Visitor Monitoring

NIOSH Sound Level Meter App – How Noisy Is Your Work Environment?

iPhone displaying the NIOSH Sound Level Meter app.

Ever wonder how loud the noise really is and if it could be damaging your hearing? There’s an app for that!

Do you work in or near a noisy environment, such as a construction site, a popular restaurant, or a concert or sports venue?

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), developed the NIOSH Sound Level Meter (SLM) app for iOS devices to help promote better hearing health and prevention efforts. You can download the free app(link is external) on iTunes.

NIOSH estimates that 22 million workers in the United States are exposed to hazardous noise levels each year. The SLM app can help you prevent permanent hearing loss caused by noise—a problem that can occur immediately or over time.

NIOSH developed the app after its researchers found that most sound meter apps either weren’t accurate enough or lacked features important for occupational noise measurement and monitoring. NIOSH then collaborated with an app developer, EA LAB, to create a new app for use at worksites. Although the app is designed for use at worksites, it also provides accurate noise measurement for everyday use, and can be downloaded and used by anyone in any location, including concerts, movie theaters, sports events, and even school cafeterias.

Using a mobile device’s built-in microphone or an external microphone, the NIOSH SLM app measures occupational noise exposure the way professional measuring instruments do. For example, NIOSH SLM reports the sound level in different weighted decibels (the unit of measure for sound). In addition, the app can save and share measurement data. NIOSH recommends using an external, calibrated microphone with any sound level app to increase accuracy.

The NIOSH SLM also includes information on preventing hearing loss, examples of noise levels and their risks to hearing, and a searchable database of devices to protect your hearing.

To see the app’s features, watch this video(link is external).

For more information, please visit:

Source: https://www.noisyplanet.nidcd.nih.gov/have-you-heard/cdc-niosh-app

 

Call Now to speak with a Green Guard Specialist

Click Here to learn more about Hearing Protection

Chat? Click on the “Live Chat” button

 

linkedinFollow us    facebooklike us


October is National Protect Your Hearing Month

National Protect Your Hearing Month

Learn how to protect yourself and your loved ones from noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), and help spread the word about hearing health.

People of all ages can be affected by NIHL. Signs of NIHL may not be obvious at first, but they can build over time. A recent study shows that about 13 to 18 percent of children and teens ages 12 to 19 have signs of possible NIHL.

“Make healthy hearing a habit when you are young so that you can avoid NIHL. Exposure to loud sounds can have life-long consequences on your hearing, including making it difficult to communicate with others and to appreciate the sounds of nature and music,” says the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders’ acting director, Judith A. Cooper, Ph.D.

You can help prevent NIHL by making some simple changes to your lifestyle:

  • Turn down the volume. Set maximum volume limits on electronics and keep the volume low on music devices and TVs. Sounds at or above 85 A-weighted decibels put you at risk for NIHL, especially if they last a long time.
  • Move away from the noise. To reduce sound intensity and the impact of noise on your ears, increase the distance between you and the noise. Think of this simple step when you are near fireworks, concert speakers, or in a loud restaurant.
  • Wear hearing protectors, such as earplugs or earmuffs. Sometimes you can’t easily escape the sound, whether you’re at a movie theater, a concert, a sporting event, and in a noisy work environment. Earplugs or protective earmuffs can help. If you’re a parent, carry hearing protectors for your little ones and be a good hearing health role model by wearing them yourself. If you don’t have hearing protectors, cover your ears with your hands.

Source: https://www.noisyplanet.nidcd.nih.gov/have-you-heard/october-national-protect-your-hearing-month

Call Now to speak with a Green Guard Specialist

Click Here to learn more about Hearing Protection

Chat? Click on the “Live Chat” button

 

linkedinFollow us    facebooklike us


Tips for Encouraging PPE Wearer Compliance – Part 2

 

Eye Protection

Comfort Inspires Compliance

One of the best ways to motivate employees to wear their PPE consistently and correctly is to ensure it is as comfortable as possible. However, selecting comfortable PPE is not always as straightforward as it may seem. Comfort is largely subjective, and the best way to find PPE that addresses wearers’ preferences is to work with a manufacturer to conduct a wear trial. Through a wear trial, employees can try various PPE options on the job to determine which items work best for them.

 

One of the primary factors that contribute to comfort is fit

PPE that is too loose or too tight is likely to be uncomfortable and, in some cases, even can endanger the wearer by failing to provide effective protection. To ensure the best fit possible, consider the individual needs of the various employees who will be using the PPE. When choosing products for female workers, look for styles developed specifically for women. And if employees do not fit into stock sizes, work with a manufacturer that offers customization options.

As you work to identify the most comfortable PPE for your work environment, be sure to consider the types of work being performed, the environment the work is performed in, and, of course, the hazards that may be present.

 

Convenience Is Key

Even if PPE is relatively comfortable, employees may still choose to forgo protection in favor of convenience. If putting on the appropriate PPE is time consuming and cumbersome, the temptation to skip it becomes much stronger.

Let’s go back to the example of employees working in a laboratory where a separate chemical-barrier apron must be worn over their lab coats. If, in addition to the challenge of remembering to put on the aprons, the employees also had to walk into a different room to get them, the combined discomfort of the stiff aprons and inconvenience of wearing them would be a recipe for noncompliance.

Fortunately, in this particular scenario, as well as many others, resolving the issue is as simple as taking advantage of new product innovations. New lab coats offering chemical-splash protection (CP) are now available, eliminating the need to put on two separate protective garments. Furthermore, these lightweight, breathable lab coats are significantly more comfortable than chemical-barrier aprons and disposable protective lab coats.

Whether it is accomplished by implementing new products or other changes, the best way to maximize convenience and, therefore, compliance, is to make sure that the necessary PPE is accessible and easy to use. Whenever possible, it is also a good idea to try to reduce the number of separate PPE items necessary for proper protection.

Multi-Hazard Makes a Difference

One way to reduce the quantity of PPE components that employees will need is to choose products that offer multi-hazard protection. According to Frost and Sullivan’s North American Industrial Protective Clothing Market Forecast to 2020, apparel with multiple protective functionalities is becoming increasingly popular. This isn’t surprising, considering that many occupations involve more than one hazard.

Consider an environment that faces both chemical-splash hazards and thermal hazards, such as arc flash and flash fire. This exact scenario can be found in many laboratories, chemical-processing plants, pharmaceutical companies, and manufacturing facilities where paints, cleaners, coatings, batteries, agricultural chemicals, or LEDs are used. Until recently, workers in these environments would have needed both an FR garment and a garment that protects against chemical splash. But now, protection against these two hazards can be found in lab coats and coveralls that offer FR properties combined with chemical-splash protection (CP). Not only do these FR/CP products provide multi-hazard protection, but they are also comfortable and designed to be worn as all-day attire—all of which supports increased wearer compliance.

Multi-hazard protection extends beyond FR/CP products, as well. For example, some products offer simultaneous protection against flash fire, arc flash, and molten metal splatter. Other products combine high visibility with FR protection. When evaluating your multi-hazard protection options, be sure to consult all of the safety standards that apply to your industry to ensure the items you choose offer the necessary level of protection.

Inspiring wearer compliance is far from an exact science, but optimizing comfort and convenience can go a long way toward encouraging proper PPE use. And with recent innovations, such as multi-hazard protection products, finding PPE that employees will want to wear is easier than ever.

Source: https://ohsonline.com/Articles/2018/03/01/PPE-Tips-for-Encouraging-Wearer-Compliance.aspx?admgarea=ht.ProtectiveApparel&Page=1

 

Call Now to speak with a Green Guard Specialist

Click Here to learn more about PPE

Chat? Click on the “Live Chat” button

 

linkedinFollow us    facebooklike us


Tips for Encouraging PPE Wearer Compliance – Part 1

Respiratory Protection

The best way to prevent costly injuries is to promote safe work practices, provide the necessary PPE, and do everything possible to encourage wearer compliance.

  1. You painstakingly identified all the hazards in your workplace.
  2. You consulted each of the relevant safety standards and OSHA regulations.
  3. You implemented a comprehensive personal protective equipment (PPE) program and made sure every employee was supplied with the necessary gear and trained on how to use it properly. Everything went great for about a week. And then employees started wearing their PPE incorrectly, or even skipping it altogether.

What went wrong?

Why Compliance is Essential
When employees wear their PPE incorrectly or forgo it entirely, they put themselves at risk. There are countless devastating headlines to remind us of the tragedies that can occur in the workplace if safety hazards are not addressed responsibly. And even something as simple as rolling up the sleeves of a flame-resistant (FR) shirt and leaving the arms unprotected can have serious consequences.

Beyond the tragedy of human injury and loss, workplace accidents can be incredibly costly financially. For example, a single burn injury can cost a company millions of dollars in OSHA fines, hospital fees, legal costs, increased insurance premiums, reputation damage, and lost productivity. While some of these costs may not apply if the injury is truly a result of noncompliance and the employer is not at fault, there are no guarantees.

The best way to prevent costly injuries is to promote safe work practices, provide the necessary PPE, and do everything possible to encourage wearer compliance.

Barriers to Compliance
There are numerous reasons employees may not wear their PPE compliantly. One of the most obvious reasons is that the PPE is uncomfortable. When PPE doesn’t fit well, isn’t appropriate for the weather conditions, or is made from materials that cause irritation, employees are much more likely to skip wearing it, or at least make unsafe modifications to it in an attempt to alleviate discomfort.

In addition to discomfort, forgetfulness can contribute to noncompliance. And the more PPE items an employee has to wear to achieve adequate protection, the more likely it is that one of those items will slip his or her mind. For example, if an employee working in a laboratory has to remember to put on a separate chemical-barrier apron over the lab coat he is already wearing before performing certain tasks, he may get caught up in his work and neglect to put on the additional layer of protective gear.

Of course, even if employees do remember all of the layers of protective equipment they need, the inconvenience of having to put on and take off multiple items may deter them from wearing all of the necessary PPE.

As employees begin to regularly neglect PPE, regardless of the reasons for their initial noncompliance, it can lead to normalization of deviance—the tendency for behaviors that were once considered unacceptable to become commonplace and seemingly permissible. Normalization of deviance is a result of complacency. Employees may recognize a hazard exists, but because they’ve performed a given task many times without an accident, it becomes tempting for them to skip putting on the necessary protection. To make matters worse, newer workers may see veterans forgo PPE and think they can do the same. Pretty soon, noncompliance becomes the new workplace culture.

Fortunately, strategic PPE selection can go a long way toward encouraging compliance. And there are a few basic considerations that can help you make more effective PPE choices.

Source: https://ohsonline.com/Articles/2018/03/01/PPE-Tips-for-Encouraging-Wearer-Compliance.aspx?admgarea=ht.ProtectiveApparel&Page=1

 

Call Now to speak with a Green Guard Specialist

Click Here to learn more about PPE

Chat? Click on the “Live Chat” button

 

linkedinFollow us    facebooklike us


Companies learning CPR reap the side benefit of team building

Learning CPR can not only help to save a life, but it can bring your company closer together.

 

Taking a four-hour CPR course with your co-workers can build trust and understanding among employees.

Everyone working together toward a common goal builds stronger working relationships and understanding amongst workers.

Articles like this one form the New York Times, show how putting individuals in a situation where each person is on a level playing field learning together creates unity.

“It breaks down divisions,” Richard Hough III, the chairman and chief executive of the Silvercrest Asset Management Group, said of the courses. “You could have the C.E.O. next to the receptionist. You’re on an equal plain.”

Many workplaces try various team building exercises. They take company outings, attend seminars, different retreats, or parties. Learning CPR however, really brings teams together. Good communication is key for Chain of Survival. Learning CPR and working as team forces good communication. Teams learn to trust one another and most important become a team with a single task to save a life.

Next time your thinking about a team building event, schedule a CPR class and make your team building fun, memorable and learn to save a life.

 

Call Now to speak with a Green Guard First Aid/CPR Specialist

Click Here to learn more about First Aid/CPR

Chat? Click on the “Live Chat” button

linkedinFollow us    facebooklike us


Fall Prevention Awareness Week

Among older adults, falls are the leading cause of injury deaths, unintentional injuries, and hospital admissions for trauma.

 

Falls can take a serious toll on older adults’ quality of life and independence. To recognize this critical issue, at the state level, SCR 77 (D-Lowenthal) was passed in 2008 declaring the first week of Fall each year as Fall Prevention Awareness Week.

At the heart of this initiative is the message that falls are preventable. During Fall Prevention Awareness Week, California’s fall prevention coalitions, health care providers, and senior service agencies will hold presentations, health fairs, screenings, and workshops to raise awareness among older adults and their families and caregivers, elder care professionals, and the general public about the seriousness of falls and ways to reduce fall risk.

Below are some ideas and resources to help you plan for Fall Prevention Awareness Week.

National Fall Prevention Awareness Day, September 22nd

 

Source: stopfalls.org

 

linkedinFollow us    facebooklike us


First Aid – Corporate and Group Classes October 1st – 5th

CPR/First Aid – Corporate and Group Classes October 1st – 5th

Green Guard offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, Green Guard’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2 year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

 

Call Now to speak with a Green Guard First Aid/CPR Specialist

Click Here to learn more about First Aid/CPR

Chat? Click on the “Live Chat” button

 

linkedinFollow us    facebooklike us


The life saving box smaller than a toaster and why you need it…

Every 1.7 minutes, someone in America suffers Sudden Cardiac Arrest

 

If not treated, SCA can easily be fatal and it often is –more than a third of a million Americans die each year from sudden cardiac arrest. Perhaps more concerning is the fact that most of these incidents are fatal– and experts say that survival rates consistently hover at or below 10%.

Using an Automated External Defibrillator can increase the cardiac arrest survival rate by a staggering 70%

However, when it comes to SCA, it’s not all doom and gloom. Automated External Defibrillators, or AEDs, have been helping both first responders and ordinary individuals safely resuscitate SCA victims and save lives without complex medical training. AEDs work by producing a small electrical charge that can reset a patient’s heart to its correct rhythm.

While easy-to-use portable defibrillators are only a few decades old, AEDs are so effective at saving lives that they’re estimated to increase SCA survival rates by a staggering 70%. Despite these statistics, many areas of the U.S. simply don’t have enough AEDs to go around. Experts estimate that an increase in AEDs to optimal levels could save more than 40,000 American lives each year – and that’s just one reason why it’s essential for more people to learn about and have access to this lifesaving device.

Communities with comprehensive AED training programs see a 40% increase in cardiac arrest survival rates

Experiencing a sudden cardiac arrest can be terrifying for a patient and their family – and the fact is, even the fastest first responders often take 8-12 minutes to reach a victim. An AED drastically improves the odds of survival. However, to be effective, an AED needs to be sufficiently close to an SCA victim, and that’s one of the reasons why community-based training programs have been so effective at helping resuscitate cardiac arrest victims across the country. AED programs may be even more important in rural areas, in which victims may suffer an SCA a hundred miles or more from the nearest major hospital. In that case, it could take an hour or more for first responders to arrive – a virtual death sentence if nearby individuals do not have easy access to an AED.

Where AEDs are located in the United States

As many people would expect, the vast majority of AEDs (59%) in the U.S. are currently owned by first responders such as a policemen, firefighters, and EMTs. The next largest group of AED owners are schools (17%), followed by faith-based and recreational organizations, nursing homes and senior centers, and hospitals, clinics, and other medical centers. It’s a good idea to know the general places in which the equipment is most likely to be located, so, in case of emergency, you have a better shot at finding (or helping others to find) a nearby AED. In addition, if you or a loved one has a close family member with a heart condition, you may want to inquire about where the closest AED is, especially if traveling to remote or rural areas.

 

Below is a link to a popular AED locater app (Pulse Point)

Click here to go to the app download site

More AEDs in public places can save lives

In the first 10 months after Chicago’s O’Hare Airport installed 49 AEDs on the premises, the devices were used 14 times, saving a total of nine lives – nearly 1 each month (and that’s only one airport). When it comes to helping an SCA victim, every second counts. According to statistics published by the American Heart Association, every additional minute AED use is delayed corresponds with a 10% reduction in patient survival rates. This means that in especially large areas or buildings, such as airports like O’Hare, it pays to have multiple AEDs located in different areas in order to facilitate easy access to the devices.

Despite their substantial benefits, 64% of Americans have never even seen an AED

While AEDs save an increasing number of lives each year, many Americans don’t even understand what they are. This widespread lack of knowledge means that individuals may not be able to get full use of the life-saving equipment present in their community. Additionally, a lack of understanding means that many Americans are less likely to push for more AEDs in their schools, religious and community centers, and other public areas.

While the number of AEDs is increasing, especially in places like college and university campuses, it’s not increasing fast enough to help many SCA victims. However, increased education and awareness may be able to help. And hopefully, this awareness will help make death from an SCA into an uncommon occurrence.

To learn more about how AEDs (and proper training in their usage) can help save lives in businesses, schools, and other public places, contact Green Guard for a free consultation.

 

Call Now to speak with a AED Specialist

Click Here to learn more about AED’s

Chat? Click on the “Live Chat” button to speak now with a AED Specialist

Click here to learn about CPR Training

 

linkedin Follow us    facebook like us


Corporate and Group First Aid/CPR Classes – September 24th-28th

First Aid/CPR Training

Here are 3 real reasons why First Aid/CPR Training is one of the most important training classes you can ever have…

 

* 900 Americans die every day from Sudden Cardiac Arrest

* 95% of victims die before reaching a hospital

* 4 minutes – Brain death starts to occur within 4 minutes, the average response time of EMS is 8 minutes.

 

CPR/First Aid – Corporate and Group Classes September 24th – 28th

Green Guard offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, Green Guard’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2 year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

 

Call Now to speak with a Green Guard First Aid/CPR Specialist

Click Here to learn more about First Aid/CPR

Chat? Click on the “Live Chat” button

 

linkedinFollow us    facebooklike us


National Child Safety Week – Car Seats and Booster Seats

Car Seats and Booster Seats

Car seats and boosters provide protection for infants and children in a crash

Car crashes are a leading cause of death for children ages 1 to 13. That’s why it’s so important to choose and use the right car seat correctly every time your child is in the car. Follow these important steps to choose the right seat, install it correctly, and keep your child safe.

Find the right car seat

Install your car seat correctly

Keep your child safe in a car seat

Car Seat Types

Learn about the four types of car seats, while keeping in mind the following tips:

Rear-Facing Car Seat

Car seat rear-facing

The best seat for your young child to use. It has a harness and, in a crash, cradles and moves with your child to reduce the stress to the child’s fragile neck and spinal cord.

Types

  • Infant Car Seat (Rear-Facing only): Designed for newborns and small babies, the infant-only car seat is a small, portable seat that can only be used rear-facing. Babies usually outgrow their infant car seats by 8 or 9 months. When that happens, we recommend that parents purchase a convertible or all-in-one car seat and use it rear-facing.
  • Convertible Seat: As a child grows, this seat can change from a rear-facing seat to a forward-facing seat with a harness and tether. Because it can be used with children of various sizes, it allows for children to stay in the rear-facing position longer.
  • All-in-One Seat: This seat can change from a rear-facing seat to a forward-facing seat (with a harness and tether) and to a booster seat as a child grows. Because it can be used with children of various sizes, it allows for children to stay in the rear-facing position longer.

Forward-Facing Car Seat

Car seat forward-facing

 

Has a harness and tether that limits your child’s forward movement during a crash.

Types

  • Convertible SeatAs a child grows, this seat can change from a rear-facing seat to a forward-facing seat with a harness and tether.
  • Combination SeatAs a child grows, this seat transitions from a forward-facing seat with a harness and tether into a booster.
  • All-in-One SeatThis seat can change from a rear-facing seat to a forward-facing seat (with a harness and tether) and to a booster seat as a child grows.

Booster Seat

Car seat booster

 

Positions the seat belt so that it fits properly over the stronger parts of your child’s body.

Types

  • Booster Seat With High Back: This type of booster seat is designed to boost the child’s height so the seat belt fits properly. It also provides neck and head support and is ideal for vehicles that don’t have head rests or high seat backs.
  • Backless Booster Seat: A backless booster seat is designed to boost the child’s height so the seat belt fits properly. It does not provide head and neck support. It is ideal for vehicles that have head rests.
  • Combination Seat: As a child grows, this seat transitions from a forward-facing seat with a harness into a booster.
  • All-in-One Seat: This seat can change from a rear-facing seat to a forward-facing seat (with a harness and tether) and to a booster seat as a child grows.

Seat Belt

Seat Belt

Should lie across the upper thighs and be snug across the shoulder and chest to restrain your child safely in a crash. It should not rest on the stomach area or across the neck or face.

Car Seat Recommendations

There are many car seat choices on the market. Use the information below to help you choose the type of car seat that best meets your child’s needs or print out NHTSA’s car seat recommendations for children (PDF, 370 KB).

  • Select a car seat based on your child’s age and size, then choose a seat that fits in your vehicle, and use it every time.
  • Always refer to your specific car seat manufacturer’s instructions (check height and weight limits) and read the vehicle owner’s manual on how to install the car seat using the seat belt or lower anchors and a tether, if available.
  • To maximize safety, keep your child in the car seat for as long as possible, as long as the child fits within the manufacturer’s height and weight requirements.
  • Keep your child in the back seat at least through age 12.

Recommended car seats based on your child’s age and size

 

Rear-Facing Car Seat

Car seat rear-facing

Birth-12 Months

Your child under age 1 should always ride in a rear-facing car seat. There are different types of rear-facing car seats:

  • Infant-only seats can only be used rear-facing.
  • Convertible and all-in-one car seats typically have higher height and weight limits for the rear-facing position, allowing you to keep your child rear-facing for a longer period of time.

1 – 3 Years

Keep your child rear-facing as long as possible. It’s the best way to keep him or her safe. Your child should remain in a rear-facing car seat until he or she reaches the top height or weight limit allowed by your car seat’s manufacturer. Once your child outgrows the rear-facing car seat, your child is ready to travel in a forward-facing car seat with a harness and tether.


Forward-Facing Car Seat

Car seat forward-facing

1 – 3 Years

Keep your child rear-facing as long as possible. It’s the best way to keep him or her safe. Your child should remain in a rear-facing car seat until he or she reaches the top height or weight limit allowed by your car seat’s manufacturer. Once your child outgrows the rear-facing car seat, your child is ready to travel in a forward-facing car seat with a harness and tether.

4 – 7 Years

Keep your child in a forward-facing car seat with a harness and tether until he or she reaches the top height or weight limit allowed by your car seat’s manufacturer. Once your child outgrows the forward-facing car seat with a harness, it’s time to travel in a booster seat, but still in the back seat.


Booster Seat

Car seat booster

4 – 7 Years

Keep your child in a forward-facing car seat with a harness and tether until he or she reaches the top height or weight limit allowed by your car seat’s manufacturer. Once your child outgrows the forward-facing car seat with a harness, it’s time to travel in a booster seat, but still in the back seat.

8 – 12 Years

Keep your child in a booster seat until he or she is big enough to fit in a seat belt properly. For a seat belt to fit properly the lap belt must lie snugly across the upper thighs, not the stomach. The shoulder belt should lie snugly across the shoulder and chest and not cross the neck or face. Remember: your child should still ride in the back seat because it’s safer there.


Seat Belt

Seat Belt

8 – 12 Years

Keep your child in a booster seat until he or she is big enough to fit in a seat belt properly. For a seat belt to fit properly the lap belt must lie snugly across the upper thighs, not the stomach. The shoulder belt should lie snugly across the shoulder and chest and not cross the neck or face. Remember: your child should still ride in the back seat because it’s safer there.

Find & Compare Seats

EASE-OF-USE RATINGS

The Car Seat Finder is an easy-to-use tool that lets you compare seats and ease-of-use ratings to find the right car seat for your child. Just fill out your child’s age, height and weight below, and you’ll be provided car seat types that fit your child. Before you get started, make sure you’re familiar with the four types of car seats and NHTSA’s recommendations for choosing the right type of seat for your child.

linkedinFollow us    facebooklike us