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It’s Sudden Cardiac Awareness Month – Learn CPR

CPR/First Aid Training – Corporate and Group Classes

Over 300,000 Americans die every year from Sudden Cardiac Arrest, be sure your company has first responders trained and ready to help save a life.

We make it easy! Green Guard offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, Green Guard’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

Looking for a Team Building opportunity? Learn to save a life while providing a great team-building exercise.

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Sudden Cardiac Arrest Awareness Month – What You Should Know

More than 350,000 deaths occur each year as a result of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA)

SCA claims one life every two minutes, taking more lives each year than breast cancer, lung cancer, or AIDS. To decrease the death toll from SCA, it is important to understand what SCA is, what warning signs are, and how to respond and prevent SCA from occurring. More than 65 percent of Americans not only underestimate the seriousness of SCA, but also believe SCA is a type of heart attack. But they are not the same thing.

Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Awareness

October is Sudden Cardiac Arrest Awareness Month, which represents a critical initiative by the Heart Rhythm Society to raise awareness for Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) and help the public become more familiar with what it is, how it affects people, and what can be done to help save lives.

The Society’s award-winning “Apples and Oranges” campaign uses a simple analogy to educate people about the difference between a heart attack and SCA. More than 65 percent of Americans not only underestimate the seriousness of SCA, but also believe SCA is a type of heart attack. The campaign targets heart attack survivors, who are at the highest risk for SCA, and stresses the importance of maintaining a healthy heart lifestyle and learning critical risk markers, especially their Ejection Fraction (EF).

This public service announcement explains the dangers of SCA and features Emmy-award winning journalist Shaun Robinson.

About Sudden Cardiac Arrest

  • More than 350,000 deaths occur each year as a result of sudden cardiac arrest.
  • SCA claims one life every two minutes, taking more lives each year than breast cancer, lung cancer, or AIDS.
  • To decrease the death toll from SCA, it is important to understand what SCA is, what warning signs are, and how to respond and prevent SCA from occurring.

Responding to SCA — Time is Everything

Time-to-treatment is critical when considering the chance of survival for an SCA victim. Ninety-five percent of those who experience SCA die because they do not receive life-saving defibrillation within four to six minutes, before brain and permanent death start to occur. Learn more about the steps to take when responding to a potential SCA emergency.

SCA Resources

Patients can access information about SCA, including causes, prevention, and other important facts.

SCArisk.org

Learn your SCA risk by using an interactive online tool. It’s fast and easy — simply answer a few questions regarding your health and get your results. After you have finished using the assessment, please consult with your physician regarding your results.

 

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Source: https://www.hrsonline.org/sudden-cardiac-arrest-sca-awareness


Is Your Eye Wash Station Compliant?

The OSHA Medical and First Aid Standard 29 CFR 1910.151 ( c ) states “where the eyes or body of any person may be exposed to injurious corrosive materials, suitable facilities for quick drenching or flushing of the eyes and body shall be provided within the work area for immediate emergency use”.

However, OSHA doesn’t clarify minimum standards for ‘suitable facilities’ and therefore, employers often refer to ANSI for guidance.

Emergency eyewashes often go unused for long periods of time. Therefore, it’s important to test them regularly to ensure that they are working correctly when they are required. Most employers refer to ANSI Z358.1-2014 for guidance on what to inspect and be aware of.

ANSI Z358.1-2014 (section 5.5.2) states that plumbed eyewash equipment should be activated on a weekly basis long enough to ensure that flushing fluid is provided. This standard also requires tests of temperature, operation of valves, checks on flushing fluid and whether it needs to be changed, etc. Of course, it is difficult to prove that these checks have been undertaken if records are not kept.

However, in addition to this standard, the manufacturer’s recommendations usually state that devices should be inspected and tested and the results recorded, on a weekly basis.

 

Did you know Green Guard First Aid & Safety offers onsite service to help maintain your eyewash station? 

Do you manage your own eyewash station? Green Guard provides eye-wash station inspection checklists to help you meet compliance easily and affordably.

 

 

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Post-Dispatch’s Goold helps save man’s life at Busch Stadium

Before he chronicled the Cardinals’ first division title-clinching since 2015, Post-Dispatch baseball writer Derrick Goold helped save a man’s life Sunday at Busch Stadium.

St. Louis-based videographer Mike Flanary, 64, collapsed in the Cubs’ dugout before the game and was briefly without a pulse before CPR was performed by Goold, a longtime former lifeguard and Eagle Scout trained in CPR. After receiving further medical attention from the Cubs’ training staff and then emergency medical personnel, Flanary was transferred to Barnes-Jewish Hospital.

Medical officials said Flanary, who was working for a Chicago television affiliate for Sunday’s game, was in “critical but stable” condition after suffering a heart attack and then a stroke.

Cardinals’ security director Phil Melcher, asked about Goold’s immediate assistance, said it was “huge. You cannot discount that, at all. I absolutely thanked him.”

Washington University’s Dr. David Tan, the stadium doctor on duty Sunday at Busch, said, “So many people are afraid of doing CPR. But, because of (Goold’s) actions, he was the first link in that chain of survival.

“It’s fabulous. It was the early CPR by Derrick Goold that probably saved his life. Derrick wasn’t afraid. He didn’t hesitate. And he did it.

“In the medical field, when you save somebody like this, they call it a clinical save. This is a clinical save that was started by Derrick Goold. Period.”

Bill Hayes, a registered nurse who was on duty as a supervisor, said, “Somebody said, ‘Does somebody know CPR? And Derrick said, ‘I do.’

Goold had just entered the dugout area just before the Cubs were to announce the dismissal of Joe Maddon as manager.

 

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AED Inspection Checklists

So you have an AED, but do you need to inspect it?

OSHA Standards do not specifically address automated external defibrillators. However, their previously issued TIB-01-12-17 recommends the use of AEDs at every work site as a safe, effective, easily learned method to improve survival rates for sudden cardiac arrest victims.

Therefore, when seconds count, it is vital that an AED is functioning properly and the only way of achieving this is through, regular, routine inspections.

This is endorsed by the American Heart Association in their publication Implementing an AED Program, that recommends “It is important to do a weekly or monthly visual inspection of the AEDs to ensure they are in working order. The program coordinator or another designated person can do the inspections. This person develops a written checklist to assess the readiness of the AEDs.”

 

AED Inspection Checklist Solution

When it comes to AED inspections there is a couple of option:

1. Inspect yourself

2. Have a specialist manage your AED inspections for you

 

If you plan to inspect the AED yourself we have a great AED inspection Checklist solution that will help:

  • Meet OSHA 1915.87 App A
  • Make date and time-stamped safety status visible to everyone around the AED
  • Drive safe behavior in making sure AED inspections take place
  • Help the inspector by walking them through what to inspect using the checklist book
  • Ensure accountability and safety ownership with signature capture
  • Keep in instant and auditable record in the carbon copy checklist book
  • Engage supervisors and colleagues by making safety visible and building a safety culture
  • Make maintenance and repair proactive, fast and efficient

 

If you would like to learn about having your AED inspected by an AED specialist please Call Now to learn more about Green Guard Onsite Inspections.

 

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Learn To Save a Life In 4 Hours – CPR Training, Are You Prepared?

CPR/First Aid Training – Corporate and Group Classes

Green Guard offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, Green Guard’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Looking for a Team Building opportunity? Learn to save a life while providing a great team-building exercise.

Schedule Your Class Now

Call Now to speak with a Green Guard CPR/First Aid Training Specialist

Click Here to learn more about CPR/First Aid training

 

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It wasn’t his time:’ man performed CPR, saving life of neighbor in cardiac arrest

A man heard cries from his condo, and ran to help. He ended up saving his neighbor’s life!

After he heard screams coming from a nearby condo, Jeff Zilisch saw that his neighbor had collapsed. He used his CPR training to save him.

“It was being at the right place at the right time,” said Zilisch.

“My heart goes out to him,” said Tim Ridley, whose life was saved. “It’s just amazing.”

Tim Ridley

 

It happened in early August, as Zilisch cleaned his garage.

“Halfway across the parking lot, I realized, ‘Oh my gosh! This is not what I thought it was,'” said Zilisch.

Jeff Tilisch, Tim Ridley

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ridley was experiencing cardiac arrest. He was power washing his porch when he passed out.

“At that moment, I just had a cold rush from the neck up, and that’s the last memory I have,” said Ridley.

Zilisch jumped into action, performing CPR until paramedics arrived.

“I haven’t had CPR training in 20 years, and I just went into automatic mode,” said Zilisch.

Dispatchers talked him through it, as Ridley fought for his life.

“I knew it wasn’t his time, and I was like, ‘God, put this life back into this

man,'” said Zilisch.

Ridley was rushed to the hospital, where he woke up after 24 hours.

“Certain things had to happen, for everyone to be around, for me to be living, without a doubt,” said Ridley.

Jeff Zilisch

 

 

 

 

 

Jeff Zilisch

The life-saving actions were recognized by the Mequon Common Council Tuesday evening, Sept. 10 — these neighbors forever connected.

“He saved my life, and I’m blessed with that, but he’s the absolute hero in this scenario,” said Ridley.

Both men stressed the importance of CPR training, saying you’ll never know when you might need to use it.

 

Call Now to speak with a Green Guard CPR/First Aid/AED Specialist

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Source: https://fox6now.com/2019/09/10/it-wasnt-his-time-mequon-man-performed-cpr-saving-life-of-neighbor-who-went-into-cardiac-arrest/


Chick-fil-A Employee Saves Man’s Life with CPR in Parking Lot: ‘It Was Like Instinct Took Over’

A Chick-fil-A in California is serving up more than just poultry — it’s offering life-saving customer service, too.

An employee at the chain’s Chula Vista location is being celebrated as a hero after his quick-thinking CPR helped save a man in cardiac arrest.

Tauya Nenguke, 22, was working the Chick-fil-A drive-thru on Sept. 11 when he noticed a man lying unconscious beside his car around 8:30 p.m., according to local ABC affiliate KGTV.

As the restaurant explained in a Facebook post, Nenguke quickly handed his iPad for orders to a co-worker and “sprinted across the parking lot to find a man down with his scared friends frantically not knowing what to do.”

Nenguke, who recently took nursing classes, began doing chest compressions on the 20-year-old victim, local Fox affiliate KSWB reports.

“He wasn’t breathing or anything, his eyes were rolled back into his head,” he told KGTV. “I know this guy was out, [but] I didn’t know how long. I just started chest compression immediately.”

Nenguke even taught the man’s friend how to do CPR, and the two alternated until emergency crews arrived.

His fast action was later credited with helping save the young man’s life.

“There wasn’t any hesitation on my part. I knew that was the place where God placed me at the time,” he said.

Nenguke reportedly hopes to go to nursing school, and said the incident was a clear sign that he’s on the right path.

“This was truly a real big eye-opener to my calling to be in health care because at the moment, it was like instinct took over,” he said.

He’s worked at the restaurant as a team leader since March 2018, according to KSWB.

 

Call Now to speak with a Green Guard CPR/First Aid/AED Specialist

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Source: https://people.com/human-interest/chick-fil-a-employee-saves-mans-life-cpr-parking-lot/


Ladder Safety – What You Need To Know

Ladders are a leading cause of Workplace injuries and come in at #6 for the Top 10 2019 OSHA Violations

Ladders are a simple tool, yet thousands of injuries occur each year from incorrect use and lack of safety checks. While there are many variations of ladders the steps needed to safely use and maintain ladders are very similar. Here are some tips to help keep your workers safe and help reduce ladder-related injuries.

 

 

When should you inspect ladders?

  • Inspect new ladders promptly upon receipt.
  • Inspect ladders before each use.
  • Check the condition of ladders that have been dropped or have fallen before using them again.
  • Inspect ladders before storing to make sure they are in good condition to store, or need repair, replacement or remove from the site.

 

What should you look for when inspecting any ladder?

  • missing or loose steps or rungs (they are loose if you can move them by hand)
  • damaged or worn non-slip feet
  • loose nails, screws, bolts or nuts
  • loose or faulty spreaders, locks, and other metal parts in poor repair
  • rot, decay or warped rails in wooden ladders
  • cracks and exposed fibreglass in fibreglass ladders
  • cracked, split, worn or broken rails, braces, steps or rungs
  • sharp edges on rails and rungs
  • rough or splintered surfaces
  • corrosion, rust, oxidization and excessive wear, especially on treads
  • twisted or distorted rails. Check ladders for distortion by sighting along the rails. Using a twisted or bowed ladder is hazardous.
  • missing identification labels

What other things should I look for when inspecting stepladders?

  • wobble
  • loose or bent hinges and hinge spreaders
  • broken stop on a hinge spreader
  • loose pail shelf

What should you look for when inspecting extension ladders?

  • loose, broken or missing extension locks
  • defective locks that do not set properly when ladder is extended
  • sufficient lubrication of working parts
  • defective cords, chains and ropes
  • missing or defective pads or sleeves

 

What should you do after inspecting any ladder?

  • Tag any defective ladders and take them out of service.
  • Clean fibreglass ladders every three months. Spray lightly with a clear lacquer or paste wax.
  • Protect wooden ladders with a clear sealer or wood preservative.
  • Replace worn or frayed ropes on extension ladders.
  • Lubricate pulleys on extension ladders regularly.
  • Tag and take out of service any ladder that is has defects, or is broken or bent. Destroy ladders that cannot be repaired safely by a person authorized by the manufacturer. Ladders should be destroyed in a way that makes them useless.

 

What are some things you should not do after inspecting ladders?

  • Do not make temporary or makeshift repairs.
  • Do not try to straighten or use bent or bowed ladders.

 

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OSHA Announce FY 2019 Most Cited Violations

Congress and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) announced the preliminary Top 10 most frequently cited workplace safety violations for fiscal year 2019.

 

The Top 10 for FY 2019 are:

1. Fall Protection – General Requirements (6,010 violations)
2. Hazard Communication (3,671 violations)
3. Scaffolding (2,813 violations)
4. Lockout/Tagout (2,606 violations)
5. Respiratory Protection (2,450 violations)
6. Ladders (2,345 violations)
7. Powered Industrial Trucks (2,093 violations)
8. Fall Protection – Training Requirements (1,773 violations)
9. Machine Guarding (1,743 violations)
10. Eye & Face Protection (1,411 violations)

 

Did you know?

Green Guard First Aid & Safety offers online safety training programs to help keep your employees safe?  We also provide an extensive selection of PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) such as protective eyewear, respirators, and hundreds of other workplace safety products to help you meet and maintain compliance.

Call Now to speak with a Green Guard Safety Specialist

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