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13-Year-Old Scientist’s Research Shows Hand Dryers Can Hurt Kids’ Ears

Hand dryers are ubiquitous in public restrooms, the noise they make may be harmful to children’s ears.

According to research recently published in the Canadian journal Paediatrics & Child Health, And the study’s author can speak from personal experience.

 

“Sometimes after using hand dryers my ears would start ringing,” 13-year-old Nora Keegan from Calgary, Canada, tells NPR. “I also noticed that children would not want to use hand dryers, and they’d be covering their ears.”

So when she was 9, Nora decided to test the volume of hand dryers and find out if they were detrimental to children’s hearing. Nora’s research confirming her hypothesis was published in June.

Nora Keegan takes measurements in 2016 (Courtesy of the Keegan family)

Hand dryers are actually really, really loud, and especially at children’s heights since they’re close to where the air comes out,” says Nora, noting that children’s ears are more sensitive.

For the study, which was conducted between 2015 and 2017, she visited more than 40 public washrooms in Alberta, Canada. She used a professional decibel meter to measure sound levels of hand dryers from various heights and distances.

The young scientist then presented her research at a Calgary Youth Science Fair earlier this year.

She discovered that Xlerator hand dryers and two types of Dyson Airblade hand dryers posed the greatest threats to children’s hearing. These types all exceed 100 decibels — a volume that can lead to “learning disabilities, attention difficulties, and ruptured eardrums,” according to the study.

“My loudest measurement was 121 decibels from a Dyson Airblade model,” she says. “And this is not good because Health Canada doesn’t allow toys for children to be sold over 100 decibels, as they know that they can damage children’s hearing.”

In response to these results, Dyson confirmed to NPR in an email that an acoustics engineer would be meeting with Nora to discuss her research. Excel Dryer, the company that sells Xlerator hand dryers, did not respond to a request for comment before this story was published.

“While some other units operated at low sound levels, many units were louder at children’s ear heights than at adult ear heights,” the study concludes.

Nora hopes her findings will spark more research into the issue and eventually lead Canada to regulate noise levels for hand dryers. But for now, she’s taking a break and spending her summer like many 13-year-olds — at camp.

Update July 12: Excel Dryer, which owns Xlerator hand dryers, provided this statement after this story was originally published:

At Excel Dryer, we are committed to our customers.  User experience is very important to us, which is why all our high-speed, energy-efficient models come with adjustable sound and speed controls as a standard feature. This allows facilities the ability to choose the best settings for their restroom environments.

Click here to read our post on hand dryer v paper towel hygiene – It’s shockingly dirty!

 

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Source: https://www.npr.org/2019/07/09/739783918/hand-dryers-harm-childrens-hearing-canadian-study-shows


5 Forklift Safety Elements – Part 3 (Know The Machinery & Rules)

Know the machinery – and the rules

Although lift trucks and personal vehicles share some similarities, they ultimately are quite different.

Among the differences:

  • Open structure; the driver is not completely enclosed
  • Weights ranging from 9,000 to 30,000 pounds, with rough-terrain lift trucks at the heavier end
  • Traveling speeds of less than 20 mph, closer to a walking pace
  • Three-point suspension
  • More prone to tipping overloaded or not – and varying stability
  • Tighter turning radius for operating in tight spots

Operators should always wear seat belts. Neglecting to do so can cause an operator to be ejected from the forklift’s protective cage if the truck turns over, resulting in a possible serious injury or fatality.

An operator always should be aware of his or her surroundings on the job site, as the load or environment may obstruct visibility.

It’s vital that drivers are aware of and making eye contact with, pedestrians or other workers during operation. OSHA best practices for maintaining visibility include:

  • Keep a clear view.
  • Always look in the direction of travel.
  • Use spotters or aids such as rear-view mirrors to boost visibility.
  • Use headlights if working at night, outdoors or in areas in which additional lighting would improve visibility. OSHA requires forklifts to be equipped with headlights when general lighting is less than 2 lumens per square foot.

 

Stay tuned for Part – 4 “Understanding the stability triangle” coming next week.

 

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Source: https://www.safetyandhealthmagazine.com/articles/16138-elements-of-forklift-safety

 


Less Than 20% Of Americans Are CPR Certified – Is Your Team Ready To Save A Life?

CPR/First Aid Training – Corporate and Group Classes

Green Guard offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, Green Guard’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Looking for a Team Building opportunity? Learn to save a life while providing a great team building exercise.

Schedule Your Class Now

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Bucket Truck Inspection Checklists. What should you do…

It seems there is little known about what’s required when checking bucket trucks and so we thought we’d share the consensus of findings…

The main OSHA Standard appears to be 1910.67 – Vehicle-Mounted Elevating & Rotating Work Platform states:

1910.67(c)(2)(i) Lift controls shall be tested each day prior to use to determine that such controls are in safe working condition.

If the vehicle is being used in the Construction industry, then the OSHA Standard 1926.601 Motor Vehicles, Mechanized Equipment and Marine Operations will also have to be followed which states:

1926.601(b)(14) All vehicles in use shall be checked at the beginning of each shift to assure that the following parts, equipment, and accessories are in safe operating condition and free of apparent damage that could cause failure while in use: service brakes, including trailer brake connections; parking system (hand brake); emergency stopping system (brakes); tires; horn; steering mechanism; coupling devices; seat belts; operating controls; and safety devices. All defects shall be corrected before the vehicle is placed in service. These requirements also apply to equipment such as lights, reflectors, windshield wipers, defrosters, fire extinguishers, etc., where such equipment is necessary.

Bucket trucks, of course, have all of the above features.

This video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0MdUM_VJxok may also be useful as it explains what should be covered in a daily inspection.

Having understood the above, the challenge for most safety professionals is making certain these safety checks happen! If that is a challenge for you, and you are committed to achieving a safety culture, SG World USA’s patented Bucket Truck Safety Checklist Solution will make a significant difference in Safety culture and compliance.

Want to learn more?

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Source: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/bucket-truck-inspection-checklists-what-should-you-do-nichols-mba/


Can I be sued for performing CPR? – What you need to know.

Can I be sued for performing CPR?

The American Heart Association consistently supports and promotes CPR classes for people not in the medical profession—so when someone has a cardiac arrest outside of a hospital or medical facility, there will be a higher chance of a bystander stepping in to perform lifesaving CPR while the victim waits for emergency response teams to arrive.

Studies show that brain death begins within four to six minutes after a cardiac arrest, and those who do not get CPR within that time are extremely likely not to survive. Getting CPR immediately—and if you’re not in a hospital, that usually means from a bystander—could mean the difference between life and death.

First, whether or not you can be sued will vary depending on where you are and who you are. The 2000 Federal Cardiac Arrest Survival Act grants those who administer CPR or use an AED immunity from civil charges, except in instances of willful misconduct or gross negligence.

Good Samaritan laws exist on a state-by-state basis. Mostly, they provide at least some protection for those who perform CPR or use an AED. Some states actually require you to step in if you know CPR or, in some cases, if you are a medical professional. In Vermont, for instance, requires bystanders to give “reasonable assistance” or face a $100 fine.

Generally, however, Good Samaritan Laws are there to protect bystanders who perform CPR. Mostly, you are required to ask permission before performing CPR if a person is not already in your care. If they cannot reply, then consent is implied.

You will not be protected by Good Samaritan laws if you try to go outside your area of training—if you try to perform an impromptu tracheotomy to save a choking victim, for example, and you are not a trained surgeon. If your behavior has been judged to be reckless or negligent, or if you leave the victim after initially providing care, you could also be sued.

If someone has a Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) order that specifies lifesaving care must not be provided in case of a sudden cardiac arrest or another health crisis, you must do as it says and avoid giving CPR—if you know about it. If you didn’t know about it, you generally can’t be prosecuted for giving lifesaving CPR anyway. But what about first aid? Medical professionals and lay-rescuers often ask if they can be sued for first aid? Generally, the answer is the same, you can’t be prosecuted for giving first aid to someone in need and you are not required to do so if you feel uncomfortable about it. Be sure to practice good faith and common sense if you ever end up in a situation where someone might need CPR or first aid.

Medical professionals who give CPR to people with a DNR order can potentially be in trouble—if they know about the DNR. The issue of giving CPR to someone with a DNR is complicated, however. In some states, DNR orders are only valid inside a hospital setting; outside the hospital, they do not apply. This means that an emergency response team can legally give someone CPR even if they have a DNR order. In other states, however, emergency medical responders are allowed to abide by DNR orders when responding to emergency calls in the victim’s home.

In addition, in some states, patients who move from one healthcare facility to another are required to tell their medical teams about the DNR.  Usually, medical professionals are not required to abide by a DNR order they do not know about.

The truth is that you can be sued for anything, at any time. The question is not whether you can be sued for performing CPR; the question is whether you can be successfully sued. The answer in most cases is no; Good Samaritan laws in most states protect bystanders from legal consequences if they act prudently and in keeping with their training. Hopefully, widely publicized cases of people being refused CPR will not keep non-medical citizens from getting certified for CPR—and providing lifesaving care if it is required.

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Only 1 in 5 adults are CPR certified – Get certified now and help save a life

CPR/First Aid Training – Corporate and Group Classes

Green Guard offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, Green Guard’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Looking for a Team Building opportunity? Learn to save a life while providing a great team building exercise.

Call Now to speak with a Green Guard CPR/First Aid Training Specialist

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First responders save man after 45 minutes of CPR

Shabiah Gordon’s near-death experience began in the early morning hours of February 24, when his wife Rosa Gordon noticed that her 39-year-old husband’s breathing was not normal.

Rosa tried unsuccessfully to wake up her husband, who had not had any health issues previously.

She called 911, and first responders arrived and sprang into action to help the father of four, who was in cardiac and respiratory arrest.

That’s when the determined paramedics performed CPR for 45 minutes, determined to get a pulse.

Officials say after two weeks in the intensive care unit, Gordon was able to walk out of the hospital, regaining full neurological function.

First responders from both teams include Office of EMS EMT Nicholas Gammello and Paramedic Jacob Gault; Clermont Fire Department Engine 101 team Firefighter/EMT Bruce Mace, Firefighter/EMT Jordan Bennett, Engineer/Paramedic Blake McCorkle, Lieutenant/EMT Jason Ness.

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Source: http://www.fox35orlando.com/home/first-responders-save-man-after-45-minutes-of-cpr


5 Forklift Safety Elements – Part 2 (Performing Inspections)

5 elements of forklift safety – Part 2

Performing checkups

Operators are urged to inspect forklifts before each job, checking first the items that can be monitored without the engine running. Checkpoints should include seat belts, tires, lights, horn, brakes, backup alarms and fluid levels, as well as the moving and load-supporting parts of the forklift.

Kertzman said his agency commonly issues citations to companies that neglect to maintain forklifts in good working condition.

“It’s low-hanging fruit to have a beat-up truck sitting out there that any inspector can spot half a dozen things wrong with it from 40 feet away,” Kertzman said.

The Washington L&I citation process involves discussing the area(s) of code violation, explaining to the employer how the organization failed to comply and offering possible methods to resolve the issue.

“Then the employer is ultimately on the hook to decide what they’re going to do, and then make those changes in a timely fashion,” Kertzman said.

 

When to Perform Inspections

Whether it’s in a warehouse or outside, there are a few precautions you must take before you actually operate the lift. Your pre-shift checklist is one of the most important things you learn about during forklift safety training. Here is what these inspections entail.

When you go through forklift safety training, you’re taught that forklift safety inspections should be performed before every single shift. This does not mean that one safety inspection per day is all that is required. If there are multiple shifts per day, each operator must perform an inspection before their shift begins. This ensures the safety of the operator and everyone working in the space around them. These pre-shift checks can also help to prevent warehouse accidents that may damage goods or products. There are two types of pre-shift checks that must be done: a visual check and an operational pre-use check.

forklift training nj

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Visual Check

The visual check is to be done before you start the forklift. During this check, you are going over the general condition of the forklift:

  • Tires: Check tires for any noticeable damages like cuts or gouges. Ensure the tire pressure is at the optimum level for pneumatic tires.
  • Fluid Levels: Make sure that all fluid levels including oil, fuel, or water are where they need to be.
  • Battery: Ensure the battery is fully charged. Check for exposed wires or loose cable connectors.
  • Forks and Mast: Check for any physical damage to the forks or mast of the forklift including bends or cracks.
  • Seatbelt: Every sit-down forklift needs a seatbelt. Make sure it is working and there are no rips or tears.

Operational Pre-Use Check

The operational pre-use check is to be conducted when you turn the forklift on, before operating the lift. This check should include:

  • Lights: Ensure that both the headlights and warning lights are operational.
  • Horn: Test the horn to make sure it is loud and clear.
  • Hydraulic Hoses: Check to make sure they are secured.
  • Hour Meter & Gauges: Check to see if meters and gauges are working correctly.
  • Brakes: Check the breaks to ensure they stop the lift smoothly. Test the parking brake to see if it can hold against a slight acceleration. Double check the handbrake to make sure it is operational.
  • Hydraulic Controls: Ensure both the lift mechanism and tilt mechanism are operating smoothly by raising the forks all the way up and all the way back down, as well as tilting the mast all the way forward and then back again.
  • Steering: Turn the wheel to the left and to the right, making sure the wheels of the lift respond correctly.
  • Unusual Noises: Listen for abnormal sounds coming from the forklift.

If any issues are found during these pre-shift checks, they must be reported and the forklift in question must be taken out of commission until the issues are resolved.

forklift training near me

Workplace Check

Before you start operating the lift truck, you should always do a workplace check as well. A workplace inspection ensures that your work environment is clear of any obstructions and safe for operation. During this check, you should keep these things in mind:

  • Ground Conditions: Make sure you’re aware of the ground conditions in the warehouse. Look out for any slopes, spills that cause the floor to be slippery, or ledges that could get in the way of the lift or cause it to tip over.
  • Overhead Obstructions: Ensure that there are no overhead obstructions low enough to impede the forklift or the load being carried.
  • Personnel: Be aware of how many people are currently working in the warehouse and know where they are at all times while operating the lift.
  • Machinery: Always be aware of other forklifts operating in the same space or any other machinery that is being used during your shift.

Forklift Safety Training for Your Business

OSHA requires that these safety checks be conducted on every forklift before every single shift. These checks ensure the safety of the operators and those working around them. OSHA can and will request proof of inspections for up to four years prior. Because of this, it is recommended that you keep a good record of inspection sheets along with any corresponding repairs that were made. This way OSHA and insurance companies will know repairs were made as soon as a machine broke down. For forklifts that do not pass these inspections for any reason, it is crucial that repairs are done as soon as possible. Every company that uses forklifts in its daily operations needs to have an official checklist policy to ensure consistency and safety at all times.

 

Stay tuned for Part – 3 “Know the machinery and the rules” coming next week.

 

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Source: https://www.safetyandhealthmagazine.com/articles/16138-elements-of-forklift-safety

Source: https://cnclifttruck.com/forklift-safety-training-inspections/


Proper Disposal of Razor Blades in the Workplace

Razor blades are an essential part of many everyday business tasks. One of the crucial aspects of using them is to make sure that they are properly disposed of after they have become dull.

Razor blades are an essential part of many everyday business tasks. One of the crucial aspects of using them is to make sure that they are properly disposed of after they have become dull.

Hazards

Razor blades that are disposed of incorrectly can cause numerous hazards in the workplace. If they are left laying around, people can get stuck or stabbed by them, causing injury. Janitors and other maintenance personnel that collect garbage bags can be hurt by blades thrown into a trash can. These injuries can be prevented by putting used razor blades in the correct receptacle designed for the disposal of sharp items. Razor blades should be re-covered before disposal. Companies should begin by assessing when, how and where the blades are used and then outline disposal procedures.

 

Sharps Containers

Sharps containers are specially designed to hold needles, razor blades and other sharp objects that can expose others to injury or biohazards. These containers should be located near areas where such objects are commonly used. The boxes should also be within easy reach and readily recognizable to workers. Some sharps containers do not have to be emptied but have lids that self-lock when closed. The entire container can be disposed of as a whole but must be done according to federal guidelines.

Disposal

Sharps containers for the disposal of razor blades have to be sent to a facility to be emptied and returned sanitized. These containers should be closely watched so that they are changed out before they spill over, which can create hazards to workers. Setting up a monitoring schedule and ensuring that employees know the procedures for disposing of razor blades properly will help to make the workplace a safer environment.

Green Guard offers a complete Sharps Waste System mail back program with everything required to properly and safely package and dispose of your sharps waste.

 

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Source: https://homesteady.com/way-5745645-workplace-proper-disposal-razor-blades.html


Are You Ready to Save a Life? – CPR Classes Available Now

CPR/First Aid Training – Corporate and Group Classes

Green Guard offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, Green Guard’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Looking for a Team Building opportunity? Learn to save a life while providing a great team building exercise.

 

Call Now to speak with a Green Guard CPR/First Aid Training Specialist

Click Here to learn more about CPR/First Aid training

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