  1. Have to shout over background noise to be heard.
  2. It is painful to your ears.
  3. It makes your ears ring during and after exposure.

If you have decreased or “muffled” hearing for several hours after exposure, that is a sign of temporary and possibly permanent hearing damage.

Howard Leight MAX 30

Hearing loss not only affects your ability to understand speech but it also has a negative impact on your social and emotional well-being. Noise-induced hearing loss can occur gradually over time, and people don’t often realize they are changing the way they live to make up for the disability.

 

Howard Leight Thunder Muff 29

If you suspect you may have hearing loss, make an appointment to see an audiologist. He or she will perform a hearing test to determine the type and severity of hearing loss you may have.

Shop Now for Hearing Protection

 

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Sports Drinks V Water, What You Need To Know

 

“The basic guideline for most people is that if you are doing continuous exercise for 60 minutes or less, then water is fine.” Says Suzanne Gerard Eberle, sports dietitian and author of Endurance Sports Nutrition.

This is because sports drinks include electrolytes (which help regulate nerves and muscles), carbohydrates (which help restore the body’s glycogen — or fuel — levels) and water (which helps hydrate).1

Because of this, electrolyte drinks do more to restore virtual nutrients of a longer period of time while working or exercising. This is allows your body to stay at peak performance during strenuous activities.

Every second you work or exercise, you are losing important fluids and nutrients that keep your body at full capacity.

Hydration is your body’s ability to manage this loss and return to its prime working condition. But this is what you really need to remember. When you’re hydrated, the fluid level in your body is exactly where it should be, in balance. When you’re dehydrated, your fluid level is off, out of balance. Hydrating in hot and cold conditions is critical to maintaining balance for performing well at work.

So how does your body get in balance?

With a lot of help from your brain. The process is called homeostasis. Here’s how it works. Your body has a special receptor that detects any changes that happen inside of you. When you lose fluids, this receptor notifies the hypothalamus in your brain, which regulates your body’s temperature. Your hypothalamus takes it from there to carry out homeostasis and put your body back in balance. It does this by increasing the blood flow to your skin surface, triggering sweating and thirst. When you’re thirsty, you know you need to hydrate. But drinking water alone won’t do the job. Water doesn’t contain the electrolytes your body needs to keep it in balance. That’s why you need Sqwincher. Sqwincher hydration solutions contain a correct balance of sodium, potassium and other key electrolytes. And these are the exact minerals your body needs to keep it working well and in tip-top shape.

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Source

  1. Hydration: Water vs. sports drinkhttps://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/wellness/hydration-water-vs-sports-drink/2012/08/10/7f2f71dc-dda1-11e1-af1d-753c613ff6d8_story.html?utm_term=.437cb408c3d4

 

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