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Medic Bloodborne Pathogens E-card – Product #DC 5083

  • Must be compliant and in good standing with Green Guard’s training site/Instructor requirements.
    • Must have taught a minimum of 4 classes in the past 2 years
    • The Medic Bloodborne Pathogens eCard is the electronic equivalent of The Bloodborne Pathogens course completion card and can be provided to students as an alternative to a printed card.
    • Certifies that the student has successfully completed the 2015 Medic Bloodborne Pathogens course
    • Designed for Training Centers to issue to students upon completion of Medic Bloodborne Pathogens Course requirements
    • Security code required for purchase
    • Medic Bloodborne Pathogens Course eCards are only available to US Training Centers
    • The turnaround time is about 24 hours, except for orders placed on Holidays, Saturday & Sunday
    • Maximum of 25 Cards per Purchase
    • No refunds
    • Cards stay with the training site and are not transferable

Bloodborne Pathogens in Healthcare Facilities

Bloodborne Pathogens in Healthcare Facilities provides essential information while assisting healthcare organizations in fulfilling the training requirements contained in the OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard. This VOD program is one of the most effective and efficient ways to get employees the training that they need, in a classroom or individually through their desktop or tablet computer.


Bloodborne Pathogens in First Response Environments

Bloodborne Pathogens in First Response Environments provides essential information while assisting first responder organizations in fulfilling the training requirements contained in the OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard. This VOD program is one of the most effective and efficient ways to get employees the training that they need, in a classroom or individually through their desktop or tablet computer.


Bloodborne Pathogens in Commercial and Industrial Facilities

Bloodborne Pathogens in Commercial and Industrial Facilities provides essential information while assisting commercial and industrial organizations in fulfilling the training requirements contained in the OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard. This VOD program is one of the most effective and efficient ways to get employees the training that they need, in a classroom or individually through their desktop or tablet computer.


Bloodborne Pathogens in Healthcare Facilities

Bloodborne Pathogens in Healthcare Facilities provides essential information while assisting healthcare organizations in fulfilling the training requirements contained in the OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard. Bloodborne diseases continue to pose major health problems. Increasing infection rates for Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C are now making them as serious a concern as HIV, the virus which can often lead to AIDS. So it’s more important than ever for employees to understand the hazards of bloodborne pathogens, the policies and practices that can prevent their transmission, and the OSHA regulations that address them.

Topics covered in this program:
Include include HIV, Hepatitis and sources of infection, the Exposure Control Plan, biohazard labeling, reducing the risk of exposure, personal protective, equipment, Hepatitis vaccinations, post-exposure procedures and more.

 


Bloodborne Pathogens in First Response Environments

Bloodborne Pathogens in First Response Environments provides essential information while assisting first responder organizations in fulfilling the training requirements contained in the OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard. Bloodborne diseases continue to pose major health problems. Increasing infection rates for Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C are now making them as serious a concern as HIV, the virus which can often lead to AIDS. So it’s more important than ever for employees to understand the hazards of bloodborne pathogens, the policies and practices that can prevent their transmission, and the OSHA regulations that address them.

Topics covered in this program:
Include HIV, Hepatitis and sources of infection, the Exposure Control Plan, biohazard labeling, reducing the risk of exposure, personal protective, equipment, Hepatitis vaccinations, post-exposure procedures and more.


Bloodborne Pathogens in Commercial and Industrial Facilities

Bloodborne Pathogens in Commercial and Industrial Facilities provides essential information while assisting commercial and industrial organizations in fulfilling the training requirements contained in the OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard. Bloodborne diseases continue to pose major health problems. Increasing infection rates for Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C are now making them as serious a concern as HIV, the virus which can often lead to AIDS. So it’s more important than ever for employees to understand the hazards of bloodborne pathogens, the policies and practices that can prevent their transmission, and the OSHA regulations that address them.

Topics covered in this program:
Include bloodborne pathogens, such as HIV and Hepatitis, infection and the Exposure Control Plan, methods of exposure control, personal protection and vaccination, housekeeping and Regulated Waste, accidental exposure procedures and more.


Bloodborne Pathogens

800,000 Workplace Exposures – 5,000 HIV Infected Blood Exposures Annually

This course provides information for every employee who has occupational exposures needs, to learn how to avoid and manage accidental exposure to potentially infectious materials.

Your Employees Will Learn:

  • Bloodborne Pathogens in the Workplace
  • How Infection Occurs
  • Bloodborne Pathogens Specific Bloodborne Pathogens
  • Overview of the Most Common Bloodborne DiseasesHIVthe Virus That Causes AIDS
  • Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C
  • Transmitting Bloodborne Pathogens
  • Your Employer’s Exposure Control Plan
  • Recognizing the Potential for Exposure
  • Methods to Control the Risk of Exposure
  • Using Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
  • Hepatitis B Immunization
  • What to Do If an Exposure Occurs
  • Housekeeping and Communicating a Hazard in the Workplace

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First Aid Requirements for Businesses

OSHA requires businesses to provide  CPR training and First Aid to employees in the absence of a nearby clinic or hospital (OSHA Standard 1910.151).

While safety always begins with prevention, not every work-related injury can be prevented. Your primary first aid training goal should be to give employees the necessary tools and information they need to care for an ill or injured person, if necessary, until advanced help arrives.

OSHA does not teach or certify programs. Therefore, employers are faced with numerous programs to choose from, and the choice can be difficult. Because of this, a consensus group comprised of a panel of government and private experts developed the National Guidelines for First Aid in Occupational Settings in 1997.

This detailed curriculum identifies the skill training that makes a workplace first aid responder competent to provide care. Responding to OSHA’s requirement that every employer provide first aid assistance in the workplace, these guidelines document the minimum knowledge and skills necessary for an individual to provide basic life support care to an ill or injured person until professional emergency response arrives.

 

While starting a first aid program can be simple and inexpensive, it involves several essential steps:

1. Recognize that it is your responsibility as an employer to determine the requirements for your first aid program. As you assess your workplace, be mindful of the job site or work process that could cause illness or injury to employees. What types of accidents could reasonably occur in your workplace? Consider such things as falls, hazardous machinery and exposure to harmful substances. Be sure to put your evaluation in writing for reference purposes. Remember that, while OSHA does not recommend nor approve programs, it may evaluate your program’s adequacy during an inspection.

2. Assess the location and availability of a medical facility to your workplace. If a hospital, clinic or other such emergency response is not readily available, for instance, within three to four minutes, you must have at least one employee trained in first aid and CPR per shift. There is no recommended number of trained employees to have on staff; it largely depends on your facility’s size and type of operations. Responding in a timely manner can mean the difference between life and death, so it is crucial that you have an appropriate number of employees trained.

For organizations in multiple sites a larger number of employees must be trained. Many experts believe all employees should know how to provide first aid and CPR to ensure that help is always at hand. At a minimum, each department or location should have a responder available on each shift.

3. Make sure you have suitable first aid supplies readily available at all times.Click here to see current ANSI Standards

Effective Aug. 17, 1998, OSHA added an Appendix A to its very basic First Aid and Medical standard found in 29 CFR 1910.151. It requires the employer to reference ANSI Z308.1-1978, Minimum Requirements for Industrial Unit-Type First Aid Kits.

According to OSHA, the contents of the kit listed in the ANSI standard should be adequate for small worksites. However, larger or multiple operations should consider the need for additional first aid kits and additional types of first aid equipment and supplies in larger quantities. OSHA suggests consulting a local fire and rescue department appropriate medical professional or first aid supplier for assistance in these circumstances.

4. OSHA recommends you periodically assess your kit and increase your supplies as needed. Place your first aid supplies in an easily accessible area, and inform all your employees of its location. Along with a well-stocked, workplace-specific first aid kit, other basic supplies normally include emergency oxygen, blankets, stretchers, directional signs, eyewash stations and burn stations.

In addition to these items, if blood-related incidents are anticipated, you must provide appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) as mandated in OSHA’s Blood-borne Pathogens standard (29 CFR 1910.1030). It lists specific PPE for this type of exposure, such as gloves, gowns, face shields, masks, and eye protection.

5. On-site safety inspections, review of hazards and emergency dispatch, assessment, implementation, escape and treatment should be discussed in your training program. Employees must be trained to act and think quickly to avoid delayed treatment during an emergency. Ask yourself, whether each employee knows how to report an injury or illness.

Outline the accident investigating and reporting procedures and relay that to your employees as part of your company’s policy. Early recognition and treatment of an injury or illness is essential.

Employees must be aware of emergency contact information. It is best to post emergency procedures and emergency office contact numbers with your first aid supplies or in another highly visible and accessible area. Make sure that your field personnel also have suitable supplies and office contact numbers readily available. Appoint an employee in each department to watch for hazards and evaluate its current first aid status. Set a deadline to report any hazards or first aid needs to a manager or supervisor for improvement or correction.

Since people tend to forget their first aid training over time, OSHA recommends refresher training be conducted to recharge employees’ knowledge of first aid procedures. At a minimum, employees should be certified annually to perform CPR and once every three years to perform first aid. If such training sounds burdensome, consider that it can produce safer work practices and fewer incidents among employees.

Keeping the workplace safe involves three basic elements:

  1. Steps to prevent or minimize accidents
  2. Adequate first aid supplies
  3. Proper first aid training.

The employer uses training to make sure its employees know what to do, how to do it and who is in charge in case a first aid or emergency situation occurs. Proper first aid training not only satisfies OSHA requirements, but fosters goodwill among employees, who recognize the care that their company expends to provide a safe and healthy environment for its most valuable asset: its employees.

 

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Proper Disposal of Razor Blades in the Workplace

Razor blades are an essential part of many everyday business tasks. One of the crucial aspects of using them is to make sure that they are properly disposed of after they have become dull.

Razor blades are an essential part of many everyday business tasks. One of the crucial aspects of using them is to make sure that they are properly disposed of after they have become dull.

Hazards

Razor blades that are disposed of incorrectly can cause numerous hazards in the workplace. If they are left laying around, people can get stuck or stabbed by them, causing injury. Janitors and other maintenance personnel that collect garbage bags can be hurt by blades thrown into a trash can. These injuries can be prevented by putting used razor blades in the correct receptacle designed for the disposal of sharp items. Razor blades should be re-covered before disposal. Companies should begin by assessing when, how and where the blades are used and then outline disposal procedures.

 

Sharps Containers

Sharps containers are specially designed to hold needles, razor blades and other sharp objects that can expose others to injury or biohazards. These containers should be located near areas where such objects are commonly used. The boxes should also be within easy reach and readily recognizable to workers. Some sharps containers do not have to be emptied but have lids that self-lock when closed. The entire container can be disposed of as a whole but must be done according to federal guidelines.

Disposal

Sharps containers for the disposal of razor blades have to be sent to a facility to be emptied and returned sanitized. These containers should be closely watched so that they are changed out before they spill over, which can create hazards to workers. Setting up a monitoring schedule and ensuring that employees know the procedures for disposing of razor blades properly will help to make the workplace a safer environment.

Green Guard offers a complete Sharps Waste System mail back program with everything required to properly and safely package and dispose of your sharps waste.

 

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Source: https://homesteady.com/way-5745645-workplace-proper-disposal-razor-blades.html